June 1944 (1)

 Scene of devastation at Naga village near Kohima taken after fierce resistance from the Japanese, by the 7th Indian Division. IND 3709 Part of WAR OFFICE SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION No 9 Army Film & Photographic Unit

Scene of devastation at Naga village near Kohima taken after fierce resistance from the Japanese, by the 7th Indian Division.
IND 3709
Part of
WAR OFFICE SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION
No 9 Army Film & Photographic Unit

1-3 June – on the first of the month, the 7th Indian division overran the Japanese positions in Naga Village, Burma.  The USS Herring, a Gato-class submarine was shelled and sunk off Matsuma, Kuril Islands, by Japanese shore-based artillery with the loss of all 60-man crew.  The 5th Brigade accomplished outflanking the enemy around Aradura.

Burma

Burma

5 June – the first mission by B-29 Superfortress bombers occur as 77 of them hit the Japanese railway facilities in [what today is known as] Bangkok, Thailand.

6-8 June – 2 US light carriers were damaged after a Japanese air attacks in the waters off Biak Island.  Despite the lack of reinforcements for the enemy, the island would take 8 more weeks to be subdued.

Finding the air now free of enemy planes, American B-25’s dived to the attack, reporting the convoy as 2 light cruisers and 4 destroyers. Initially, it was claimed that 1 destroyer was sunk, 2 were left sinking, and the fourth was damaged.  A few days later, destruction was reassessed as 4 destroyers sunk and 2 light cruisers chased to the northwest. These claims were exaggerated.

IJN Harumsame

IJN Harumsame

One destroyer, the IJN Harusame, was holed by a near miss and sank rapidly, the bulk of its crew being saved. Another destroyer was damaged by a bomb and took some water; two others were slightly damaged by strafing. Neither speed nor navigation was impeded for any of the three. The two light cruisers reported by the Allied planes were, of course, the other two destroyers. These two might have taken some evasive action by heading northwest for a short time, but as soon as the Harusame crew had been rescued and the Allied planes had disappeared, the convoy reformed and continued on toward Biak.

USS Tang

USS Tang

On the 8th alone, the submarine, USS Tang sank IJN ships, Tainan Maru, Tamahoko Maru, Kennichi Maru, and the Nasuasan Maru.  This was a good day, but such sinkings were becoming quite common.  The American subs were taking a grievous toll on the enemy’s merchant and military shipping.  [ U. S. submarines sank 468 Japanese ships during the first 11 months of 1944, according to Navy Department communiqués. This total includes four light cruisers and 17 destroyers. Forty‑three tankers, 377 cargo ships and transports were sent to the bottom.]

Japanese bunker at the base of Kangu Hill.

Japanese bunker at the base of Kangu Hill.

9-11 June – the Japanese bases at Fangelawa Bay, New Ireland, was bombarded by Pacific Fleet destroyers.  Carrier aircraft from TF-58 struck the enemy air-power on Saipan, Tinian, Rota, Pagan and Guam in the Marianas.  Installations, defense positions and parked planes were bombed and strafed.  Approximately 150 [up to 200 in other resources] Japanese aircraft were destroyed, with an Allied loss of 11.  On Bougainville, P-39’s of the 13th Air Force flew 44 sorties against occupied areas at Komai, Kakaura, and Quaga, AA guns at Kangu Hill and plantations at Arigua and Tsirogei.   The 868th Bombardment Squadron B-24’s went on a “snooper” bombing mission and hit hit Truk.

Click on images to enlarge.

#####################################################################################

Military Humor – fng_081805

a80baabf34a96d5f8ac64580abe8cbcb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#####################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Earl Angell – Providence, RI; US Navy, WWII & Koreaeagle-flag

Mary Byers – Orangeburg, MO; US Army WAC, PTO

Kenneth Davis – Augusta, GA; US Navy, WWII & Korea

Leo Gray – Boston, MA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO 100th Fighter Sq/332nd Fighter Group, Lt. Col. (Ret.), Tuskegee pilot

Sidney Hughes – Rhondda Valley, So. Wales, NZ; RNZ Army # 14201034, WWII, 1st Battalion, CBI

Winston Johnson – Las Cruces, TX;US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, C-47, pilot

Joseph Kursur – Miami, FL; US Army, WWII

Joseph Locke – Hiseville, KY; US Navy, WWII, PTO, minesweeper

Arnold Palmer – Latrobe, PA; US Coast Guard, (pro champion golfer)

Frederick Wiessing – Springfield, IL; US Army, 11th Airborne Division, Sgt.

