July 1944 (3)

Gen. Hidecki Kojo and Cabinet

Gen. Hideki Kojo and Cabinet

18 July – Gen. Hideki Kojo, the Japanese Prime Minister and Chief of Staff resigned along with his entire cabinet.  The former premiers of Japan as an advisory group had moved the Emperor to form a new government in the wake of the increasing defeats.  Gen. Kuniaki and Adm. Mitsumasa Yonai took over the Army and Navy, which Tojo had been running under one office.

For two weeks, the bombardments of Guam in the Marianas had continued.  On the 19th, US Navy ships started the 2-day pre-landing attacks, focusing on the Asan and Agat beaches.  A Japanese diary of these days read: “On this island, no matter where one goes, the shell follows.”

While marines crawl onto a beach, an enemy shell explodes a troop-laden amtrac offshore. Survivors from other shelled amtracs are swimming toward the beach. (National Archives)

While Marines crawl onto a beach, an enemy shell explodes a troop-laden amtrac offshore. Survivors from other shelled amtracs are swimming toward the beach. (National Archives)

21 July – The 1st Marine Brigade/3rd Division and the 77th Army Division went ashore on the west coast of Guam.  They discovered a sign left for them reading: “WELCOME MARINES.”  It was put there by the Navy UDT (Underwater Demolition Team).  It would then take 5 days for the two landing teams to link up.  A massive frontal attack took place that the men called “New Year’s Eve at the zoo.”  But the Japanese were mainly in cliff side sheltered positions.  They had not encountered the whole force.

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24-25 July – after a 2-week rest, the US 4th Marine Division landed on the Tinian Island northern coast while the 2nd Div. made a feint attack off the southern sector around Sunhanon Harbor.  The 4th ran into ferocious resistance from the Japanese as the 2nd moved up the coast to support.

25-29 July – on Guam, the enemy launched a massive attack on the 3rd Marines who lost 1,744 men.  It was still considered a defeat for the Japanese who suffered nearly 20,000 casualties and men taken prisoner.  Plus, the enemy lost the island’s main airfield, Tiyan, as the Orote Peninsula was taken.  MGeneral Geiger then headed north.

Pres. F. D. Roosevelt in conference with Gen. D. MacArthur, Adm. Chester Nimitz, Adm. W. D. Leahy, while on tour in Hawaiian Islands. 1944. (Navy) NARA FILE #: 080-G-239549

Pres. F. D. Roosevelt in conference with Gen. D. MacArthur, Adm. Chester Nimitz, Adm. W. D. Leahy, while on tour in Hawaiian Islands. 1944. (Navy)
NARA FILE #: 080-G-239549

During July, US military leaders, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and FDR met at Pearl Harbor to discuss the Pacific War.  The men were basically divided between the MacArthur/Halsey plan of attacking the Philippines and Okinawa and Nimitz/ Admiral King’s idea to by-pass the Philippines and go directly to Formosa and isolate Japan from her resources in the Netherland East Indies.

The Joint Chiefs eventually gave their consent to MacArthur and Halsey mainly because the King/Nimitz plan would leave major Japanese bases in the rear of the Formosa landing.

In the CBI theater, various enemy positions, railroads, shipping, troops garrisons and other areas of opportunity were bombed by both the 10th and 14th Air Forces continually.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Japanese cartoons from the Kunihiko Hisa collection cont’d – 

imagenes_divertidas_de_la_segunda_guerra_mundial2

 

imagenes_divertidas_de_la_segunda_guerra_mundial5

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Farewell Salutes – 

Donald Abbott Sr. – Vancouver, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Melvin Bales – Manitoba, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, ETO, 407th Squadron

William Carden Sr. – US Navy, WWII, USS Huntington and Guamletellier_grave-jpgpeleliu

Jim Delligatti – Uniontown, PA; US Army, WWII

Herbert Gilbert – Dryden, VA; US Army, Korea

Sammy Lee – Fresno, CA; US Army, Medical Corps doctor, (Olympic diver)

Allen W. Osborne – Thompsontown, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, HQ/127th Engineers/11th Airborne

Alton Phillips – Tampa, FL; US Navy, WWII

Revell ‘Jack’ Sowards – Manassa, CO, US Navy, WWII

Manuel Tabackman – Dayton, OH; US Army Air Corps, WWII

James Williams – Hendersonville, SC; US Army, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on December 15, 2016, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 43 Comments.

  1. Love your site and content.

    Would really appreciate if we’d follow each other.

    Great style and feel that we have similar interests. Thank you so much and Merry X-más 🎄🎈

    Like

  2. Wish you and your family a warm Merry Christmas

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Always appreciate the photographs you include in your blogs gp, they really bring that moment in time alive.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I just love your blog. Thank you for keeping these stories alive.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I believe keeping these stories alive to remember and learn from is most important. As the years trickle by, the school systems teach our children less and less about the troops that gave them their freedoms.
      I thank you for having an interest in them.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. So much death soldiers gives me such a sad feeling.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I never get over the huge casualty counts in these campaigns .

