Waitangi Day 2016

Treaty-Of-Waitangi

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For those who are unaware, the significant date marks 176 years since the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, when representatives of the British Crown met with more than 500 Maori chiefs in Waitangi, Northland, to sign what is considered to be New Zealand’s founding document.

Each year in Tauranga, local kaumatua and kuia (elders), supported by rangatahi (young people) and clergy from community church groups, have joined together on Waitangi Day for a dawn service.

In some places around New Zealand, other re-enactments are done as a form of education to younger people of all heritages. Festivals and concerts dominate some centres, and the remaining people tend to soak up the summer weather along the many beaches of New Zealand.

On 6 February, at dawn, a service with a haka (Maori ancestral dance) will be performed at Mount Drury, NZ.

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The service starts with a karakia (blessing) by tangata whenua (people of the land) followed by a community service and open forum, giving participants an opportunity to share their thoughts about Waitangi Day.

Click on images to enlarge.

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New Zealand Military Humor – 

 

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on February 5, 2016, in Current News, Home Front and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 68 Comments.

  1. Those soldiers dont had a comfortable life.

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  2. Thanks for posting about Waitangi Day. When I look at the colonisation of other countries, I am grateful that we have the Treaty, but of course it is not without problems. Maori and English translations and interpretations of the text vary and it has taken a long time for wrongs perpetrated by settlers in the name of the Treaty to be righted. We have a Waitangi Tribunal which has been hearing grievances of Maori iwi (nations) and compensating for the land which was taken from Maori in the 19th century. Nga mihi nui.

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  3. New Zealand is one of my favorite places. The Maori culture is quite interesting, the people friendly, and the country drop dead gorgeous. Thanks GP. –Curt

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  4. An interesting post of history.

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  5. I have never participated in a reenactment but I like the idea of educating young people about traditional rituals.

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  6. Well timed, GP. Our NZ daughter-in-law is visiting today

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  7. I am looking forward to my Monday off too 😀

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  8. Aww, how kind of you, GP, to remember us. Our lovely Governor General has officially opened the new Museum of Waitangi. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11584745 I hope I will be able to visit it one day.

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  9. Thank for a great post on the founding document of NZ! Such a treaty would have done a lot of good here in Canada. Such foresight unfortunately was not present here at the time of the founding nation..

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Wondering here if the military would have seen ceremonies like this while they were in New Zealand. It seemed to have a lot of war activity. I’m guessing they have held these services for many, many years.

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  11. I thought the woman in the bottom photo looked familiar – did a google search and yes – that’s former first lady Laura Bush.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Fascinating and I have been there which makes it more so. Informative. Thank you for posting!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Another indigenous people that we ripped off in the name of civilisation. The Victorians have a lot to answer for, GP.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Every country has had blots in their history – we need to remember and move on to make sure it doesn’t happen again – not like here lately where people feel that erasing the history is better.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Took awhile but found it the tauranga sheet was signed 10 of April -23 of May by 21 chiefs. 🙂

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  15. On Feb 6 only 43 head chiefs signed their names or moko in the presence of 500 or so of their lessers. They then took other copies around nz to get other chiefs to sign. It took till well into early July to get 240 chiefs to sign it.
    There is 9 copies that went round the country gathering the other signatures to Total in all 544.
    So really we need more holidays 🙂

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    • It has always surprised me that Waitangi Day and ANZAC are basically the only 2 celebrated in your area. I should think your military that protects your way of life would deserve more, don’t you?

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      • No, we should find a way so that peace can exist without war. I know I’m delusional but still that would be a day to celebrate. 🙂

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      • In Australia, Australia Day is to celebrate our country and way of life but has grown more divisive over the years. It saddens me but I can see certain points of view. I don’t care if they change the date as long as we then truly resolve to come together as one. ANZAC Day is about remembering the fallen. That one day is good enough for me. However I would like to see the many people who wrap themselves in the flag that day actually think of veterans the rest of the year. It’s become this big show rather than a solemn tribute. That being said money is raised and workplaces are stopped on Remembrance Day as well. I’d be interested to know if Waitangi Day is divisive or celebratory for most NZers.

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  16. A haka is more than a dance. It is deeply woven into Maori culture and is used for many purposes; a challenge, an assertion, and to honour those who have earned respect. There are many different haka – the one used by the All Blacks is the most famous, written by Te Rauparaha, but there are others. The New Zealand Defence Forces have their own. Here’s a video of 2/1 RNZIR Battalion, honouring a comrade who fell fighting in Afghanistan, with their unit haka. It’s incredibly powerful:

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    • You are quite right, Matt, and I should have put in a more detailed explanation or link to such a site. This particular video I have seen before and have been hoping to fit it into the blog here somehow, and I watched it again in honor of the fallen NZ soldiers. Thank you for including it here. It is a powerfully emotional recording.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. You have taught me something new! Thanks for sharing Gail!

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  18. I like the comments also.

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  19. I spent a few years on and off in Waiouru. It’s interesting to observe that in the fifties the whole region was brown tussock grass, nary a tree nowhere … today it’s more lush green grass, trees abound and visitors could be excused for wondering why that main highway is called the ‘Desert Road’. (We also got real snow back in those days … Global Warming has a lot to answer for). 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  20. And we get next Monday off because it falls on a Saturday!!

    Liked by 5 people

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