Nisei in Alaska

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Condensed from Yankee Samurai, by Joseph D. Harrington

With Attu secured, Kiska was next in the Aleutians.  An exercise in total futility ensued.  More than 29,000 US troops and 5,000 Canadian ones were assembled, plus some Eskimos and Alaska Scouts.  Nobuo Furuiye served with the Canadians.

The invasion of Kiska was preceded by a fiasco called “The Battle of the Pips”.  A Fire Controlman who served on the battleship Mississippi during the shoot-up said, “We fired a million bucks worth of ammunition into a rainstorm!”

For the Canadians, the taking of Kiska was a biter blow.  Don Oka was with the Alaska Scouts.  He stood offshore in a ship, listening to the tremendous firing ashore.  Tad Ogawa, Ted Ishida and Shigeo Ito also participated.  All were certain, from the noise, that a battle as bloody as Attu was taking place.

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None was, the Japanese had left.  But, they did leave the Nisei a gift however, a cave full of food with a sign in Japanese that said: “Help Yourself.  This is not poisoned.”  John White’s (Nisei commander) men did not seal the food caves.  Instead, according to Shigeo Ito, “we partook voraciously.  Such things as tsukemono, Mandarin oranges, nori, bamboo shoots, and so forth.”  White said there was “lots of rice, clams, and canned meat.  The Nisei were their own chefs and our intelligence detachment became the most popular unit in the command.”

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Shigeo Ito was among those that returned to the US with some of the prisoners taken at Attu, while the more experienced  men were sent elsewhere.  Yoshio Morita was one left behind, but he didn’t mind.  Yutaka Munakata, head of the translation section at MISLS, expressed gratitude for having “huts to sleep in, warm clothes and wholesome food.”  He had a pretty good idea where Nisei who left Alaska were headed and malaria, dysentery and dengue fever did not inhabit the Arctic.

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Contributed by Pierre Lagacé – video about the Alaskan campaign!!

Excellent addition for this section!    CLICK HERE!!

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WWII female pilots now banned from burial at Arlington Cemetery ____

http://features.aol.com/video/group-heroic-wwii-pilots-are-now-banned-arlington-national-cemetery?icid=aol|carousel|dl1

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Cold Humor –

Sign reads: "TREE - only one on Attu"

Sign reads: “TREE – only one on Attu”

"Are you sure it's worth it, Joe?"

“Are you sure it’s worth it, Joe?”

 

 

 

winter-humor-1

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Farewell Salutes – 

Ronald Abbott – Rutland, VT; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne, G-2 / CIA

Raymond Clark – Wellington, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 4211662, WWII

Thank You Veterans for walking the walk.

Thank You Veterans for walking the walk.

Raymond Delano – Lee, ME; US Army Air Corps, WWII

George Dunn – Ottawa, CAN; RC Navy, WWII, HMCS Antigonish

Calvin Lien – Edwina, MN; US Navy, WWII

Andy Morales – Longwood, FL; US Army, Iraq, Sgt., 143rd Sustainment Cmd., KIA

Frederick Robins – W. AUS; RA Air Force, WWII, Catalina pilot

Isadore Troise – Wilmington, DE; US Army, WWII, ETO, MIA/POW, 16th Cavalry Recon, Purple Heart

Ennis Warren – Mobile, AL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, B-17 top turret gunner

Wayne Watson – Riverside, CA; US Army, Vietnam

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 7, 2016, in First-hand Accounts, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 65 Comments.

  1. Would you have eat it? 🙂

    Like

  2. Gratitude the perfect attitude.

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  3. hello gp cox its dennis the vizsla dog hay dada seems doobyus abowt eeting abandond food wot has a sine on it wot sez it is not poyzond!!! but i wood totaly eet it!!! ok bye

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  4. I liked the “at least we don’t get hurricanes” cartoon. It is so appropriate for today.

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  5. I love this post. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. “WWII female pilots now banned from burial at Arlington Cemetery” Erm, I object, that is just not right..

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  7. That tree was a real survivor, GP. It deserved its sign! –Curt

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  8. Fascinating information about the Nisei. I am gobsmacked over the fact that female WW2 pilots can no longer be buried at Arlington. It seems a decision that was not well thought through.

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    • People tend to forget that the Nisei were involved just about everywhere! I saw the article about the female pilots and exploded – I HAD to include that!! Thanks for visiting, Ann, always a pleasure.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. What a wonderful blog! I love history in general, and any history or stories about the Pacific Theater and Alaska are of special interest to me. I’m proud to have been born at Elemendorf AFB, Anchorage, Alaska in 1953. Thanks for reading my blog which has lead me here!

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    • No problem, Barb! Anyone interested in history is an automatic friend of mine!! Your father’s tribute immediately caught my eye and I’ll be seeing more of your site! Thanks for back-tracking and reading a post of mine.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. The Nissan huts brought back memories. In Australia many of those huts were lived in and many used for migrants after arrival. Our family live in one of those too. Hot in summer, freezing in winter!.

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  11. I guess finding that the enemy had left ahead of your invasion wasn’t all bad. It beats getting shot at.

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  12. Are you saying that those poor guys from Alaska were next headed to the Arctic? They must have felt like they were assigned to the wrong regiment. Brrr!

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    • No, the fellow talking was staying in Arctic weather while the rest were going to the jungles. Those guys were sent everywhere – often off any roster, just temporarily attached to many different units.

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  13. Very interesting as always, Everett! Also love the tree in humor 🙂

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  14. Excellent post on the Aleutian’s GP. Great write-up as always – very informative, Rich.

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  15. Such an interesting post. Thank you. Many times when I come for a visit and read your excellent essays, I am struck by the just sheer large numbers of troops involved in these exercises and war engagements. It came up again today in Yankee Samouri ‘ More than 29,000 US troops and 5,000 Canadian ones were assembled,’ All my best to you and how much I appreciate the service you provide and the quality of the writing.

    Like

  16. That “blizzard” comic is exactly what the wife and I say as we shovel or plow the white stuff to the side. Hoping for very few instances of that this winter.

    Like

  17. I wonder if that poor lonely tree is still there

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  18. The tree comic is perfect. Is it a baobab? It almost looks like one, though I bet the artist was simply aiming for ‘tree’.

    Like

  19. Bless you young man, not only is your site immensely enlightening, entertaining, valuable, amusing at times, …it is a gift for us! Much love, Hollly

    Liked by 2 people

  20. The Pacific Theater is such a rich treasure trove of history and sacrifice. Have you read the account of Louis Zamperini called Unbroken? Thank you for highlighting the service and dedication of great Americans.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Always interesting to read about the involvement of Japanese Americans during WW2, GP.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Thank you, Angel.

    Like

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