ANZAC Centenary

James Charles Martin (1901-1915), youngest Australian KIA at Gallipoli

James Charles Martin (1901-1915), youngest Australian KIA at Gallipoli

Anzac Centenary

Between 2014 and 2018 Australia and New Zealand will commemorate the Anzac Centenary, marking 100 years since their  involvement in the First World War.

Gallipoli today

Gallipoli today

The Anzac Centenary is a milestone of special significance to all Australians and New Zealanders.  The First World War helped define them as a people and as nations.

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During the Anzac Centenary they will remember not only the original ANZACs who served at Gallipoli and the Western Front, but commemorate more than a century of service by Australian and New Zealand servicemen and women. [And I hope other nations will as well.]

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The Anzac Centenary Program encompasses all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations in which they have been involved.   And to honour all those who have worn the uniforms.  The programs involved with the Centenary urge all to reflect on their military history.

 

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Please take the time to visit my older ANZAC post to honor these men further –    https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/anzac-day/

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Humour – Keeping their spirits up back in the day – 

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Farewell Salutes –

James Cameron – Howick, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 412996, WWII

Remembrance

Remembrance

Peter Carter – Kilmore, AUS; RA Air Force (Ret.), WWII, Wing Commander

Thomas Davis – Thames, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 424644, WWII, Cpl.

Alexander Godwin – Sydney, AUS; RA Air Force, 7th Apprentice Intake

Henry Hubbert – Auckland, NZ; QSM # 197041, WWII

Alfred Hudson – NZ; Royal Navy # C/SSX 16068, WWII, ETO

Lawrence Layzell – Napier, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 41739, WWII

Eric Maxton – Albany, AUS; RA Air Force, 460 Squadron

Roger Murphy – Mitchell, AUS; RA Air Force (Ret.), 78th Fighter Wing

Neil Taylor – Hamilton, NZ; L/Cpl # 457137, WWII

ode

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 25, 2015, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 114 Comments.

  1. We were watching WWll films today. Do you know who “Kilroy” was? Or who started “Kilroy was here.”?

    Like

    • There are a number of Kilroy stories, one being that he was a soldier who shipped out supplies overseas and used the design as his own inspection mark. From there the stories stretch to both wars across both oceans to the point where no one really knows for certain WHAT the truth is!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • THANKS, I thought it was a newspaper man in the war and he started signing his stories or something. We may never know. I wish I could remember. I do remember seeing it on walls when they showed the war news in the movie hall. I was 7 when WWll ended. Since there was no TV, before every movie, they always showed the latest films (cleaned up for kids of course) especially when our troops were going back into France, etc.
        Thanks again, Connie

        Like

  2. Was it common that they would send such young lads into war as James Charles Martin?

    Like

  3. Reblogged this on Waltzing Australia and commented:
    I have written a number of times about the ANZACS, both on this blog and in my book. You can do a search if you want more details. I came across this post and was reminded that it is, indeed, 100 years since the ANZACS landed at Gallipoli and became legends.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Wonderful blog. Heard about it. Will enjoy reading more about

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks gpcox for highlighting our special day of remembrance Anzac Day . At Gallipoli 8000 Australians lost their lives and 2500 Kiwis. In the Western Front in France 46000 Aussies were killed .At that time our total population in Australia was only 3 million . So by comparisons ,our contribution was huge . Here huge crowds have been coming out to our parades in all cities , which augurs well for the future.

    Thank you once again
    Ron

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve been hearing that each year the crowds get larger and makes me feel great to know that more and more are looking into and remembering their history! Good to see you, Ron.

      Like

  6. percetakanexpres

    Your website is very simple and you publish articles very useful for many people 🙂
    How do you think of my blog?

    Thank you

    Like

  7. What irks me are the liberals, neo-liberals and political hypocrites that do not acknowledge those Braves (men and women) who risked their lives and many sacrificing their lives so that the world can be free of oppression and exploitation.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. What a wonderful tribute!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Thank you for remembering us. I also attended a dawn service in a small country town where many people are inter-related. I hope to do a post later today.

