March 1943 (2)

Indian troops, Arakan Peninsula, Burma

Indian troops, Arakan Peninsula, Burma

17-31 March – The Japanese 55th Division and other units launched a 3-pronged attack on the Arakan Peninsula in Burma.  The Indian troops pulled back and discontinued their offensive.  The Chindits were defeated by massive enemy fighting and this set off an epic journey of 1,000 miles (1600 km) through Burma for the men to reach safety.

Wingate’s retreat, 150 miles of which was in the Irrawaddy, a heavily patrolled area by the 15th Japanese Army under Lt.Gen. Renya Mutaguchi.  The Chindits would lose approximately 500 men during this march.  Gen. Slim called the entire operation “an expensive failure” but the British press dubbed Wingate a hero and calling him the “Clive of Burma.”

Aleutians_Map

27 March – in the Bering Sea, Adm. Hosogaya Boshiro’s escort force of 4 cruisers and 4 destroyers attempted to run reinforcements to the Aleutian Islands.  The Naval Intelligence failed to notify Adm. Charlie “Socrates” McMorris of the enemy’s strength.  McMorris sailed and engaged the Japanese with 2 cruisers and 4 destroyers in a 4 hours battle, 1000 miles south of the Komandorski Islands.  The American ships were older and outgunned, but the Japanese admiral made the error of being overly protective of the transports and both sides lost one destroyer.  The enemy withdrew, apparently low on fuel and ammunition.  The results of the Battle of Komandorski Islands was deemed inconclusive.

The Japanese Imperial Staff in Tokyo was in dispute at this time and New Guinea was chosen as their prime target.  Gen. Imamura at Rabaul and Adm. Yamamoto at Truk were notified of this decision.  The responsibility of clearing the skies of the US 5th Air Force fell upon the Imperial Navy.  Yamamoto and his staff prepared the “Operation I-Go” plan to reinforce their 11th Fleet.

0127-leaders15 (612x640)

28 March – at the Casablanca Conference, the strategic priorities were finalized.  The “Germany First” policy remained set in stone and the Pacific commanders could expect all resources after Europe was taken.  Until that time, they would receive approximately 15% of the resources produced.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Current News – today is Gold Star Mother’s Day

To view my past post for the Gold Star Mothers – click HERE!

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Military Humor – Military_Humor_27

Military-Humor

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Charlie Bostwick – Broad Channel, NY; US Navy, WWII

Tommy Crews – Independence, MO; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBIMissing MAn (800x583)

John Demski – Coeur, IL; US Army Air Corps, 221st Medical/11th A/B

Stanley Konefal – Medford, MA; US Army, Medical Corps, surgeon

Gerald Griffin – San Angelo, LA; US Air Force (ret. 21 years), Korea, Vietnam, TSgt. E-6

Donald Paton – Taukau, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 4313922, WWII

Richard Sheaffer Jr. – Harrisburg, PA; USMC, WWII, PTO, Pfc, KIA

Charles Strong – Suffolk, VA; USMC, Afghanistan, Spec Forces

John Terrell – Oklahoma City, OK; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, gunner, 301 Heavy Bombardment Group, Korea

Koyle Wells – Boise, ID; US Army, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on September 28, 2015, in Current News, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 61 Comments.

  1. 15% of resources… that explains a lot. Love the unread messages.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Doesn’t it though?! I knew they were low on materiel, but the replenishment projections were even worse. This also explains why our home front was so important and ‘Rosie the Riveter’ so highly regarded.

      Like

  2. One thing that always comes out in your posts gp, is the distances traveled by forces on the ground during the various conflicts and battles, in this case the Chindits with their 1,000 miles journey, hard to imagine when today’s soldiers do not have to face such a horrendous trek.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. GP, You are still doing the great job you always do here! Haven’t visited anyone’s website in a long time. Phil

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks so much for all the interesting learning posts. There is so much WWII history that I never knew. Chryssa

    Like

  5. The military humor photos are so much fun! I think that my favorite was the one with the pigeons.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I am really impressed with Adm. McMorris. Even if the battle was inconclusive, holding his own under those conditions is impressive! I also love the picture with the pigeons. Made me giggle 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is difficult to try and judge the results of these battles when you realize just how little they had to work with against a major enemy. Yup, I thought the pigeons pretty cute myself!! Thanks for coming by, Claire.

      Like

  7. Love the ‘unread messages’!
    Ignoring some of the hype the Brits used for propaganda purposes, one still finds that Wingate’s achievement was notable in many respects.
    One really wonders how America was able to cope for so long against a concentrated onslaught while they could only use 15% of the resources that could have been available. Still, one can see the logic in a way.

    Like

    • I find it difficult to try and judge Wingate’s results as he did have much to work with against such a large enemy. But, what logic can you see in a larger war getting only 15% of the new production?

      Like

  8. 15% of the military’s resources devoted to the Pacific. No wonder anyone fighting there was so frustrated with how little they had to keep going.

    Like

  9. sue marquis bishop

    GP;, I so much loved your recent post on the Christmas Eve boxes….! how touching to read… I could just imagine the scene and the eagerness of the men to receive the rations… The humorous photos today make me laugh. You are doing such a great job collecting history so all this can be remembered. Thanks for checking in on my posts… You are usually the first one to check in… Sue and Randy
    womenlivinglifeafter50.com

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Great post! Once again something that I didn’t learn in school. Seems so much I didn’t here about. Better late then never!

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  11. I’d say we didn’t do too bad with those 15% resources.

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  12. It’s always interesting hearing the other side to a story. I enjoy those posts.

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  13. My grandfather was a Chindit and this is a piece of Japanese propaganda that he brought back with him from the Burma campaign: https://alastairsavage.wordpress.com/2014/01/01/japanese-propaganda-from-world-war-ii/

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Love the donkey picture. I learned something new today! Thanks for sharing, GP.

    Like

  15. I loved the photo, GP. The human spirit is amazing — we can manage to smile in times of such adversity. And you cracked me up with the “You have 3 messages” joke. 😀 Hugs.

    Like

  16. I once read a description of Wingate’s expedition as a ‘glorious failure’. Surely only us British could come up with such a contradiction in terms?
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Like

  17. An amazing and exciting post as always.

    Like

  18. It’s hard history to read, but I appreciate your bringing me things I never read about before, at least not with this amount of detail.

    Like

  19. I have heard similar of Montgomery, popular with the press, but not so popular with the troops..

    Liked by 1 person

  1. Pingback: My Article Read (9-28-2015) | My Daily Musing

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