Remembering Korea

The Wall - Washington D.C.

The Wall – Washington D.C.

On this anniversary of the Korean War cease-fire I offer you these 2 poems.  Let these two men represent the people lost in this war.  Within this site are over 40 posts dedicated to the Korean War.

MY FRIEND

By: Shorty Estabrook
In tribute to Ralph Henderson McKinley (1932-1951) POW
21st Infantry Regiment/24th Infantry Division

*

I lost my friend along the way
To this place that I call now.
I didn’t want to lose my friend,
But I did and don’t know how.

I remember how he looked at me
As I laid him down to rest,
When he said, “I can’t go on, old pal;
You’ve seen my very best.”

“So, leave me now and go your way
And when your journey ends,
Remember me beside this road,
Your buddy and your friend.”

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REMEMBERING THE “FORGOTTEN WAR”

By: Shirley Jones Whanger
In honor of: Thomas Dale Jones (DOD 1 January 1951) POW
A Battery/52nd FAB/ 24th Infantry Division
*

If you were asked, “What happened on June 25, 1950,” what would you say?
Do you know what event took place on this historic day?

It was the start of the Korean War, the “Forgotten War,” as it is referred;
When the Communist North Korean invasion of South Korea occurred.

Our brave soldiers, who were shipped out to defend freedom to this foreign land,
Didn’t realize that it would become a three-year stand.

They fought their best and many a supreme sacrifice was made.
How can it be called the “Forgotten War” when a toll like this was paid?

Memories of Osan, Pusan, Inchon, the ‘Death March’ and POW camps,
haunt veterans who fought in that living hell.
To them it’s not a ‘Forgotten War,’ for they remember it well!

The 19 stainless steel statues were sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, VT and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, NY. They are approximately seven feet tall and represent an ethnic cross section of America. The advance party has 14 Army, 3 Marine, 1 Navy and 1 Air Force members. The statues stand in patches of Juniper bushes and are separated by polished granite strips, which give a semblance of order and symbolize the rice paddies of Korea. The troops wear ponchos covering their weapons and equipment. The ponchos seem to blow in the cold winds of Korea.

The 19 stainless steel statues were sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, VT and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, NY. They are approximately seven feet tall and represent an ethnic cross section of America. The advance party has 14 Army, 3 Marine, 1 Navy and 1 Air Force members. The statues stand in patches of Juniper bushes and are separated by polished granite strips, which give a semblance of order and symbolize the rice paddies of Korea. The troops wear ponchos covering their weapons and equipment. The ponchos seem to blow in the cold winds of Korea.

 

Below are some  links to my prior posts on the subject…

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2013/07/27/national-korean-war-veterans-armistice-day/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/03/04/korean-war-final-day/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/03/10/korean-war-statistics/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/05/12/intermission-stories-16/

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Farewell Salutes – 

Milan Ademek – Gardiner, ME; US Army (ret.), WWII, Korea

Kenneth Adams – Seminole, OK; US Air Force, Korea

The Final Farewell

The Final Farewell

Richard Bennett – Milwaukee, WI; US Army, Korea , Vietnam

James Carr – Perrysville, OH; US Navy, Korea

Robert Decker Sr. – Asheville, NC; US Navy, Korea, USS Hank

Richard Francis – Upperco, MD; US Army, Korea

Bob Hernandez – Plant City, FL; US Army (Ret.), WWII, Korea, Vietnam

Walter Nicolson – Apple Valley, CA; US Army (Ret. 21 years), Korea, Vietnam

Bob Panehal – Fairview Park, OH; US Army, WWII, ETO, Medic, 3 Bronze Stars

Harry Wachof – Sodus, NY; US Army, Korea

Thad White – Columbia, SC; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Korea

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on July 27, 2015, in Current News, Korean War and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 63 Comments.

  1. Thank you again for mentioning my grandpa, Bob Panehal, in your salute!

    Like

  2. Only a returned serviceman could write words like that, living tributes written by those who saw firsthand, no poet without a war experience could say so much in so few words.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great post from “Friends” poem to the statues. That is the first time I ever saw those statues. What a great tribute.

    Like

  4. That first poem “My Friend” is really, really powerful in its simplicity.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “My Friend” got to me… What noble words.

    Liked by 1 person

    • ‘A person is rich if he can honestly say that in his lifetime he had one true friend.’ I heard that a very long time ago – believed it then – believe it now. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. What a moving post. Everett. The poems were excellent and it should not be a forgotten war!

    Like

  7. I would like to visit it.

    Like

  8. I have never seen the Korean war memorial. I must say it is beautiful and incredibly sad. Thank you for your diligence in sharing so many intimate moments of those who sacrificed for this nation.

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  9. Fine words and a very fine post in honour of the sacrifice that these brave men gave without a word. I agree with Dan above, thanks to people like you, Korea need not be forgotten, Thank you for such a moving post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • After all they went through, Rich, I feel it an obligation to keep all the memories alive. I hope I instill enough of this thought into someone who will continue after I’m gone!!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Hard to understand how a war fought to protect an invaded nation should be ‘forgotten’. Surely this was nobler than the current practices of turning a selective blind eye to invasions and genocides?

    Like

  11. The poems were wonderful, as were the pictures of Korean War memorials around the world. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Very moving post, GP Cox; poems, sculptures and image. Thank you for not letting us forget. It’s so good to know how you are paying this soldiers a tribute. ❤
    Love and a big hug across the pond to you and yours,
    Dina & co Xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dina & Co.
      Thank you so much for your lovely comment. After what these troops went through – how can it not be my obligation to keep their memories alive?! I appreciate how loyal you and yours have been to this site. ❤
      GP Cox

      Liked by 1 person

  13. The first time I saw this memorial was at night in December. I’ve been to it at other times as well, but have decided that the best time to experience the Korea War Memorial is at night with the ghostly lights shining up and a light snow falling.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Thank you so much for continuing to keep these warriors – men and women – in the forefront of our consciousness. We owe them so much.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Wow, such wonderfully loud love and respect in these statues and monuments! What a delight to see such human gratefulness expressed with such devotion to details that evoke and stir emotions. Thanks for posting this gp, I hadn’t seen most of these until now.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Great tribute, GP. The Korean War section at The Mall means a lot to me. My dad fought in the KW as a UDT for the Navy. I like the statues. Thanks for sharing the poems. Cease fire! Awesome sound to that.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Never a “forgotten” war. My father spoke of it often. He was a fog man, sent in to scope out a secure drop site. One of nineteen. He gave me a small book he held under his suit, protected from water. It identified known edibles, roots, food sources. He was one of nineteen that swam into the area on a night drop.

    I wish I could remember more and I’d give anything to still have that small book. Somewhere along the twenty odd relocations within my child and adult life, I’ve misplaced it.

    We NEVER forget our own. They are our Freedom Walkers!

    Thank you, GP!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Another outstanding post! I echo your fine tribute to the heroes of the forgotten war, thank you for reminding your readers. It would help if you could do a tribute more than just once per year. By the way i will be posting a new post this week.

    Like

    • You would think our school systems would make certain to teach about this war too. It was a UN venture and memorials are in each nation involved – yet – it is STILL the Forgotten War. Glad to hear you’ll be posting again soon, Kevin.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. An outstanding collection of memorials, GP. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Those statues are an unforgettable sight. I have been there twice in the past two years and they just stop me in my tracks. Great post. We should never forget.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I told Norma (Through My Eyes) that no matter which memorial you go to, take a handkerchief!! The fact that they represent so many – the statues seem to come alive. Thanks for coming!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Thank you GP. You started this and every time you bring up another memory. Horrific and wonderful at the same time.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. A touching post GP, we must never forget. I like the 19 stainless steel statues. I hope to see them one day.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Moving personal tributes GP. Those men are remembered with fondness.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. You’ve honored these soldier with you coverage , so a “forgotten ” war is not forgotten .Thanks.

    Liked by 2 people

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