Camp Polk – additional pictures/ Flag Day

Everett Smith w/ unknown buddy, Camp Polk

Everett Smith w/ unknown buddy, Camp Polk

The Louisiana area has been used for ‘jungle’ or ‘guerrilla’ warfare training for many years and influenced quite a number of our military troops.  I chose today to include these further photographs to help show what these men of 1944 saw.

Nisei soldiers, Camp Polk 1944

Nisei soldiers, Camp Polk 1944

Camp Polk 1944

Camp Polk 1944

Camp Polk 1944

Camp Polk 1944

 

 

 

 

 

Camp Polk 1944

Camp Polk 1944

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Flag Day 

Flag Day 2010

For this years Flag Day, I chose to help celebrate the Star Spangled Banner’s 200 years!  As national treasures go, it was a bargain: $405.90 was paid to Mary Pickersgill of Baltimore, who fashioned it from red, blue and undyed wool, plus cotton for the 15 stars to fly at the fortress guarding the city’s harbor.

A collage of 2 women, 1914, at the Smithsonian working to restore the Star-Spangled Banner in a room with a model of a giant squid; by Terry Winters.

A collage of 2 women, 1914, at the Smithsonian working to restore the Star-Spangled Banner in a room with a model of a giant squid; by Terry Winters.

An enormous flag, 30 by 42 feet, it was intended as a bold statement to the British warships that were certain to come.  And, when in September 1814, the young United States turned back the invaders in a spectacular battle witnessed by Francis Scott Key, he put his joy into a verse published first as “Defense of Fort M’Henry,” and then, set to the tune of a British drinking song – immortalized as “The Star Spangled Banner.”

A Betsy Ross Flag Day.

The flag itself, enshrined since 2008 in a special chamber at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, following a $7 million restoration.

This story was adapted from information found at the Smithsonian Magazine and the magnificent rendition of the U.S. National Anthem by GSgt. Alan Benoit, with many thanks.

US-Flag

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Military Humor –

The 5 Most Dangerous Things

The 5 Most Dangerous Things in the Army

military-humor-funny-joke-soldier-gun-army-artillery-Problem-Solving

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Rodney Buentello – San Antonio, TX; USMC, Iraq, Afghanistan, MSgt. (Ret. 21 years), Purple Heart

Franklyn Castner – Elkton, MD; US Merchant Marine, WWII, PTO, USS Monterey6a00d8345157c669e20133f0f333ff970b-250wi

Joan Durman – Waikato, NZ; RAF, WWII # 891692

Ben Hiraga – Los Angeles, CA; US Army, WWII, 442nd RCT

Frank “Bud” Karkoski – Wauwatosa, WI, US Army, WWII, CBI

Michael Marks – Miami, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 457 Artillery/11th Airborne Division

Robert Peterson – Concord, MA; US Army, WWII

Ernest Reinhold – Harrisburg, PA, US Air Force, 1st Lt.

Jacob Statesman – NYC, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO, Spearhead Division

Ivan Victor – New Orleans, LA; US Air Force, Korea

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on June 14, 2016, in Home Front, SMITTY, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 63 Comments.

  1. Our flag is so special. My heart always seems to beat a little faster when I see it waving.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on quirkywritingcorner and commented:
    Alan has a great singing voice.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Those photos from Louisiana are especially interesting. During the Civil War, my great-great-grandfather, a member of the 34th Iowa, was charged with herding Confederate prisoners through the Atchafalaya, up to Chicago. He began his service in the Yazoo Expedition, then moved on to Vicksburg before spending the rest of his time in Texas and Louisiana. He mustered out in Texas — maybe one reason I have such affinity for the state!

    Like

    • Thanks for stopping by and adding that information about your ancestor. We all love to hear these stories! And it’s as though this site becomes theirs too.

      Like

  4. Awesome rendition of National Anthem.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. From an old red leg, the field artillery picture cracked me up.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. You have a wealth of photos in your personal archives, GP.Perhaps one day when you are done covering the Pacific theater, you may wish to write the amazing story of your dad and family.

    Liked by 2 people

    • When I finish this, I plan on doing a blog for dad. Since blogs show the latest post – I was thinking of putting it on-line backwards. That way, after I’m gone, people will be able to read it from the beginning on back.
      My family has been difficult to research. My one grandfather was from the British West Indies, while the other – unknown – he took off before dad was born. Grandmothers are almost as difficult. One’s background unknown and the other German – my best bet.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. A belated Happy Flag day to you. Those historical photos are amazing.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Wünsche einen schönen Mittwoch lieber Gruß Gislinde

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Great old pics gp, the uniforms and faces show the men behind the scenes, and does give them reality.
    Thanks for the story behind the Star Spangled Banner.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Sorry, a little late to your post, GP! Happy Flag Day! Nice photo of your Dad & buddy! My flag is up flying everyday. 🇺🇸 Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m not always very timely at getting to everyone’s site, so don’t worry – I understand. Love to hear your flag is up everyday!! It seems the majority of our population only get patriotic when something like 9/11 erupts.

      Like

  11. I wish you could be in my classroom when I tell children the story of the Star Spangled Banner. I tell them about Key, aboard a ship, watching the battle, where the only thing he could see to know what was happening were the lights and rockets illuminating the flag. If he saw the American flag, he knew we were winning the battle. Oh, what a story I tell. -Jennie-

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Every time I hear certain foreign national anthems, I wish we had one that was a little more inspiring, and about our country or nation, rather than about just one person. Still, the giant squid cheered me up!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m sorry you don’t exactly flip over your anthem, but you’re right; it should be about the country as a whole. Still – I’m glad I got a smile out of you.

      Like

  13. Enjoyed seeing the pictures of your dad and the other ones. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Nice old pics, GP. I like the ‘colourising’ process used. I have a baby photo of myself which was treated the same way. (That’s presuming it isn’t early colour film of course…)
    That original flag was huge indeed. Must have been very inspiring to the US soldiers.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Well done, GP. My flag is hanging proudly.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. A great article today Brad, these old pics are priceless! thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. GP, what is polk salad that is referred to in the song by Tony Joe White. And what is the connection with camp Polk?
    (PS I’ve had to go private one my blog so you will need to hit the link when you go to my site to get access. I din’t want to lose one of my longest followers now)

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Your postings and the history you chronicle are amazing. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Wonderful old photo’s.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Thank you very much.

    Like

  1. Pingback: My Article Read (6-16-2016) – My Daily Musing

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