CBI News

roundup

VOL. II        NO. 7        REG NO. L5015        DELHI,  FRIDAY                                             OCTOBER  29,  1943.

 

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MONUMENT TO FOLLY – This lone airplane wing represents a monument to the folly of Japanese aerial raiders who braved the wrath of U.S. P-38’s and P-40’s in a recent raid on a 14th Air Force airbase.  Forlornly it points to the China sky from which it and 16 other Nip planes, 15 of them bombers, were shot down in the battle.  Seven other bombers and two more fighters were probably destroyed.  All American planes and crew members returned safely.

14th Hits Indo-China; Gives Aerial Support To Chinese Infantry
HEADQUARTERS 14TH USAAF – Continued bombing of Japanese installations at Cobi, in French Indo-China and on the Salween front have been the missions of the 14th Air Force, according to the only communiqué issued from 14th Headquarters this week. Although some anti-aircraft fire was encountered, all of the planes returned safely to their base.    On Oct. 24, Liberators, with fighter escort, attacked Jap installations and barracks at Cobi. Twenty-five tons of bombs were dropped with successful results.    On another flight, B-24’s carried out a successful mission in support of the Chinese troops on the Salween Front when they dropped many bombs on Japanese installations at Htawgaw.
10TH AF HOLDS MERRY PACE GIVING JAPS HELL IN BURMA
Jap installations in Burma got another healthy going-over this week as bombers and fighters of the 10th Air Force continued to work out steadily on airfields, supply centers and communications. Results of virtually all missions were judged excellent, and operations for the entire seven days cost only one plane.    The Myitkyina area took the worst beating, good weather helping the boys to blast away at the runways, dispersal areas and railway centers. The enemy put up little opposition except after one mission at Heho, on Oct. 18, when a Liberator group sparred with seven Zeros for forty minutes, knocking off one definitely, probably disposing of another and damaging several more.    Mitchells started off the week by pounding away at the Myitkyina landing ground with excellent results. All of the bombs were in the target area and at least a third of the runway was destroyed.

 

by: Bob Bryant, INP photographer

by: Bob Bryant, INP photographer

INVOLUNTARY  CAMERA  HERO  GETS  GREAT  SHOT  OF  RAID         This photo by Bob Bryant, INP photographer in China, shows what you see from a worm’s-eye position when you’re caught in the middle of an airfield during a bombing raid. The Japanese radio, after the raid, claimed that the field had been “rendered unusable for weeks to come” and many of our planes had been destroyed on the ground. This picture gives them the lie. The arrows point to Jap bomb bursts, plainly well off the airfield, and inside the circle are the leaping flames from the only U.S. plane hit. For full details of how this remarkable photograph was taken, we print below the letter to the Roundup which accompanied the picture.
By BOB BRYANT   INP Photographer
CHINA AIR BASE – Well, finally, here is a bombing pix out of China.    After chasing from airbase to airbase trying to catch some action films the Japs came to me back here at headquarters – and damn near literally dumped it into my lap.    The Army was talking about putting me before a medical board for a Section Eight when they found I was strolling down the runway when the bombs fell. For your information, China hasn’t got me quite that bad, mentally, yet. My being there by my lonesome then was just the result of taking somebody’s word that the ching pao was over.    I left my tin hat and hillside position to go down to the field to get pix of our fighters landing, after “that somebody” said they were on the way in, and I got to the center of the field just as a second wave of Jap bombers struck. Thanks to the way our fighters jumped the bombers, it worked out fine – but that’s sure the worst feeling I ever had. To hear the droning of approaching planes and then suddenly recognize that it’s that peculiar, throbbing drone of Jap engines and not ours, when you’re in the center of the runway of a flat, level airfield. Even the closest ditch 300 yards away and nothing but parked airplanes – their target – to hide behind.    I did some fancy running for about 60 seconds, until the first bomb burst and then hit the ground, stretching out on my belly, hiding behind blades of grass 30 feet from the runway strip. Col. Eugene Beebe, commanding the American bombers here, says it was a good thing it wasn’t his boys up there bombing or there wouldn’t have been enough left of the camera and negatives for anyone to ever gather anything up to develop – to say nothing of me. Anyway, I got the picture.    The payoff was that after the last stick of bombs hit and I was running again in case they made a second and more accurate run, a burst of more slugs from the fight above the clouds came pecking down into the ground 100 feet away. That would have done it – missed by the Jap bombs and then hit my the machine gun slugs of your own fighters.    Everybody rubs me on the head for luck around here now. Several weeks ago I started to go on two different bombing missions with the B-25’s. Both times, after I was assigned to a ship and ready to go, something happened to make me stay behind. On the first mission, the plane I would have been riding in was shot down over Hankow. On the second trip, the plane I would have been in was hit and blew up over the target.    This hunk of war out here is beginning to get awfully personal. Bob.

FIRST  MASS  HELD  ON  LEDO  ROAD

PICTURE AND STORY BY PFC. JIMMY McCoy

r1204.jpgPicture & story by Pfc. Jimmy McCoy
Coincidental with the recent announcement of the “Ledo Road” project, is this picture of the first Catholic Sunday Mass ever held out in the mountains, along the torturous, winding highway, Oct. 10.    Men from several units of this jungle neighborhood gathered to hear Father Edmund Fleming, Army Chaplain, of Worcester, Mass., say a late afternoon mass, as the lengthening shadows indicate.    Eddie Pepper, of Cleveland, Ohio, played a portable field organ which was loaned for the occasion by a Protestant Chaplain “down the road.” Jimmy McCoy, also of Cleveland, served the priest at mass.    Heretofore, out in the hills, the only Catholic services were those held, twice a month, on weekdays, on visits from Father Louis J. Meyer, of Philadelphia, who would travel out along the road as far as weather and conditions would permit.

This has been condensed from the actual CBI Roundup, the entire issue can be read HERE.

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CBI Roundup Humor – 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Irwin Allred – Salt Lake City, UT; USMC, WWII, CBI & Korea

Bernard Berg – Bronx, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO, 1st Lt., Purple Heart260637844_god_bless_them_all_xlarge

Thomas Crabtree – Calumet, AL; US Army, WWII, ETO, Lt. (Ret.)

David Jesser – Albuquerque, NM; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO

George Levasseur – Sydney, AUS; RA Army 19 years, WWII

Alfred Mendenhall – Aurora, OR; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 187th/11th Airborne

James Miller Jr. – Bayonne, NJ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI, pilot/Korea, Colonel

Stephanie Rader – Poughkeepsie, NY; US Army WAC, WWII, OSS field agent, ETO

Ira Weinstein – Chicago, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, 445th Bomb Group, B-24 bombardier, POW

Ernest Yazhe – Naschitti, NM; USMC, WWII, PTO, Navajo Code Talker

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on February 11, 2016, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 45 Comments.

  1. We realize that all news reports had some level of exaggeration and propaganda but Japanese and Nazi “news reports” were extreme and one sided as you know. The one mentioned is a prime example. Now the news media today… Whoa.

    Liked by 1 person


  2. Thank you lieber Freund ein gutes Wochenende für dich Umarmung Gislinde

    Liked by 1 person

  3. More quite amazing snippets of history …

    Like

  4. Loved the story about Lucky Bob! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Excellent Post and incredible pictures. Great post!

    Like

  6. All sides lied about their successes, it would be disastrous not to, but incredible photos like this show the truth behind the claims. How lucky he was, and like many war photographers, in the wrong place at the right time!

    Liked by 4 people

  7. It’s amazing they were able to get these photos and that these photos made it to press and survived. We forget how difficult it was given the technology of the time. These guys worked very hard to get and process these photos.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Bob was one lucky photographer. Amazing he survived that attack and still got photo. Wow!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Those pesky facts interfere with the narrative all the time, don’t they. Love the picture of the airfield.

    Like

  10. That was a lucky shot of the airfield indeed. And we are all lucky too, that we did not have to endure all those years of war. Blogs like yours serve to remind us, and to hopefully stop such things happening again.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Mr Bryant was a very brave man. How he deserved his photograph of the bombs exploding along the side of the runway. In the Falklands War, the Avro Vulcan dropped all its bombs, not along the runway, but at an angle to make sure at least one hit the runway. And it did! Just one bomb caused a huge hole making the runway unusable.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Mr Bryant was a very brave man. How he deserved his photograph of

    Liked by 1 person

  13. The Roundup Website is impressive.

    Like

  14. I always find it important to read your excellent postings. Ordinary citizens were tragically misled by lies of the military and government leaders during the war time, and we must try never to allow it happen again. Thank you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I went through a bunch of “CBI Roundups” a few years ago. This was quite a story. The photographer, Bob Bryant’s, pucker factor meter had to have been pegged.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Excellent Post GP. I just wanted to take a minute and say how much I appreciate your blog. Remembering History is Key to a nations Survival!

    I also wanted to let all your readers know that Netflix this month has an awesome WW2 6 part mini-series called “The Heavy Water War” it tells the same story as the 1965 film “The Heroes of Telemark” with Kirk Douglas and Richard Burton.

    This is a VERY important part of WW2 history that folks need to remember: Hitler was well on his way to building a atomic bomb if it had not been for the bravery of those SOE Norwegian Resistance Fighters who destroyed the heavy water facility.

    Liked by 2 people

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