Tribute to the Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels of New Guinea

Papuan natives, known affectionately to the Australians as 'Fuzzy-Wuzzy angels', carry supplies during the fighting near Wau in New Guinea. The Australian forces owed much to native carriers who kept the forward troops supplied and helped to evacuate the wounded. AUS 1726 Part of AUSTRALIAN SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION

Papuan natives, known affectionately to the Australians as ‘Fuzzy-Wuzzy angels’, carry supplies during the fighting near Wau in New Guinea. The Australian forces owed much to native carriers who kept the forward troops supplied and helped to evacuate the wounded.
AUS 1726
Part of
AUSTRALIAN SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION

THE “FUZZY WUZZY” ANGELS

Many a mother in Australia
When the busy day is done
Sends a Prayer to the Almighty
For the keeping of her Son.

Asking that an Angel guide him
And bring him safely back
Now we see those prayers are
Answered on the Owen Stanley track.

Tho’ they haven’t any halos
Only holes slashed through the ear
Their faces marked with tattoo’s
And scratch pins in their hair.

Bringing back the badly wounded
Just as steady as a hearse
Using leaves to keep the rain off
And as gentle as a Nurse.

Slow and careful in bad places
On that awful mountain track
And the look upon their faces
Made us think that Christ was black.

Not a move to hurt the carried
As they treat him like a Saint
It’s a picture worth recording
That an Artist’s yet to paint.

Many a lad will see his mother
and the husbands, weans and wives
Just because the Fuzzy Wuzzies
Carried them to save their lives.

From Mortar or Machine gun fire
Or a chance surprise attack
To safety and the care of Doctors
At the bottom of the track.

May the Mothers of Australia
When they offer up a prayer
Mention these impromptu Angels
With the “Fuzzy Wuzzy ” hair.

by NX6925 Sapper H “Bert” Beros of the 7th
Division, 2nd AIF; it was actually written on the Kokoda Track/Trail !!!!

A MOTHER’ S REPLY

We, the Mother’s of Australia
As we kneel each night in prayer
Will be sure to ask God’s blessings
On the men with fuzzy hair.

And may the Great Creator
Who made us both black and white
Help us to remember how they
Helped us to win the fight .

For surely He, has used these
Men with fuzzy wuzzy hair
To guard and watch our wounded
With tender and loving care.

And perhaps when they are tired
With blistered and aching back
He’ll take the Yoke On himself
And help them down the track.

And God will be the Artist
And this picture He will paint
Of a Fuzzy Wuzzy Angel
With the Halo of a Saint.

And His presence shall go with them
In tropic heat and rain
And he’ll help them to tend our wounded
In sickness and in pain.

So we thank you Fuzzy Wuzzies
For all that you have done
Not only for Australians
But for Every Mother’s Son.

And we are glad to call you friends
Though your faces may be black
For we know that Christ walked
With you – on the Owen Stanley track.

054485_400

fuzwuz01

 

 

 

f-wuzzy-pic

131725533.a21ESqPK.FuzzyWuzzy

###################################################################################

Military Island Humor – booby-601x800

time_to_keep_a_low_profile-01

 

 

 

###################################################################################

Believed to be the last “Fuzzy Wuzzy” Angel recently passed away>>>

1e5a5486c73f1dca1c34eafc4a9fab86

Faole Bokoi – Papua, New Guinea, WWII

Click on link above to read his story.

 

 

###################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Alfonso Carrasco – Phoenix, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, HQ/187/11th Airborne Division

Charles Hart – W.AUS; RA Air Force, WWII, PTO

Coastwatcher's  Memorial; Papua, New Guinea

Coastwatcher’s Memorial; Papua, New Guinea

Thomas Hayes – Sydney, AUS; 3 RAR, Korea

James Lang – Newcastle, AUS; RA Army, Vietnam

James Miller – Dayton, OH; US Army, WWII, PTO

Ernest Patterson – W.AUS; RA Army, WWII

Pat Rogers – NYC, NY; USMC, Vietnam, Chief Warrant Officer

Frank Streather – Sydney, AUS; RA Air Force, WWII, 452 Squadron

Hugh Thomson – AUS; RA Army, WWII

Warren Warchus Sr. – Chicago, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, B-29 bombardier

####################################################################################

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on May 16, 2016, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 78 Comments.