    Liked by 2 people

    • My pleasure, Gwen! Those are all men who fought for our freedoms! I’ll look forward to seeing your post on the dawn service.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi GP, as you know, that post is up now, and thank you for your like. It is outside your current range of the Pacific Theatre, however, if you wanted to, please feel free to re-blog it. You have many more followers than me. I did receive lovely comments from two of the bloggers who came on board with me after you had featured my Catalina posts. Anyway, I’ll leave that with you to decide as you see fit.

        Like

        • You do such excellent work on your posts, Gwen, but not just at this time. I notice you don’t have a Search bar on your site, so I’ll ask – Do you have any about homelife during WWII in the Pacific?

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          • I nearly said ‘No’ until I remembered my very, very, first post: The Catalyst For Retirement May 1, 2013. Take a look and see if it fits. It might not, or only half of it might. While you are at it, you might like to take a look at the next one, posted the same day, headed Famous Last Words (nothing to do with military). I was such a newbie, I somehow managed to “like” my own post. Dohhh. In any case, your comment prompted me to look at the Widgets and add a “Search”. I wondered myself why I couldn’t find old post subjects easily. I removed a couple of other widgets while I was at it. In the next couple of months I need to get co-ordinated with my social media so that it ties in with my upcoming book. So I may change this blog theme altogether – I am using Twenty Twelve. Do you have a favourite?

            Like

            • I’ll check things out, especially now that you made it easier. And I know what you mean about being a newbie – I managed to like a few of my own in error, I think when they were reblogged and brother was I embarrassed when I received THAT email notification from wordpress. I enjoy your site, but if you want to change it, take your time – they literally have a ton of them now! Okay – I’m off the see the wizard – oops – the search bar…. O_o

              Liked by 1 person

  10. I want the cool winds of April to carry with him my warmest thoughts and in my soul spring blossom into a smile on your face and a fericeasca you even for a moment!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Thank you for this – great information and a tangible reminder that our military sacrifices are shared by generous and courageous troops from msny countries. God bless our Aussie comrades and their families.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for that tribute gp, much appreciated by all those who are relatives of those soldiers, and by those who remember our past with reverence.
    Quite a conundrum in that last cartoon mate, must be a touch of truth in it I think.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Saturday 25 April was so amazing and so beautiful here in Australia, gp – not a single household is left untouched by the moving commemorations held everywhere from dawn. So proud to have been a part of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Heroes every one. My appreciation of these lads efforts is not fading, and never will.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I have never heard of ANZAC day. Thanks, Robert.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I suppose I should have clarified – Australian-New Zealand- Army- Corps. As Americans have Veteran’s, Memorial, Marine Birthday, Navy Day, Airborne Day, Pearl Harbor Day, etc. They have ANZAC Day, a huge event honored in every major city and the military performs and attends functions planned around the world this year.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Reblogged this on LordBeariOfBow and commented:
    This man, gpcox does us proud. HE never forgets!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. It will be interesting to see how Russell Crowe’s new film on Gallipoli will stack up historically. Not many are saying much.

    The one that Mel Gibson was in, so long ago now, was felt to be accurate enough to be shown in high schools history classes around the world.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I hope the movie industry has learned its lesson on accuracy from other movies. If the Gibson version was good enough to be used by the school system, I fail to see why there’s a remake…. Any personal thoughts on the matter?

      Liked by 2 people

      • Yes, I always, always, always question the historical accuracy of any film. Most do not cut it. In consideration of war dramas, I can only think of three in which veterans or other survivors have said that the films were extremely accurate: 1) Schindler’s List – Spielberg, 2) Saving Private Ryan – Spielberg again and 3) Platoon, and that’s because Oliver Stone was a Vietnam vet who relied on much of his personal knowledge and experiences to write the script and make the film.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Very true, Allan. I can only sit back and laugh at all the romance that Hollywood loves to put into the wars – like the men actually have the time between all else they have to do to stay alive.

          Liked by 1 person

  18. It has always puzzled me that the Australian and New Zealand moment of remembrance flows around the day when forces from both countries landed on an enemy coast. It had a lot to do with self-validation, as opposed to being a mere colony of Britain and has since been thoroughly entwined in national identity. In many ways, certainly for New Zealand, Anzac Day is more a day to celebrate nationalism than Waitangi Day, our actual national day. As always with history, the name itself was happenstance; a clerk, tired of writing out the name of the combined corps, had the initials made into a rubber stamp late in 1914. It took off.

