May 1943 (1)

2 Spitfires take off from an airfield near Darwin.

2 Spitfires take off from an airfield near Darwin.

2 May – Darwin, Australia was bombed by 20 Japanese bombers and Zero fighter aircraft.  This was the 54th airstrike on the country.  The No. 1 Wing RAAF intercepted the enemy planes after the attack and suffered heavy losses.Buildings were damaged, but there were no casualties.  Further data on Australian bombings can be located  here.

5 May – in Alaska,   an 11th Air Force weather reconnaissance airplane over Attu observed a floatplane burning on the water. Fourteen B-24’s, 17 B-25’s, 16 P-38’s, 32 P-40’s, and 5 F-5A’s flew 4 attack missions to Attu and 6 [partly with Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) pilots] to Kiska targets that included Main Camp, a radar site, North and South Head, a runway, and Gertrude Cove installations. Bombs were dropped on Attu installations and fighters strafed and set afire one seaplane and silenced the AA guns.

Dinnertime on Kiska

Dinnertime on Kiska

Japanese forces in Central China began a massive offensive into Hunan Province in an effort to gain territories of rice production.  US commanders that would have liked to put air bases in China were disappointed by intermittent Chinese cooperation with the enemy.

7 May –  5th Air Force B-17’s and B-24’s bombed supply dumps, and other targets at Madang and Madang Airfield.  Meanwhile, Japanese fighters from Wewak were on patrol and intercepted seven B-17s and six B-24s over Madang.  The B-17s reported interception by seven Japanese fighters including two that dropped aerial bombs that missed by a considerable distance. Four B-17s were damaged, one seriously.//

Chindits behind enemy lines, Burma, May 1943.

Chindits behind enemy lines, Burma, May 1943.

7-14 May – in Burma, the British offensive into the Arakan finally collapsed and were driven north.  The Japanese retook Maundau and Buthidaung, which put the Allies back to their starting positions.nventional attacks.  A-20’s hit forces in the Green’s Hill area. On Timor, B-25’s pounded Penfoesi.  The B-17F “Reckless Mountain Boys” 41-24518 was lost.   Returning from a mission to Aru , the RAAF Hudson A-16-116 was lost.

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8 May – as part of the Operation Cartwheel, US Dauntless and Liberator aircraft bombed various enemy installations throughout the Solomon Islands.  Three Japanese destroyers were damaged; one seriously.

 Port Moresby Station Hospital

Port Moresby Station Hospital

9 May –  5th Air Force B-24’s and B-17’s bombed Manokwari, Nabire, Kaimana, Madang Airfield and the Wewak area. B-25’s hit the airfield at Gasmata.

10 May –  the 10th Air Force in Burma had 6 P-40’s bomb and strafe Kwitu, leaving several areas burning fiercely in China.  The 14th Air Force in French Indochina had eight P-40’s fly an offensive sweep against communications in the Nam Dinh and Hanoi areas. Four locomotives and 3 riverboats are destroyed, a train carrying troops and supplies was heavily damaged, and several trucks of troops were destroyed.//

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Rivalry Humor – military-humor-marines-vs-army

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Farewell Salutes – 

Marvin Alderson – Hartford, SD; US Army, ETO, 3rd Armored Division, Signal Corps, Sgt.

Albert Alderton – Tamahere, NZ; British Navy, WWIITaps

Tony Bruno – Gurnee, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-29 gunner

William Halsey III – Huntsville, AL; US Army, WWII, Engineer Amphibian, Major

Joseph Iannuzzi Jr. – Port Chester, NY; US Army, Korea, 2 Purple Hearts, Silver Star

Samuel McNeill – Southern, NJ; US Army, Vietnam, Dental Corps

Francis ‘Fritz’ Reardon, US Navy, WWII

Jordan Spears – Memphis, IN; USMC, Tiltrotor Sq. ’63/Marine Aircraft Group 16, USS Makin Island, pilot

William Tremaine – Wilmington, DE; US Army, WWII & Korea

Joshua Wheeler – Muldrow, OK; US Army, Iraq, Delta Force, Master Sgt., Bronze Stars

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on October 26, 2015, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 77 Comments.

  1. First off, thank you for keeping the memories alive. It was nice to see a post from the Aleutian Campaign! I too write a blog dedicated to my grandfather, R.C.A.F. pilot Robert W. Lynch who served in the Aleutians during WW2. The blog now served as place to educate and honor all who serve there. I feel like it is the least I can do for the sacrifices they made. http://www.floridabeachestothberingsea.com. I actually just returned from a WW2 tour through the Aleutians where I retraced the footsteps of those who fought there. Trip of a lifetime!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your post illustrates just how much activity was going on in that theatre of war during nine days, a monumental logistical and planning headache for those in the higher echelons.
    Was intrigued in the last few lines and will have to find out how they fitted into the scenario.
    The 14th Air Force in French Indochina had eight P-40’s fly an offensive sweep against communications in the Nam Dinh and Hanoi areas.
    Cheers.