#####################################################################################

 

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on October 3, 2016, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 55 Comments.

  1. Sadly, but inevitably, some of those sinkings included troopships with their holds full of Allied POWs.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. As always a great post. I am still laughing at the two humor pictures.

    Like

    • Sometimes it’s tough finding new and funny cartoons for the humor section, and sometimes they you find the ones that makes everyone laugh!! Glad to see a smile from you Don.

      Like

  3. Interesting post as always, GP. Not often I see a female name amongst the farewell salutes – what would her role have been do you know?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Great post.Very interesting an d a lot i didn’t now.Thank you for history.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Apart from anything else, GP, your posts are improving my geography

    Like

  6. This link has nothing to do with the post GP I have no other way of sending this to you and I know you’ll find it interesting.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-01/australia-wide-billy-young-recounts-his-time-as-a-pow/7893504

    Like

    • I have done posts on the POWs of the CBI, Fepows and Changi camp, but only one other first-hand account — this is great Beari! Maybe I should make an Intermission post story out of it, eh?

      Like

  7. World War II history has always interested me. My father and uncle served in the Navy. Thank you also for reading and following my blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I presume that very soon we will all be made to feel really old when teams of archaeologists start diving down to all of those sunken Japanese ships.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Great post, Everett! I have to agree that we didn’t learn half of this in school and imagine it is worse now. Loved reading the comments. Humor was good especially the graduating from basic training and knowing everything 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. GP Cox,
    Now, after immersing myself into these letters, and as an retired teacher, I have begun to wonder if teaching WWII would be the history lessons of choice. They would teach honor humility, pride, sacrifice, suffering, faith, order, fear, struggle, hostility, conquest discipline, the value of life, and so many more concepts. The Geography lesson would be gigantic. When our family visited Normandy we all cried and hugged and bent down in prayers.I can think of no other event to give such unequalled lessons for our future generations to immolate.
    Sincerely and with appreciation,
    Sheila

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’ve said this to so many readers – the more I learn about this generation, the more absolutely in awe I am!! Growing up in the Great Depression, trying to survive and slamming smack into a world-wide war that still affects us today – we will never see people like this again I’m afraid. I wish I had been taught more about it when I was still in school.
      I wish more teachers felt as you do today.

      Liked by 2 people

      • The mentoring is not there. Kids are growing up in an ivory tower vacuum. They have no idea. And I also really believe that stopping the Draft was a very serious mistake in the US. It helped a great many kids become useful, proud, self sufficient while providing a valuable and viable career should they choose so.
        It’s interesting that the Brit Royals still make all their boys go into the forces for a while. Prince William was in for 7 years – helicopter pilot. Why do they insist on this tenure? Because it changes these boys into men – worthy of leading. When they come out they are changed for the better.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Exactly, I completely agree – BUT – at the moment, we’re so busy tripping over ourselves trying to be so very careful of everyone’s rights, being politically correct, etc, etc – we can’t get anything done!!

          Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t know they are teaching there today. I know my generation was taught very little of this and I too believe it would be valuable. There are still people alive who could go to the schools and give first hand accounts of what happened there. They are a valuable and important resource that is not being taken advantage of.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. It is amazing how quick things happened and the amount of resources used to achieve various goals. Funny cartoon that. 😃 Allthe best. Chris.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. A hectic time as always, GP. The photo of the devastation at Naga Village really brings home the concept of ‘total war’, and its aftermath.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. …and I was surprised by the effectiveness of a shore battery against a submarine. But the subs definitely did a fantastic job.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. The scale of this event (WW2) becomes more obvious with every post you make.

    Do do the honours for many silent voices, Sir.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. This was interesting. I didn’t realize that our submarines had been that effective. I remember hearing about torpedo problems early on in the war, but not much about successes. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I really got a kick from today’s humor ! Pun intended!:)

    Liked by 1 person

  17. It is important to remind folks that June 1944 was not only an important date in the European Theater of Operations but also in the Pacific. As I tell friends all the time, it was not called a WORLD War for nothing. Thanks for a great article.

    Liked by 2 people

  1. Pingback: The Weekly Headlines – My Daily Musing

  2. Pingback: June 1944 (1) — Pacific Paratrooper | vishal shresth

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: