May 1943 (3) + Japanese Diary

Australian Hospital ship, Centaur

Australian Hospital ship, Centaur

12-25 May – Churchill and FDR attended the Trident Conference of Allied war leaders in Washington D.C.  They then retreated to “Shangri-La” (now known as Camp David), while the military heads continued their heated debates.  Despite American assurance of retaining the “Germany First” policy, the British insisted that the Pacific was diverting too much away from Europe.  FDR, this time, did not bow to Churchill’s demands and the US would dictate the Pacific policy.

FDR and Churchill at 'Shangri-La' during Trident Conference

FDR and Churchill at ‘Shangri-La’ during Trident Conference

15 May – the Australian hospital ship HMAS Centaur, clearly marked as a medical vessel, was torpedoed and sank off the Brisbane coast.  More than 260 people were lost; there were only 63 survivors.

31 May – American and Chinese aviators shot down 20 Japanese fighters in a short aerial battle over Ichang, Hunan Province.

images

The restoration of the American flag over Attu brought a renewed furor in the United States for MacArthur to run for president in the 1944 election.  The general backed out of the political scene, but used the homeland views to renew his call for heavier action in the Pacific.  Adm. King was in agreement.  Churchill became anxious began calling FDR once again on a regular basis.

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I have left this post shorter than most to give you time to read – Diary of a Japanese Army Doctor, who died on Attu, May 1943

Introduction by Rodney A. Smith

The following is an accurate transcription, including spelling errors, of the US Army’s
translation of a Japanese diary found on a dead Japanese doctor after the Battle of Attu, Alaska.
I found this document in my mother-in-law’s papers after she died, so I do not know how she got it,
but she lived in Alaska during WWII, and her husband was in the Army.

Additional notes are found in the right margin and at the end of this webpage along with a map of the battlefield.

Rod Smith

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Brrr – Cold Humor – winter-humor-1

wakeup

WAKE UP !!!!

funny-cold-weather-quotes

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Donald Crossett – Washington Iowa; US Army (Ret. 26 years), WWII, ETO

Silverio D’Arco – brn: Ponza, Italy, Neshanic, NJ; US Navy, Korea, USS Essex, Fighter Sq. 73

John Estelle – Port Jefferson, NY; US Armywpid-20b396344abfbc2aaf8553562b9bb75a

Eugene Hilfiger – Troy, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 675th Artillery

John Jones – Yucaipa, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 457th Artillery

Francis Lander – Macquarie Park, AUS; RA Army, Vietnam, 8 Field Ambulance

Christy Romero – Denver, CO; US Army, WWII, ETO,157th Inf. Div.

Vard Roper – Orem, UT; US Army, Korea, 187th Reg.

Charles Sharp – Whangaret, NZ; RAF # 157688, WWII, F/Lt.

Gale Tye – Griswold, IA; US Navy, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 5, 2015, in First-hand Accounts, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 70 Comments.

  1. Very interesting post gp, the sinking of the Centaur was one of the greatest and blatant atrocities of the war, Miriam Bullwinkle was the last living survivor, she passed away a few years back.
    The Doctors diary shows the pressure the Japanese were under also, however I question the complete allegiance to the Emperor, in that a Doctor would grenade his own patients for the glory of Japan.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Found the diary especially interesting as my son just purchased a Civil War diary, which he wants me to turn into a short historical story. It’s very interesting to see the spellings and word usage of long ago.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is amazing how it changed over the years with barely a notice. Nowadays we only seem to recall a change in our slang – the bee’s knees into neat-o into rad into awesome, etc……
      That diary must be a great read!!

      Like

  3. Thank you so much for sharing the Diary Entry. My husband in particular is interested in the hidden facts surrounding the Pacific Theatre. I forwarded the entries to him to read too. Its always eye-opening to read first hand experiences.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. War is hell and only personal accounts like these can remind us of what it is really like. Hollywood glamourizes it way too much!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I think that I remember reading somewhere that the Eisenhower’s changed the name of the presidential retreat from Shangri-La to Camp David in honor of their grandson who was named David.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I love the photograph of FDR and Churchill. The moment turned them into great men.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This is the first time I read that MacArthur planned to run for president… 🙂

    Like

  8. Interesting as always, GP. Love your “cold” humor! We could use a bit of cooler temps here, eh?! 😀

    Like

  9. That journal is really interesting. Thanks for sharing it

    Liked by 1 person

    • I always consider myself lucky to have discovered something like this among the billions of websites out-there in hard-copy and cyberspace. I appreciate you reading.

      Like

  10. Strange and uncomfortable to read someone’s last conscious thoughts, and interesting that they are universal thoughts.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. First of all, I want to thank you for your service and for your site keeping alive memories of others like yourself. Secondly, I’d like to thank you for stopping by my blog and liking today’s post. And lastly, I’d like to encourage you to get in touch with Theresa Anzaldua as she plans additional volumes of history of our service men and women’s stories. You may be of some assistance to her. Please take the time if you are able.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I appreciate and thank you for your comments and suggestion. But, I do not want to mislead you; it was my father was was the Pacific Paratrooper and through him I became wrapped up in the history! I thank you for visiting, your post was certainly my pleasure, and I hope we’ll see you again here soon.

      Like

  12. Very interesting article and I also enjoyed the funnies. Especially the teenager one 🙂

    Like

  13. This was a very interesting read (and I loved the Cold Comics, especially the last one). I’m glad MacArthur didn’t run. I don’t think he was as open-minded as Eisenhower when it came to leadership. I think he was a very good military leader, and he was probably the right guy for the war in the Pacific. I don’t know if he would have been as good in Europe. I think he would have suffered the same fate as Patton. Great on the ground, not so great around the big table.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. The diary was a fascinating read, GP. Thanks for posting. –Curt

    Like

  15. Reblogged this on Janet’s thread and commented:
    The Japanese doctor’s diary is particularly interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. The Japanese diary reminds me of the “Letters from Iwo Jima” movie, directed by Clint Eastwood. This doctor was apparently Christian, so it surprises me he was willing to commit suicide for the Emperor. Their culture is very different from ours.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Your website looks nice!

    Like

  18. Great humor today, GP!!

    Where are the Churchills and Roosevelts when we so desperately need men of forethought and will to lead us now?

    Liked by 1 person

  19. It’s interesting few military heroes (Eisenhower excepted) make it through the presidential race. MacArthur should have been popular.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. The doctor’s journal gives a real insight into the fanaticism that drove the Japanese on. Small wonder that they were so difficult to defeat. Lessons could be learned about the enemies we face today.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. It snowed here this week so the addition of your cold cartoons are very fitting! That penguins best be prepared to run. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Wow. Amazing to read that Japanese journal entry. Thanks for posting.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Thank you for the “Farewell Salute” to Don, he was a soldier, through and through, right up to the day he died. Hooah!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Thank you for including this article.

    Like

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