April 1944 (2)

Battle of Kohima

Battle of Kohima

4 April – In the CBI, the Japanese started their offensive towards India by attacking Kohima, India.  This operation would suffer from supply problems and the typhoon season.  Over 30,000 of the enemy would eventually be lost to due to disease and starvation.  Ground troops in Burma received support from the 10th Air Force as over 120 aircraft struck Japanese railroads and supply areas.

5-6 April – the Japanese 138th, 58th and 24th regiments of the 31st Div. surrounded the Allied troops at Kohima into a 10-mile pocket.  The 58th attempted to make a surprise attack at the center, but were thwarted by the Royal West Kents.   Within the circle, dependent on air supply were the 17th Indian Light Div., 50th Parachute Brigade, 5th Indian Div, 23rd Indian Div. and the 254th Tank Brigade.

10th Gurkha Rifles clearing 'Scraggy Hill' at Imphal

10th Gurkha Rifles clearing ‘Scraggy Hill’ at Imphal

6-18 April – the Japanese 53rd in Burma took the Chindit supply base known as “White City.”  The Chindits in northern Burma received glider-borne reinforcements.  They then occupied the Japanese base at Indau and that cut the enemy off from southern Burma.

7 April – in Japan, it was decided that despite the Army being overstretched in the Pacific and Burma, the new offensive in China would commence.  Inchi-Go’s objective was to occupy south China, thereby providing open land routes to their other forces in Malaya and Thailand while crushing US air bases.

7-13 April – in India, the Japanese 138th Regiment encircled the 161st Indian Brigade and took Kohima, but further into the settlement, 1500 troops [mostly the Assam Rifles and 4th Royal West Kents), best back the invaders.

14-18 April – the Allied XXXIII Corps began to try relief operations in the Kohima area.  The 5th Brigade/2nd Div. smashed the Japanese roadblock at Zubza and made a break in the circle around the 161st Indian Division.

18 April – the Allied troops were finally relieved in the Kohima area as the 5th Brigade reached them.  This does not in any way slow the fighting down.  Both sides tried to encircle the other with flanking maneuvers.

Kohima War Cemetery

Kohima War Cemetery

26-27 April – the Allied XXXIII Corps started a major offensive to retake Kohima.  The 5th attacked the Japanese right flank from the north and the 4th Brigade came from the south.  After the British took the road junction, both sides took entrenched positions about 72 feet apart, around the “Tennis Court”.  The following 2 weeks would bring heavy and close-quarter battles.

27-28 April – in New Guinea, the Cyclops Airdrome had limited operation.  With the swift success at Hollandia, plans by generals MacArthur and Kenney began to take form on heading west.

A short gallery of photos of constructing an airdrome in WWII.

Click on images to enlarge.

####################################################################################

CBI Military Humor – 

The CBI version of being sold the Brooklyn Bridge.

The CBI version of being sold the Brooklyn Bridge.

"Corporal Gee Eye" always getting into trouble!!

“Corporal Gee Eye” always getting into trouble!!

 

 

####################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Eddie Agurkis – Newburgh, NY; USMC, WWII & Korea

salutetop

The Salute

Simon Bromley – AUS; RA Air Force

Ethel Gay Carmichael – Leader, CAN; RC Air Force (WD), WWII

Edward Ebanks – Hollywood, FL; Merchant Marine (Ret. 45 years)

Paul Kelly Sr. – Brighton, MA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-17 pilot “Millie K”

John McCambridge – Broad Channel, NY; US Army, WWII

Samuel Prather – Seattle, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 1st Lt.

Andrew Repasky – Library, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne, artillery

Robert Segil – Salt Lake City, UT; US Army, WWII, PTO, Lt., tank destroyer unit

Ruth Turner – Knoxville, TN; US Cadet Nursing Corps, WWII

#####################################################################################

 

 

 

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on August 9, 2016, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 58 Comments.

  1. This is close to home, now. I think all of these events were affecting the management of the POWs at the other end of the Burma-Thailand Railway.

    Like

    • I’m sure you must be correct, Hilary. The more the Japanese moved around, the more they would be in need for that railroad to be continued. Anything you’d like to add?

