April 1944 (1)

Task Force-58, carrier crews cheers as enemy aircraft goes down.

Task Force-58, carrier crews cheers as enemy aircraft goes down.

1 April – US carrier aircraft groups under Adm. Spruance launched a series of massive strikes throughout the western Caroline Islands.  Despite the US loss of 20 planes during these raids, the Japanese suffered 150 aircraft destroyed and over 100,000 tons of merchant shipping sunk.

CINCPAC reported that the 7th Air Force Liberators bombed Dublon in Truk Atoll.  Mitchell bombers of the 7th, plus Corsair fighters of the 4th Marine Aircraft Wing bombed Ponape, starting fires at the enemy base.  All aircraft returned safely.

USS 'Guarvina, April 1944, sank a trawler & cargo ships, "Tetsuyo Maru" & "Noshiro Maru"

USS ‘Guarvina, April 1944, sank a trawler & cargo ships, “Tetsuyo Maru” & “Noshiro Maru”

4 April – a Navy Dept. communiqué, No. 516, reported US submarines suck 14 vessels in the Pacific and Far East: 2 medium tankers, 11 medical cargo vessels, and 1 small cargo vessel.  The CINCPAC report stated a Liberator search plane of Fleet Air Wing-2 bombed a tanker near Moen Island.

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16 April – in the SW Pacific area, the 5th Air Force would refer to this date as “Black Sunday.”  While over 200 aircraft bombed Hollandia, serious weather moved in and blocked the bombers from returning to base.  Over 30 were lost or crashed and 32 men perished.  For a detailed account – click here.

19 April – in order to divert enemy attention from the US operations on the Huon Peninsula, New Guinea, the US Task Force-58, under Adm. Mitscher, bombarded enemy positions at Sarmi, Sewar, Wadke Island and Hollandia.  At Aitape and Hollandia, the enemy was caught by surprise and about half of the men were non-combat troops.  MacArthur said, “No withering fire met us at the beach.  Instead, there was only disorder, rice still boiling in pots, weapons and personal equipment of every kind abandoned.  No more than token resistance…”

Gen. Jo Iimura, Japanese Army

Gen. Jo Iimura, Japanese Army

[In post-war interrogations, Jo Iimura, a Japanese defender in the region at the time, said, “The Allied invasion of Hollandia and Aitape was a complete surprise to us.  After considering the past operational tactics of the enemy, we believed they would attempt to acquire an important position somewhere east of Aitape… Because we misjudged, we were neither able to reinforce nor send was supplies to the defending units.”]

22 April – by this date, the Marshall Islands were now under complete control of the US.  This would enable the Allied forces in the central Pacific to swing north through the Mariana Islands.

29-30 April – the Japanese base at Truk was bombed by the aircraft from 12 carriers.  They destroyed enemy ships, oil stores, ammunition dumps and 93 enemy aircraft.

Click on images to enlarge.

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U.S. Coast Guard Birthday – established: 4 August 1790coast-guard

 

Last year’s post for the Coast Guard was a fun one to do – Take a look!!

 

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Coast Guard Humor – 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Carl ‘Bill’ Amos Jr. – Portland, OR; US Coast Guard, WWII

Jeremiah Bowen – Bergenfield, NJ; US Coast Guard, WWII, ETO, USS Leopold, Purple Heart

Land-Sea-Air Tribute

Land-Sea-Air Tribute

Gordon Cameron – Fort William, CAN; RC Army, WWII, ETO

Arthur Kitagawa – San Francisco, CA/Topaz Utah Internment Camp; WWII, ETO, 442nd RCT

Theodore Lusink – Netherlands/Australia; WWII escaped POW/2nd AIF, 7th Division/RAAF

Russell Miller III – Philadelphia, PA; US Coast Guard, WWII

Leicester Orange – Burnside, NZ; RNZ Army # 442065, WWII, PTO, Sgt.

Clifford Roberts –  Miami, FL; US Coast Guard, WWII

Harmon Shoda – Loon Lake, IN; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Sgt., Honor Guard at surrender

Ronald Wehner – Toledo, OH; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS Sage/US Coast Guard, Korea, Vietnam, (Ret. 21 years)

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on August 4, 2016, in Current News, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 36 Comments.

  1. Reading your post gp, there is one very obvious point that comes out in each post, the vast amount of Planes and Naval vessels that are destroyed, adding them all up, it paints a massive collage of just how many were lost or destroyed, and also just how quick the conveyor belt of replacement worked.
    Cheers.

    Like

  2. I always enjoy the history lessons here. A question regarding military records as I hunt down my own father’s history – seems there was so much carnage and chaos back then, did men get moved around to battles or places where they were needed, but not necessarily end up being officially recorded somewhere?

    Like

    • They should have been recorded, but it is possible to be with a different unit and no record made. The Nisei MISers were often left off the official rosters being as they were moved so much and St. Louis did have that fire that destroyed 16-18 million records. That’s why first-hand accounts are now so important – to fill in the blanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Another thank you is warranted. And I have another article you might like. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-06/long-tan-veterans-to-receive-gallantry-awards/7696110 Lt Col Smith was my CO when I was in the Army. It was after Vietnam but he was a most impressive fellow.

    Like

  4. Your ‘Budget Cuts’ image might be a bit too close to home. There are a few stories I’ve heard that I can’t believe.

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  5. These reports are very interesting. My main interest in the Pacific theater is from March of 1944 until the end of the war. It was during this time my dad served as a naval aviator on the Yorktown and Lexington.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Very interesting, Everett! I also didn’t know about Black Sunday. Smiling at the Military humor especially ‘Budget Cuts’.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. So much progress and yet so very far to go.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. All the attention to the play “Hamilton” inspired me to get the biography on which it is based. Secretary of Treasury Alexander Hamilton was the force behind the creation of the Coast Guard. As you noted in last year’s blog, the reason was to enforce tariffs, our main source of income as a nation at the time.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I already knew that this was a long war of course. However, reading these countless action reports enables me to get a sense of just how long and arduous it was.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Like

    • And to think I merely skim the surface of their daily activities! The more I learn, the more amazed I become at this generation!
      Thank you for coming by, Pete.

      Like

  10. I agree. A lot happening here on a daily basis. The older brother, the war in Europe, received much more attention. Great summary of events.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Great article GP. Sobering to read of the lost and missing in the Black Sunday raids, as I hadn’t learned of them before.

    Liked by 1 person

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