    I covered the Gallipoli centenary on my blog, including the moment of remembrance on 25 April – yesterday, as I write this: https://mjwrightnz.wordpress.com/2015/04/25/lest-we-forget-a-moment-to-remember-in-an-autumn-dawn/

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for the link, everyone of your posts is an enjoyable lesson. I had previously seen the post, but this visit, I left a comment [sorry I do not always have the time to do so], now even those who are unaware of your site can receive an intro into your writing.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Glad that these troops are remembered in their homeland. The cartoon sent shivers down my spine realizing how the battle never ends.

    Liked by 1 person

    • These commemoration day posts are sad ones, remembering the multitudes that have passed. Most people have notice the irony in the cartoon, but your whole different perspective now has chills going down my spine – all too true! I thank you so much for taking the time to share your thoughts.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I have lived long enough to remember when WW1 and Gallipoli were still in recent memory of most of the adults I came into contact with. That, and being alive during WW2, has given a closer perspective than most people celebrating will have – and I hope there is a fair emphasis on those earlier campaigns as well as all the more recent stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Great post. My experience visiting the graves of relatives lost on the Western Front. Lest We Forget.

    https://deanoworldtravels.wordpress.com/2012/06/28/australian-heroes-at-rest/

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Another example of Churchill’s inept warmongering leading to disaster for the ordinary working man.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Thank you so much for this post GP. We will never forget them.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Reblogged this on Pickled Wings and commented:
    Today is ANZAC Day in Australia and New Zealand. This year, it is all the more poignant as it is also the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the Gallipoli Campaign; the baptism of fire for the armies of both nations the results of which would change forever how the two nations saw themselves on the world stage.

    To this day, historians are still divided on the Gallipoli Campaign and the full scope of its ramifications. What is not in debate, in the context of the land campaign, is that the Allied effort was plagued by logistical and tactical deficiencies at every level as well as overconfident commanders who sent inexperienced soldiers up against an adversary they had woefully underestimated the abilities of.

    To my Australian and New Zealand readership; I bow my head and raise a glass to your veterans, living and departed. Thank you.

    Happy ANZAC Day.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. I was born 1945. I struggle to find some words…at last. A long long time ago, there was ” country before self…for the 2 wars to end all wars. Unfortunately due to human nature, political and corporate leaders now see it as ” self before country ” …..negating the intense sacrifices of soldiers and their loved ones.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. That cartoon links Gallipolli and Iraq very nicely.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. I think of these heroes who were the contemporaries of our grandparents and great-grandparents. It makes one pause in awe.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. That cartoon illustrates it all better than a million volumes by a thousand philosophers. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  29. We will honor them today too… no one is forgotten.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Yes the cartoon is gold, thanks, another bloody useless ongoing war…sad to say. But thanks to those over there, apparently not actually fighting, just training, so our government tells us….hmmmmm.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Thank you so much for your post about the ANZACs….we will always remember them with pride and respect. Yes many countries were represented at the ANZAC day services today, especially at Gallipoli in honour of the 100 years of the landing there. You are always so thoughtful and thanks again.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Thanks GP. This is a lovely, thoughtful tribute with a super choice of photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Anzac took the casualties and Turks won the theater but Britain and France won the war chopping up Ottoman Empire to their advantage.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes. For this piece of land that no one wanted – these men entered, knowing their probable fate – the description of courage.
      [and once again, the Commonwealth their part for the UK]

      Liked by 2 people

  34. Pierre Lagacé

    Reblogged this on Lest We Forget and commented:
    Never forget why wars are fought for…

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Pierre Lagacé

    I hope people understand the irony…

    So bloody true.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Reblogged this on Tribalmystic and commented:
    Thank you for sharing this post.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. Great post — you found some wonderful art too !

    Liked by 1 person

  38. Thank you. Lest we Forget

    Liked by 1 person

  39. I appreciate the troops and your efforts.

    Liked by 1 person

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