      Like

  2. Great piece of reading gp, I’m not really well informed of the India part in the War, I do recall reading about a Sikh regiment.
    That’s a great video clip of the makings of a landing strip, the Engineers were really a creditable part of the runway construction and maintenance.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Fine posts.beautiful blog . ..
    cobgratulitions….
    Welcome to see my creations: http://www.paintdigi.WordPress.com

    Like

  4. Cemeteries have all one thing in commom. It’s the last rest place for a lot of young men giving their life for freedom.of the people

    Like

  5. I really like what you are doing. A salute to you! My dad was a war hero. WW11 fighting for Finland against the Russians. He won a star. Shrapnel starburst on his leg about 16″ in diameter. He wears his badge with a feeling that he made it out alive.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You must be so proud. Your father and the rest of that generation were quite an amazing bunch! The more I learn, the more intrigued I become! If you care to share any of your father’s stories, feel free; every one here enjoys the first hand account point of view.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’ve got a story they wrote in a magazine 30 years later. There is a difference..what they wrote and what really happened. It’s a bit long. Do you still want me to send it to you?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Why not give us the gist of the story, sort of the way he would tell it to you.

          Like

          • Gosh. They were on the front lines. The Finns were supposed to go one way. Dad ( a lieutenant ) said it was suicide. He and 6 men went a different way. They ran into a village and saved the people in the town from the Russians. The men were awarded a parcel of land each for their bravery in saving the town. I suspect the Russians thought there were more than 6 Finns shooting out there. My dad declined the gift. A neighbor at the cottage (A Finn ) showed us the article in the magazine with my Dad’s name in it. He never spoke about it before. My dad had to say something at that point. That’s when the real story came out. He said “It was an accident running into the Russians”. They had no choice. All six men survived. The people in the village also lived. The 6 Finns got there in the nick of time! Dad said the Russians we just coming into the village at a distance. They (Finns) started shooting them (Russians) like turkeys. He told the story to the other Finn..never to us kids. I can say there was no ego in the telling. They just wanted to live. In fact they were surprised to see the Russians (about 100) Who knows? The village people told the tale. My dad said there were so many Russians. All he could do is defend the town and keep shooting. I can say their army was rickety. But their inner strength was strong.They call it sisu.

            Like

            • Now THAT was fantastic! I’m sorry to make you work so hard to give us the story, but I love it and I’m certain many others will too. I hope you don’t mind, but I made your entire statement into bold print so it would be noticed by others.

              Liked by 1 person

  6. A really interesting post, thank you. Lots of boys in my classes years ago were of Indian heritage, and they always seemed totally unaware of how many of their granddads had fought in World War Two. There was no conscription in India at this time and they became the largest volunteer army in history, according to Wikipedia. Two and a half million men!

    Liked by 1 person

    • And now you taught me something, John. Studying the CBI is fairly new info for me compared to the PTO and somehow I never read that they were completely volunteer. Thank you.

      Like

  7. Love the video. The music makes all those old photos stand out.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. As always appreciate the information, but those photos were really depressing.

    Like

  9. Another interesting post GP.

    Like

  10. Laughed when I saw “an easy way to unload a dump truck” in the slide show. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Interesting article and video, Everett. Learned something new again. Tons of work to lay a runway.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Fascinating video GP. How about that dump truck emptying method?!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Your long list of sufferings make us sad, GP Cox.
    Thank you for sharing all this information with us and reminding us how very privileged we are not having experienced wartime.
    Hugs to you from the Fab Four xxxx

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Wow, more background to what was happening in the CBI in early ’44. The film clip illustration of “dumping a dump truck” is the way they used to dump grain trucks at the elevator during harvest time. More reasons why CBI was such a hellhole, and was referred to as “C-B-I, confusion beyond imagination.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Good one, Adam. In the CBI, they used to say it stood for ‘corned beef indefinitely’ referring to the amount of Australian bully beef out there. [frankly, I like your better].

      Like

  15. My Mum’s neighbour was badly wounded by a shell or mortar at Kohima. He was in the West Kents, I believe. His face was badly disfigured afterwards, and used to frighten me as a child. Such sacrifice, and I am watching a Japanese-made TV…
    Best wishes,Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Thanks. I was totally unaware of Kohima.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. So much pain, anguish, blood, guts; and the eternal mud, mud, mud, and rain. Endless bloody rain … and in the end, all for what?

    For endless more of the same. The ancient Greeks had it right:” in times of peace, sons bury their fathers—in times of war, fathers bury their sons”.

    We do it better: now we have our wives and mothers and daughters bearing arms. Is this progress, or what?

    And so the beat goes on, the beat goes on …

    Liked by 1 person

  18. You’ve got my head spinning in India. I wouldn’t be surprised if you said that after the war was over, they were still fighting there. I like the film clip of the airdrome 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  19. it’s interesting how different the cemeteries look…. but they have one thing in common: they make me sad that so much young men had to die for freedom….

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: