June 1944 (2)

USS California damaged at Pearl Harbor

USS California damaged at Pearl Harbor

12-13 June – the US TF-58 intercepted a Japanese convoy of 20 ships fleeing the Mariana Islands.  Most of the ships were sunk or heavily damaged  The USS California and Braine were damaged by enemy coastal guns.  Another Japanese convoy of 6 vessels was also attacked west of Guam.  The Marianas continued to be bombed by air, battleships and destroyers.

The same was done at Matsuwa in the Kuriles by the 20th Air Force.  B-29’s carried out the first air raid  against Japan since Doolittle’s attack in April of ’42.  They bombed the Imperial Iron and Steel Works at Yawata.

geography-of-northern-marianas0

The Marianas campaign expanded United States Army operations in a theater commanded by the U.S. Navy. Admiral Nimitz assigned overall campaign responsibility to Vice Adm. Raymond A. Spruance’s Fifth Fleet. Vice Adm. Richmond Kelly Turner would command the Joint Expeditionary Force charged with the amphibious assault. Turner himself would also command directly a Northern Attack Force against Saipan and Tinian, while a Southern Attack Force under Rear Adm. Richard L. Conolly would assault Guam. Vice Adm. Marc A. Mitscher’s Fast Carrier Task Force and Vice Adm. Charles A. Lockwood’s Submarine Force, Pacific Fleet, would cover all landings.

Lt. Gen. Holland M. Smith, USMC, Commanding General, V Amphibious Corps, would control the Marianas amphibious forces as each left U.S. Navy control at the water’s edge. Three Marine Corps general officers would command the landing forces on the targeted islands: Holland Smith on Saipan, Harry Schmidt on Tinian, and Roy S. Geiger on Guam. Amphibious units assigned to the Marianas included the 2d’ 3d’ and 4th Marine Divisions and a separate Marine brigade. Three major Army units-the 27th and 77th Infantry Divisions and XXIV Corps Artillery-were assigned from U.S. Army Forces in the Central Pacific Area, commanded by Lt. Gen. Robert C. Richardson, Jr. Army and Marine Corps units totaled 106,000 men. Naval support for this huge force included 110 transport vessels and auxiliaries and 88 fire support ships, from rocket gunboats to aircraft carriers.

14 June – Adm. Mitscher’s carriers, after a 200-bomber strike, left the Japanese airfields in ruins and over 100 of their aircraft destroyed.  As the huge armada readied for their D-Day on Saipan, Gen. Holland Smith, aboard the USS Rocky Mount, said, “We are through with the flat atolls now.  We learned how to pulverize the atolls, but now we are up against mountains and caves where the Japanese can dig in.  A week from now there will be a lot of dead Marines.”

Japanese bunkers on Biak

Japanese bunkers on Biak

Ground fighting continued on Biak as the enemy aircraft also attacked the Allied troops and the offshore shipping.  A squadron from the 71st Tactical Reconnaissance Group moved from Saidor to Biak with their P-39’s.  Over 100 aircraft of the 5th Air Force hit Wewak.

During the 3-day bombardment of Saipan, it was a bitter irony for Japanese Adm. Nagumo, relegated to command his tiny flotilla, to be on the receiving end of shells fired from 3 of the battleships his pilots had hit at Pearl Harbor.  The US Navy UDT (Underwater Demolition Team) went in to Saipan, but found no mines or obstacles.

The broadcast from Tokyo Rose: “I’ve got some swell recordings for you, just in from the States.  You’d better enjoy them while you can, because tomorrow at oh-six-hundred you’re hitting Saipan… and we’re ready for you.  So, while you’re still alive, let’s listen to…”

Click on images to enlarge.

####################################################################################

Military Humor – 

Why the Services can't work together...