  1. I love these poems so much…they gave me chills and tears! Hope you are well! ♡

    Like

  2. Thanks for sharing the story of the Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels. It goes to show that angels appear in many different forms in our lives.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I couldn’t think of a more meaningful way to show appreciation than by the words of the soldiers’ mothers. Thank you for reading it, Bev – they deserve all the recognition they get!!

      Like

  3. I enjoyed the poems including the one posted by TanGental’s father. Stories abound about wars, but not so much with poetry.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This brought me to tears. Thanks for reminding us of the humanity we all share.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Thanks for that excellent post on the Fuzzy Wuzzy’s gp, they are well respected and remembered by survivors of the Owen Stanley ranges, I do believe the oldest died recently.
    Knowing the Papuans they provided immense support to the Australians, strong carriers and formidable opponents.
    Great post mate.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I grew up reciting the silly children’s poem that begins, “Fuzzy-wuzzy was a bear; Fuzzy-wuzzy had no hair…” I wondered about the genesis of that bit of doggerel, and lo! it does seem to be rooted in WW II experiences. This page provides a bit of background:

    “The term “Fuzzy Wuzzy” originated in the 1800s. British Soldiers gave the nickname, “fuzzy wuzzy” to the Hadendoa warriors that were a nomadic tribe along the Red Sea in Sudan… The Hadendoa warriors wore their hair matted which gave a “fuzzy” appearance…”

    “Rudyard Kippling wrote a poem in 1890, “Fuzzy Wuzzy,” that praised the Hadendoa warriors for their fighting skills. ‘So ‘ere’s to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your ‘ome in the Soudan; / You’re a pore benighted ‘eathen but a first-class fightin’ man.’

    Today Fuzzy Wuzzy is known more as the nursery rhyme many of us learned as children.”

    It’s amazing to think how many people have learned the children’s poem, without any idea of where it came from. This was a fascinating post — thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for aiding in the history portion for this post, Linda. I remember that poem from childhood, but was unaware of a connection. You have proven to be a treasure trove since your first appearance here. And thanks for reminding me how much I enjoy and respect Kipling’s writing. I did not know about the Hadendoa warriors either.

      Like

  7. Great post as always…I have learned so much through your blog! Thank you!!

    Like

  8. GP, As always, you continue to educate me on the “heroes” I ‘d never know. Thanks for the share and you are indeed a historian.

    Like

  9. I love the poems GP. Reminds of the ones dad wrote as an 18 year old during his training to be a para in 1944/45

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I was aware of the Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels but knew little about them before reading your post, GP. As an Australian aware of how racist we can be as a nation, without ever publicly owning the fact, I had to cringe a little at the line about being glad to call them friends ‘though your faces may be black’. I hope we gave them recognition of their sacrifice and support while there were many still alive. I hope we didn’t wait until they were mostly gone to acknowledge them.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. a wonderful article Brad!

    Like

  12. very nice series

    and toppart:

    “And God will be the Artist
    And this picture He will paint
    Of a Fuzzy Wuzzy Angel
    With the Halo of a Saint.”

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Two lovely poems it’s good to know they were appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Nice tribute. These people had an essential role in keeping downed crews and others alive in New Guinea.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Loved the poems and sorry to hear about the last one going. They were angels!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Another interesting post which brings a forgotten era to life – this time with such warm, tender, loving poems. The personal nature only reinforces their immediacy. Such kindness, compassion in the midst of all the horror.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Wonderful post, GP, enjoyed the photos and touching tribute.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. We always recognize (and rightfully so) the people who died. It’s good to see the people who saved lives get a little attention, especially when they risked their own lives in the process.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Thanks GP, God Bless The Fuzzy Wuzzys.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Das war viel für die Leute alles zu tragen und den Berg hochzuschleppen Wünsche dir eine gute Woche Umarmung Gislinde

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Two great poems and a point well made. Not enough emphasis is put on the role of non-white personnel in two world wars. I have had boys in my class of Indian and Pakistani origin who did not even realise that their grandparents’ country had fought against Fascism, just like the rest of us.

    Liked by 5 people

    • I have an Intermission post on the Tuskegee airmen ready to go as well, despite the fact that they served in the ETO. They saved so many lives, I feel I would be remiss in neglecting them.
      Thank you for reading, John. It’s great that you help younger generations to know their own history.

      Liked by 3 people

  22. Sad to hear that the last of those Angels has now left us.
    I was interested to read of them being described as ‘Fuzzy-Wuzzies’, as this was the term used in the late 19th century to identify the Sudanese warriors during the wars with Britain.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: