September 1943 (1)

Minami-Torishima, Marcus Island

Minami-Torishima, Marcus Island

1 September – the Japanese positions on Marcus Island in the mid-Pacific received an early morning attack from US Navy dive-bombers.  The records report that 85% of the enemy’s military installations were destroyed, 2 airstrip severly damaged and 7 aircraft destroyed on the ground.  The US lost 2 fighters and one torpedo-bomber.

This is actually Nov. 24, 1950, but gives you an idea of Mac's bird's-eye view.

This is actually Nov. 24, 1950, but gives you an idea of Mac’s bird’s-eye view.

4-5 September – a part of the 9th Australian Division (veterans of the El Alannein W.Desert Campaign, ETO), and the 41st US Army Division landed just miles from Lae, in the Huon Peninsula, New Guinea.  The next day, MacArthur watched from his B-17 “Bataan” as the 503rd Parachute Regiment (Not yet a part of the 11th A/B Div.), dropped over Nadzab to take the airstrip.

The envelopment of the Huon Peninsula.

The envelopment of the Huon Peninsula.

12-16 September – The Australian 3rd Division and 17th Brigade broke out of Wau, going toward Salamura and Nassau Bay.  Salamura fell on the 12th and Lae fell 4 days later.  This put an important port and airfield in Allied hands.  The New Guinea offensive was now split.  One followed the coastline and the other went inland on a northwest route toward Kaiapat.  This operation threatened to encircle the enemy on the Huon Peninsula.

13 September – a flight of B-24 Liberators and B-25 Mitchell bombers attacked Japanese shipping and ground installations at Paramushiru in the north Pacific.  Four enemy vessels were damaged, but 10 US aircraft were downed after being hit by 25 opposing airplanes.

Nadzab, September 1943

Nadzab, September 1943

Chiang Kai-shek became Chairman and President of the Nationalist Government of China, but continued to show very little interest in fighting Japan.  His relationship with Gen. Stillwell became very tense as the Allied Chief of Staff in the CBI recommended that the Nationalists and Communists troops should join forces to combat the common enemy.

18-19 September – the US began to heighten their air campaign by bombing Tarawa, Makin and Apamama  Island groups in the northern Gilberts and Nauru Island.  Over 200 land and carrier-based aircraft participated.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

38f2a8889e604821fb

"Great road fellas."

“Damn fine road, men!”

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Ralph Cano Jr. – NYC, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO

George Cockram – Box Hill, AUS; New Guinea Volunteer Rifles NG X426 ANGAUUS-Australia-Flags

William Dobell – AUS; RA Army # VX86577, V15014, 2/10 Commando Squad

Walter Heller Sr. Munhall, PA; US Army, WWII, Bronze Star

Jack McGrath – Aenod, MO; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Medical/11th Airborne

Betty Nixon – Sydney, AUS; Australian Army Nursing Service, WWII

Ed Oliver Sr. – Mobile, AL; US Navy, Korea

Francis Piper – Canberra, AUS; # NX126790, WWII, SW PTO

Milt Saunders – Rush City, MN; US Navy, WWII

Leo Turini – Clinton, MA; US Army Air Corps, WWII & Korea

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 14, 2016, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 57 Comments.

  1. My knowledge of WW2 is very limited to the conflict in Europe, how it came to exist, and how it was fought. So to read about the battle in the Pacific is enlightening. Thank you for this breakdown.

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    • My pleasure. The Pacific was the larger and tougher type of war than the ETO, but I think because people were so unaware of these islands, they paid little attention. Most immigrants in the US were from Europe at the time and wanted to know about that and the countries were well-known.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Everett, always learn something new and interesting from your posts. I was a little girl during those times and knew nothing about war history. Only effected by blackouts and food rationing! Have a great week…Chryssa

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Interesting info, humor, and images as usual, GP — thanks so much.

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  4. Excellent post GP, thanks for sharing.

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  5. It is especially interesting to read what was happening the day I was born. Thanks GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’m way off subject here, but the cartoon about the fine roads brought a little story to mind. When I was a student at our one-room school, the county superintendent of schools came out for inspection. Our pot-bellied stove had rusted pipes where you could see the flames from the outside quite easily. His response was, “Nice warm school.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • Too funny, Bev – good analogy for the cartoon! Thanks for sharing that. It sure shows the ‘higher-up’s’ attitude, eh?
      You know I love having people share their stories!!

      Like

  7. You’ll probably like this. There’s a map of the Nadzab raid on the Australian Army website: http://www.army.gov.au/Our-history/History-in-Focus/The-Airborne-landing-at-Nadzab

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  8. Much of interest, here. Those aircraft losses were a bit alarming – I wonder if they were worth it in terms of capacity destroyed.
    Meanwhile politics and policy conflicts complicated matters.

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  9. I also have learned so much reading your blog. Excellent article and loving the kangaroo!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Early September was pretty eventful, wasn’t it? We wrote more about that raid on Nadzab awhile back…or were you planning on doing a reblog already? 🙂

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  11. Thank you ist auch sehr Indersand was du schreibst kann alles lesen habe Übersetzung Gruß und Umarmung Gislinde

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  12. Thank you for another Great Post!

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  13. I couldn’t say it any better than Dan Antion, GP Cox;
    We love learning about the little details that didn’t make it into the history books or movies. You are doing a remarkable job for the history books!
    Love, hugs and fairy dust across the pond from Dina, Klausbernd, Siri and Selma

    Like

    • My Fab Four of Cley have been very loyal here and I greatly appreciate each one of you! There are some (and they know who are) that enjoy learning the history, whether good or bad and I do my best to accommodate.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I love the cartoon with the kangaroo. From what I’ve heard of their occasional ferocity, a kangaroo doesn’t necessarily need a gun! Excellent blogpost, thank you.

    Like

  15. Another busy month across the whole region. Strange that the Chinese Nationalists were not too keen to fight on against the Japanese. Maybe they were hoping the Communists would all get killed instead?
    Best wishes, Pete.

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  16. I love learning about the little details that didn’t make it into the history books or movies. Thanks, as always for your fine work!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Thank you for mentioning my site on your wonderful blog. Honoring those that serve is both a sad and rewarding experience I have every day and between your book and website, it is clear you feel the same way.

    Like

  1. Pingback: Final Tribute: WWII Vets / 2015 | Writing of Kayleen Reusser-Home

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