Why the Services can’t work together…

b5d6d4cb2f7c51579330df1f2883a16f

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

####################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Ben Barnes – Miller, SD; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, 1st LT., pilot

John Groh – Knoxville, TN; US Army, LT., Transportation Unitth-jpg1

Victor Hickox – Paragould, AR; US Army, Company A/674th Artillery/11th Airborne Division

William Korn Sr. – Newark, NJ; US Army, WWII

Francis Macri – Rome, NY; US Army, WWII

Nevin Roth – Ormond, PA; US Navy, WWII

Gerrit Scholten – Boyden, IA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, B-29 pilot

Victor VanFleet – Kalamazoo, MI; US Navy, WWII

Andrzej Wajda – Suwalki, POL; Polish Army, WWII

Edmond Zawalich – Dorchester, MA; US Army, WWII

#####################################################################################

 

 

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on October 12, 2016, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 56 Comments.

  1. As an ex-service brat, I enjoyed the ‘Why the Services can’t work together’

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I enjoy reading your posts on the various actions and losses during the war gp, the Japanese losses are monumental, and it would be interesting to know or understand the Japanese versions of their losses. Their historical records would be quite varied to the Allies I think in many cases.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. As for your question about the photo, we’re not sure where it was taken. One guess is Dobodura, but there’s nothing visible in the background that really helps to firmly identify the location.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I agree with the comments about Tokyo Rose. Those propaganda broadcasts during WW2 must have had many different effects on the troops. Some may well have been disturbed by them, but others just made more determined.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I always enjoy the comic relief you include, for instance, “Why the Services Can’t Work Together”. It amazes me that our soldiers could keep their sense of humor in the face of incredibly difficult circumstances, and loss of life. The valor is humbling to a civilian, especially w/ Veterans Day not far off.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I think you’ve given me an idea for a post. General Holland “Howling Mad” Smith was a fascinating character, who was–should we say–slightly biased against the Marines.

    Like

  7. I believe that a lot of guys tuned in to the Tokyo Rose, not only for her music and sometimes unintended humour—but to find out what the hell was happening.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Einen lieben Gruß schöner Beitrag Interessant zu lesen Ich wünsche dir ein sonniges Weekend Grüße und Umarmung Gislinde

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Tokyo Rose was a fascinating character. A Japanese American who had been raised in Southern California, she was caught in Japan at the beginning of WW II and refused reentry into the US. Gerald Ford eventually pardoned her. –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    SPEAKING OF MEMORIES TO SHARE…!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I agree that I learn more history on your blog then in history class way back when.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Imagine letting so many of your own people die so horrifically in a mindless war that they started with a cowardly surprise attack. Hard to fathom.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. When reading these accounts one gets the idea of what a real war is all about.

    It kind of makes the present day spate of conflicts/wars. pale into insignificance; except that young men are still being slaugtered needlessly. and at the whim of politicians and megalomaniacs who always manage to stay well away. and back from the front lines of combat.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Tokyo Rose must have been a chilling voice to hear on the radio.I sometimes wonder even today how our minds are played with according to messages given on network broadcasts.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. I learn more history from your blog than I ever did in any History class.
    Thank you, GP!
    Have you ever written a blog about “Tokyo Rose” that you could point me to? I’d love to read more about “Tokyo Rose”. If not, I’ll google.
    Thank you, also, for always keeping us focused on our military (past, present, and future). We must support them in every way and be ever grateful for them/to them!
    That “Why the Services Can’t Work Together”…made me laugh. 😀
    HUGS!!! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Fascinating history. Are you going to put this together in a book?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wish I could, but permissions to reprint are easy to get for a non-profit blog – but not so much so for a book. It would take too long and cost more than I have to pull it off!

      Like

  17. Please continue to share your knowledge. We havnt seen GP in action lately, but he’s back people. The Hero is back in action

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Such a complex operation. Amazing how they pulled it off.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. The crews of those B-29s must have felt unbelievable satisfaction to be bombing an enemy who had attacked their country in such dreadful fashion. An aircraft that could not easily be stopped.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. The news in recent weeks is that Philippines ready to break alliance with USA and enhance it’s relationship with China. Distressing news indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve heard. I can understand their concern due to their proximity to China and size differential, but I am concern about other things. Their position with Japan, the Los Banos Foundation, which the 11th Airborne Assn. still carries on there for the children, etc. Rough situation.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: