June 1942 (6) – Tribute

 

Flying into Sand Island, Midway Atoll

Flying into Sand Island, Midway Atoll

Admiral Yamato ordered Nagumo into a night battle with the American ships.  US Admiral Spruance knew the enemy was out there, but felt he shouldn’t venture too far from Midway Island.  This decision ultimately avoided the trap the enemy had set and ultimately led to the following decision….

The Japanese Combined Fleet’s flagship signaled out at midnight, “MIDWAY OPERATION IS CANCELED.”  This massive defeat for the enemy was only worsened when 2 of Admiral Kurita’s force collided with each other.  The IJN Mogami was damaged and the Mikuma sank from further air attacks.

The result of the Battle of Midway was a definite shift of balance of the naval power in the Pacific.   The Japanese Combined Fleet of 145 vessels had burned more fuel for this operation than the entire Imperial Navy had used in the previous year.  The enemy had lost 4 carriers, 1 cruiser, 234 planes and 2,200 men KIA. (other resources list up to 292 planes and 2,500KIA).

Marine muster on Midway

Marine muster on Midway

The US had lost one carrier, USS Yorktown, hit by the Japanese submarine I-168, 1 destroyer, 145 planes and 305 KIA.  All this for 2,000 acres of Pacific coral.  There will be more on the USS Yorktown in the Eye Witness Accounts to follow.

Click on images to enlarge.

******

Captain Daniel J. Hennessy, USMC 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Captain Hennessy (20 May 1914 – 4 June 1942) was one of the VMF-221, F2A-3 Brewster Buffalo pilots that was downed during the Battle of Midway.  His family would later receive his Navy Cross.  The citation that accompanied the medal read:

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Captain Daniel J. Hennessy (MCSN # 0-5356), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service in the line of his profession while serving as Executive Officer and a Pilot in Marine Fighting Squadron TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE (VMF-221), Marine Air Group TWENTY-TWO(MAG-22), Naval Air Station, Midway, during operations of the U.S. Naval and Marine Forces against the invading Japanese Fleet during the Battle of Midway on 4 June 1942.

VMF-221

VMF-221

“Leading his squadron in a dauntless and aggressive attack against a vastly superior number of Japanese bomber and fighter planes, Captain Hennessy aiding in disrupting the plans of the enemy and lessening the effectiveness of their attack, thereby contributing materially to the success of our forces. As a result of his courageous and daring tactics and because of the circumstances attendant upon this engagement, there can be little doubt that Captain Hennessy gallantly gave up his life to the service of his country. He displayed the characteristics of a fine leader and excellent airman in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service”

 

Capt. Hennessy’s full story can be found by CLICKING HERE! , along with more stories of his fellow airmen.

vmsb241

His nephew, Dan Hennessy at it kind of got away from you, has been a long time fellow blogger of ours and a friend.

a2285af50d7770447eceecc82f726073

################################################################################

Political Humor of the day ______

Please, forget Pearl Harbor!, Ogden Standard Examiner, 12 June 1942

Please, forget Pearl Harbor!, Ogden Standard Examiner, 12 June 1942

The Midway Punch, Sheboygan Press, 9 June 1942

The Midway Punch, Sheboygan Press, 9 June 1942

################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Bodington – Juno, FL; US Navy, WWII, PTO, SeaBee

Lionel Cloutier – Ottawa, CAN; RC Air Force, Captain, MP

Chester Cox – Abilene, TX; US Army, WWII, PTO; Korea

Missing Man formation

Missing Man formation

Albert Fraser – Waipawa, NZ; RNZ Navy # 11689, Korea

John Hite – Fairbanks, AK; US Army, Lt.Col.(Ret.), Vietnam, Purple Heart, Silver Star

James Irwin Jr. – McKeesport, PA; US Air Force, Colonel (Ret. 32 years)

Wilford “Buck” King – Hutchinson, KS; US Army, WWII, CBI

Henry Mills – Windsor, VT & NY; US Army, WWII, Purple Heart

Edna Morgan – Rincon, GA; civilian aircraft spotter, Aircraft Warning System

Fred Neupert Jr. – Montgomery, IL; US Army Air Corps, Sgt., WWII, ETO

Edwin “Dan” Parke – Boca Raton, FL; US Army, WWII

Irwin Wiesenthal – NYC, NY; US Army, WWII

################################################################################

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on March 9, 2015, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 47 Comments.

  1. Reblogged this on Windows into History (Reblogging and Links) and commented:
    Suggested reading – a fascinating website. Reblogged on Windows into History.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on quirkywritingcorner and commented:
    For some odd reason, it seems that wars fought back then made more sense than what we see today. Back then you knew who your enemy was.

    Like

    • Being “politically correct” didn’t begin until the Korean War [when we started fighting with one hand behind our backs]. Before then, we went into a war to win it. I cringe and pray for every deployed soldier today. Thank you very much for the re-blog.

      Like

  3. Greetings from Belgium, visit my weblog on: https://koivis.wordpress.com/

    Like

  4. Reblogged this on itkindofgotawayfromyou and commented:
    Thanks to fellow blogger gpcox for this tribute to my uncle posting during his well-researched stories about the Pacific war .

    Like

  5. Would be interested in all the details that went behind Yamamoto’s decision to cancel the Midway Operation, there must have been many factors taken into consideration to reach that decision.
    Cheers

    Like

    • Well, it might have the loss of 4 aircraft carriers on top of destroyers being out of commission or the tons of planes that were burning and sinking into the ocean – but I think he made the right choice. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Jackie Saulmon Ramirez

    As I go about my life I think about silly things like ‘will the mail be on time’ or ‘what should we have for supper today’ and then I read your posts and it really puts things into perspective. Mail and meals are suddenly not a big deal. THIS is a big deal. Thank you for these posts. ❤

    Like

  7. Thank you , GP , for the fine tribute to Uncle Joe . I have a copy of fellow pilot Armisted’s de-briefing paper . He describes the Buffalo vs. the attacking Japanese Zeros as if the Marine planes were hanging on threads at the mercy of the much more maneuverable enemy planes . By the way , I’ve always been proud to have been named after Joe . Another uncle’s B-17 was named “Captain Joe” later in the war . One of Uncle Joe’s sons , an Annapolis graduate , went into the Marine Corps just as the Vietnam War was heating up . He did two tours over there . By the way , Aunt Jeannette, Joe’s wife , never remarrried . They had three children . She had been known , always , as the prettiest girl in school .

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Wünsche eine gute Woche lieber Gruß Gislinde

    Like

  9. I often have trouble getting my head round numbers for anything quoted today (i.e. cars built in a day), but the numbers in your posts are truly shocking. The daily losses of men, ships, aircraft… whatever, are mind-numbing. When you think of the size of an aircraft carrier and then imagine losing 4 in quick succession, it seems astonishing that people went on fighting accepting such losses.

    Like

    • As in the game of chess, I suppose, some disassociate themselves and plan their moves after “acceptable” losses. It sure does seem difficult to comprehend though, doesn’t it?! Thanks for reading Hillary, how’s the book?

      Like

  10. GP, always enjoy reading your posts. The photos bring the stories alive. A lot of history happened when I was just a little girl. Christine

    Liked by 1 person

  11. The seaplane basin shown in your photograph of Midway appears to hold 14 Martin Mariners. They must have posed a potent anti-submarine force operating out of Midway as well as a valuable reconnaissance resource. There has been a copious amount of material published on the Battle of Midway, but do you know of any publications on our forces based on Midway and their threat to the Japanese?

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Very excellent article about Midway and Captain Hennessy. He sounds like quite a man and agree with Emily that we should never take our life for granted. Great Job, Everett!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Beautiful story GP.

    Like

  14. It’s amazing how many victories can be attributed to either luck or hutspa–that American ‘cowboy’ attitude where we don’t know we should give up.

    Like

    • Sort of like, the bumble-bee doesn’t know that it’s aerodynamically impossible to fly!! That cowboy attitude has helped us with a lot of things.

      Like

  15. Nice post, GP. First, what a stellar shot of the landing field in the snow. Midway was just what we needed, finally, to turn the war. Nice tribute.

    Like

  16. I’m glad that you brought Captain Hennessy’s gallantry to a wider audience of people, seventy years in the future, who still owe a great deal to him and to his colleagues.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I like that you included the bit about Capt. Hennessy. In the movie, and in some articles I’ve read, the Midway forces impact were minimized or made to seem futile. It’s important to realize that these were brave men and that their actions required the enemy’s attention. That alone made an impact on the battle’s outcome.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. I love the photos and tribute!

    Like

  19. I always find you photo’s of special interest. You must have or have access to a massive archive of WWII photo’s.
    I have a new blog, I don’t seem to be able to motivate myself to post to often, but you may like the few post I have made.
    Happy Spring Gardens

    Liked by 1 person

    • Some of the pix are from the books in my personal library, some from my father’s scrapbook and others usually come from AOL images that gives me access to most anyone with a pix associated with my topic.
      I’ll be happy to check out your new site.

      Like

    • Did I go into the right one? I couldn’t get into your Vietnam link.

      Like

  20. Pearl Harbor and 9/11 are reminders that we must be vigilant and never take our life and liberty for granted. It isn’t just about the individual but about we the people.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: