Americus, Georgia, 1941

Pierre not only found this photo, more information was discovered and is in his later posts! Enjoy!!

RAF 23 Squadron

There are very few pictures of a PT-17 flying over Americus, Georgia, in 1941. I had found one yesterday. It was before December 7th, 1941.

Rare picture indeed…

Robert F Shay Jr

It was posted on this page of this Website. I had to contact the webmaster.

Glad I did.

This is the original rare picture of a PT-17 flying over Americus, Georgia.

PT17

Primary Flight Instructor Robert Shay Jr was teaching a young cadet to fly it. 

Flight Instructor Shay

Robert F. Shay Jr

The young cadet has to be a young RAF recruit training in Americus, Georgia, like Theodore Griffiths DFC.

PT-17 in the background

Unknown instructor with Theo Griffiths

Stephen Shay was kind enough to send me some pictures with this message…

Pierre,

My dad was a US Army flight instructor stationed in Americus, GA from 1940-1941. He went down there from a small airfield he and others hewed out of an old orchard in Penn Yan, NY…

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Posted on July 2, 2015, in Home Front, WWII and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 30 Comments.

  1. Just a treasure trove of excitement every time I visit! There are so many service folks that would LOVE to discover your site.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m always out there trying to locate them – give the ip address out to anyone you think would like to read and be part of our friendly little group here. I’m glad I fond you!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. HAPPY WEEKEND 🙂

    Like

  3. I enjoy reading your blog enormously, and you are a treasure chest of information. Have you considered writing a book? I think you have a built in audience for it.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you very much, Charles. I have thought about it, but I believe I would need far too many permissions to re-print for it to be worthwhile. When I request the right to publish on this blog – they figure what harm will a blog do [and I am NOT profiting by it – shucks!], so they say to go ahead. My library of books was just increased with 4 more this week and the bibliography I am way behind on seems endless – so in short – No, no book I’m afraid, but thanks again for the vote of confidence.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wonderful old photos! 🙂

    Like

  5. Great pieces of history gp, rarely do we get to see pictures that are hidden away in family albums.
    Each and every one portraying a unique part of the war years.
    Thanks for the share.

    Like

  6. That is a rare find and glad that Pierre found it. Also glad that you re-posted it!

    Like

  7. georgiakevin

    I always enjoy your work but since I live just 18 miles from Americus this is especially interesting for me. The airfield that the PT 17 flew from was called Souther field. It is now called Jimmy Carter Regional Airport. Charles Lindbergh bought his first plane and flew solo here as well. Americus is just 8 miles from a civil war prison and national cemetery where most of 13,000 prisoners are buried along with men and women who fought in wars since then. There is at least one who died in the revolutionary war and war of 1812 that were of course re interred there after the civil war. There is also one of the few POW museums there too.

    Like

    • Small world, eh? I had no idea you were that close. Thank you, Kevin. A great deal of extra data here is welcome and I appreciate you taking the time to include here for everyone.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I have very good reason to love planes of that vintage. After WW2, in which my father was a pilot and my mother served in the WAAFs, I was taught to fly in my father’s Hornet Moth which was very like that, or like a Tiger Moth but with a cabin. This stood me in good stead when recently editing a novel set just before and during the war, with flying sequences.

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  9. What an amazing world. Thanks for the images.

    Like

  10. My paternal grandfather taught flying in WW1

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  11. Pierre Lagacé

    Théo is still living although in poor health.
    We owe a lot to these men.

    Like

  12. Nice recollections GP, and very good photos too.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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