Intermission (8) – Dr. Seuss, the troops and Malaria

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From Ann the Mosquito to Malaria Moe……

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Military Medical Humor – il_fullxfull.681157392_n45o

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Farewell Salutes – 

Edward Baumgarten – St. George, UT; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division, Purple Heart

Douglas Dodge – Saskatchawan, CAN; Royal Engineers, WWII, 14th Field Company

Harold Helman – Alma, MI; US Army, WWII, PTO260637844_god_bless_them_all_xlarge

Leonard Meltzer – Syracuse, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO, Purple Heart, Bronze Star, POW

Martin O’Toole – Oakland, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, POW

William Reboli – Newark, NJ; US Navy, WWII, PTO, radar, USS Indiana

Edward Spencer – Springfield, MO; US Army Air Corps, WWII, TSgt., POW

Albert Thompson – ENG; Royal Army Medical Corps, WWII, ETO

Victor Vosen – Downer’s Grove, IL; US Army, WWII, CBI

Frank Wilken – Boston, Ma; US Army, WWII, ETO, POW

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on May 2, 2016, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 55 Comments.

  1. Interesting post. My dad was in the Marines during WWII and got malaria. Sounds like he was not alone!

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  2. I can recall giving lectures on Malaria and using a few Disney cartoons as aids, if I recall correctly Disney did contribute to the War effort with Cartoon teaching aids.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Good one, GP. Aren’t areas like Louisiana still susceptible because of the marshes?

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    • As far as I know, in the past 15 years there have been about 125 cases reported in that state. According to the CDC…
      “About 1,500 cases of malaria are diagnosed in the United States each year. The vast majority of cases in the United States are in travelers and immigrants returning from countries where malaria transmission occurs, many from sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.”

      Thank you for your interest.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I enjoyed this. Thank you.

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  5. Liebe Grüße wünsche dir einen schönen Dienstag eine Umarmung Gislinde

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  6. Excellent. It made a new man out of me too.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I continue to find your work interesting…

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  8. GP, I picked a fun day here to visit you! Hope all is well! Phil

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  9. Fighting mosquitos can be a tough one.

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  10. And today the question could be asked, Are we prepared to fight Zika?

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  11. My favourite question to a class was always “What is the world’s most dangerous animal?” Nobody ever knew!

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    • As your students have learned since your class, that pesky mosquito carries more diseases than we originally thought! We cure one and another pops up! Now, it’s Zika. I’ll be that class wishes they had listened harder!

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  12. Folks tend not to know that the biggest enemy is also the smallest sometimes …

    There’s something ‘Sad Sackian’ about some of the cartoons, possibly the style of the times or maybe Seuss and the Sack guy were unconsciously aware of each other’s work … both of which I love. Especially The Sack~! (He’s my hero.)

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  13. Great post. Didn’t know that Dr Seuss was so involved. Heard that malaria was terrible.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Great post – especially for a Monday. An easy, yet powerful read.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Dr Seuss was a unique force in American literature, and his influence is truly international. My most vivid memories of books as a child all center around his stories and I still read them to my children. Its not surprising that he was a great choice for these wartime info campaigns.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I show Dr. Seuss all the time when I’m teaching. There’s a great site at UC San Diego. How Dr. Seuss participated in the war (WWII, Korean, and Cold). It’s an interesting angle students get a kick out of.

    Liked by 3 people

  17. It was amazing how many Pacific vets suffered malaria. Even today, quite a few troops who went to Timor few got malaria. It still strikes.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. They were right to be so concerned about malaria. It was such a debilitating illness, and claimed many lives too.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We lost many a man to the diseases out there, trouble was, these felt they were too healthy to catch it. That’s why Dr. Seuss and Disney were brought in to make training films, cartoons, etc.
      Thanks, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Thank you very much for linking me up with your readers. The troops deserve any and all recognition.

    Like

  20. Thank you so much for your loyalty to the troops.

    Like

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