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    • These floating docks were quite the accomplishment, weren’t they?!! I’d heard of them used in my later research, but never saw such detailed pictures. Thanks, Ian. I’ve put this in my favorites!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. I am so impressed by the multi-faceted accounts you are giving in these posts. I don’t know if you are drawing from multiple sources and presenting it as one or if you are using sources that cover all areas of the war…but your work is not lost on me…it’s very thorough and quite impressive! 😀 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • I use all types of resources for the information and try to put them in chronological order. I became frustrated years ago when every book I read skipped from one year to the next and then did flashbacks, also very little was written about the middle of the war. Since so much attention, equipment and troops went to the ETO, the historians seem to let 1943 slide and I knew events were going on, so I dug even deeper for them. The way I was taught WWII in school, basically only a small part of the world was involved. I thank you for appreciating my efforts, Mrs P.

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      • I completely understand your frustration. I got the same education and was horrified when, after 17 years of teaching I began discovering what had been left out of the textbooks. I guess they figured it was too gruesome.

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        • I was shocked by what came out of the archives. I was led to believe [by school – not Smitty] that FDR and Washington were both innocent of any wrong doings before and after Pearl and brilliant strategists. What a load of huey!!

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          • Keep ringing the bell of truth, my friend. I am sure that many others are waking up just as we did. Really gives a different perspective of current news…or should I call it spin, cause we know it’s not all of it. 😉

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  4. The Reckless Mountain Boys crew was jumped by six Zeros and ditched the plane along the coast of New Ireland. Of the 8 survivors, 4 were murdered, the other 4 sent to POW camps in Japan. Happily, all 4 of them survived through the end of the war. It’s quite a story.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. GP, Think of you & your website so often I am haunted & on a guilt trip not checking in & following regularly.!!! Your post here covers so many fronts…You never stop to amaze! I guess I am a generalist & spread too thin with things in life & many people. If you are able to make your website your main focus, you are blessed. Every time I see WWII things in the news & newspaper I think of you. Ah, even my VFW magazine! In it I was shocked to read that my Bronze Star from Vietnam is a higher level medal than the Purple Heart….Can that be true? It should not be if so. No greater sacrifice is there than being wounded in combat! May all be well with you, GP, & your great work here. Phil

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very much for thinking of me and the site. Actually I don’t get to spend as much time here as I wish, but I made a commitment to do my best – so I squeeze in what I can. Thanks again, Philip!!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. The Twentysomething Social Recluse

    I love your posts – I always end up learning something new/ Thank you for sharing such an interesting post!

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  7. 1943 and an air assault over Hanoi? I learn so much here. Thanks again, GP!☕️❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    • Back then the entire area was called Indochina, as today we group together the Middle East. France had been in control of the area, but when Japan requested permission to enter, it was granted.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. That Spitfires taking off picture is awesome.

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  9. I had no idea that the Chinese were intermittently working with the enemy. I also hadn’t thought about that Japan would need to expand into China in order to control food. Living in the US, and reading about these events in a history text, I feel it often separates us from the events. I find myself taking an almost scientific approach to history. I really appreciate that you share information that helps to restore humanity into the pages of history.

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  10. Not a very good reflection on the whole panic story of Darwin.

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    • Australia didn’t have very much self-defense left after Churchill took most of it. It would be only too human for the civilian population to be frightened. Even what troops they did have were barely trained yet. I wouldn’t be too hard on them.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Each time I read your blog, I’m overwhelmed by the amount of knowledge you’ve either maintained from years of studying and reading, accounts from others and thousands of hours of research. Thank you for establishing such a steller blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wow, Sheri, I don’t think I’ve ever gotten quite so fantastic a compliment. I don’t even realize just how much I have read until I look over at the library I’ve accumulated and see the links I’ve saved from the internet. But I must add that the readers still come up with info I am unaware of – this war was HUGE!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. It is interesting that Japan and China were at war. Loving the humor section also 🙂

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  13. It always amazes (and disappoints) me, how little I know about the war in the Far East. I didn’t actually know that Australia was attacked! That’s shocking! I have learnt so much through your posts, and my geography is improving too!

    Liked by 2 people

  14. All very interesting! Except, of course, for the Marine jokes. Not down with the Marine jokes. 😉

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  15. Telling the tale on a basis of date rather than place really makes you realise just how much effort was required to beat such a widely scattered, fanatical enemy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • And it is hard to really put the distances apart in perspective. It wasn’t like Europe where one unit could travel and assist another unit. Thank you for making that point, John.

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  16. Great post and excellent writing. Keep up the great work. World War II must never be forgotten. As Tom Brocaw wrote, these men were our “greatest generation.” He was so correct.

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  17. just wanted to thank you for posting all this, I find it very worthwhile to see what was going on elsewhere while my father was in Italy.

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  18. That “Dinnertime on Kiska” photo looks surreal. I wonder what the story is behind all those wrecked planes in one spot.

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  19. Today’s humor quotes age good ones 😊

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  20. Another interesting roundup, GP. It’s easy to forget that Japan and China were still at war all through this, as the Chinese theatre is often overlooked.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I like the Spitfire, so I enjoyed seeing the first photo. Nice post!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Great article…love the quotes! smile!

    Like

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