    Liked by 2 people

  7. loving the Roosevelt photo

    Liked by 1 person

  8. It’s so hard to imagine getting reports of losing 20,000 soldiers and still thinking that your plan could work. I’m sure it was hard for us to accept losing 1,700. I like the upper cartoon.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Very interesting and informative. When I read that 1,744 lives were lost compared to 20,000 for Japan it sure shows what a battle they had. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I think the Nimitz/ Admiral King’s idea had it’s merits, but I suppose that that is immaterial as the other one worked!.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I don’t MacArthur would have given anyone any peace if they had gone with the Formosa plan. Returning to the Philippines became nearly an obsession for him. Thanks for stopping in, John!

      Like

  11. Hi I already follow your fab blog, so thought I would share that I am super excited as I am officially in the running for the UK BLOG AWARDS 2017! If you could click the link and choose FoodandDrink&Lifestyle on the drop down menu:
    http://blogawardsuk.co.uk/ukba2017/entries/forkwardthinkingfoodinista
    Thank you kindly in advance your vote is much appreciated
    Melanie xx
    https://forkwardthinkingfoodinista.wordpress.com/2016/12/15/stop-there-is-still-time-to-have-your-say/

    Like

  12. Extremely interesting … my father (sailor) was on Guam during the war and told me of Japanese soldiers coming out of the hills and being caught watching the outside movies. His brother (my Uncle) was at Guadalcanal with the army. When I was a young fella staying at my Grandfathers, I toted around a Japanese rifle my Uncle brought back from that campaign. Neither of them told much about their experiences during the war.
    Great blog posts,
    g

    Liked by 2 people

    • Then hopefully these posts explain why your dad and uncle didn’t talk much about those years and bring you feeling closer to them. I appreciate you adding your story here for all of us.

      Liked by 2 people

      • As a student of history and my own experiences from 65-69, I understand a lot of the nuts and bolts but the personal side still needs to be expanded. Thanks for your posts, Sir, and they come to life as I read. You do us all a great Honor.
        g

        Liked by 1 person

        • That means a great deal to me, Thank you.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Yes GP, I agree with geezer94. I’m always interested in the personal side to each story and your posts always keep that focus 🙂

            Many of my friends ‘lost’ fathers in Vietnam. As you know, even those that came home never really came home. From my experience, most of them opted to keep silent about their experiences-understandably so.

            Those guys never got their due and that has always bothered me.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Yes, agreed. Vietnam was an a horrific place and I lost far too many there as well. That is one reason I’ve shied away from the subject and never really dealt with it here. I insist on keeping my personal feelings out of the posts [that’s what comments are for], and I don’t think I could do that dealing with Indochina. I remember when those vets couldn’t even get into the VFW. My father happened to be an officer in the Hollywood, FL VFW and gladly accepted all those I sent to him. As you said, they never really got the recognition they deserved, but Smitty and I did our best to try.

              Liked by 1 person

  13. Interesting to have the entire government resign in the thick of battle. How does that help them win? Sigh.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Kind of like having the coach quit in mid-season, eh? 🙂 But it probably saved their lives – sort of a run out of town on a rail form of disgrace. The loss of Singapore proved all the hoopla was for naught. They’d never be trusted again.

      Like

  14. I love the cartoons!
    I read this twice, just to make sure. The Japanese suffered 20,000 casualties on Guam alone, over the course of a few days. That’s more than both the Allied and German figures for the D-Day invasion on 6th June, and roughly the same as British casualties on the first day of the 1916 Somme offensive. Staggering.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

    • About 1,400 were taken prisoner, so the casualty rate was still an astronomical number at around 18,000. Despite the war continuing for more than another year, they were beginning to get on the desperate side, which led to risks and high numbers. Thanks for interest, Pete. I appreciate it!!

      Like

  15. Fascinating and interesting stories! The cartoons are odd

    Liked by 2 people

    • From a different point of view. Thanks for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

      • We really appreciate this kind of different view you offer in your tributes to the brave ones, GP Cox. Amazing photos from that time!

        It’s quite christmassy for us here in Norfolk, today we have been baking traditinal cookies, but we miss the snow from Norway. I have spent a few Christmases in Florida, it was grand too. Hope you are doing fine, dear friend, lots of love from across the pond,
        Dina & Klausbernd, Siri & Selma

        Liked by 2 people

        • Dina, Klausbernd, Siri & Selma,
          It is a bit different here, with no chance of snow. We’ve been given a little reprieve from the heat – so that helps with the Christmas spirit. I seem to be seeing more lights and decorations on our tour around the neighborhood this year, so that helps me too. In my mind’s eye I’ve tried to imagine a Norway Christmas and I think that just might be too much down-home loveliness for Florida to compete with. Everything here is fine. I can’t decide what to cook for Christmas dinner though – such problems, eh? 🙂
          Sending lots of love to you all,
          GP Cox

          Like

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