Lost on the “Montevideo Maru”

Other events transpired in June 1942 that were overshadowed by the victory at Midway. Lest We Forget.

hopemarg

Arthur Parker NX191449 (N108252) 1923-1942

Arthur “Toss” Parker was eighteen years and one month old on 4th April 1942 when he enlisted in WWII. He was too young to join the A.I.F., so he volunteered for the Anti Aircraft Anti Military Landing Craft Defence Force, Rabaul. After his compulsory training and pre-embarkation leave, he embarked on HMAT Neptuna on 7 August 1941 and disembarked Rabaul on 16 September 1941 along with two officers and fifty-two other comrades of his unit later known as A.A. Battery, Rabaul. These boys had been too young to be sent beyond the bounds of Australia with the regular army, but had been sent to the supposed safety of an Australian territory.
Once in Rabaul they took their gun position, with two 3-inch guns and obsolete ring-sight telescope, at Frisbee Ridge, silhouetted as it was against both north and southern skylines. For Rabaul lay in what was virtually a gigantic crater…

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on March 7, 2015, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 12 Comments.

  1. That is a piece of Australian history that is severely overlooked on our ANZAC day.
    The whole story needs to be made know, to all who appreciate our military history.
    The Montevideo Maru is a number of story’s in one,
    Would be interesting to know if the memorial was erected in Rabaul, it is now 4 years on.

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    • I agree, I reblogged this at once. I was originally going to save it for ANZAC Day, but couldn’t wait. People need to know that the war wasn’t just one big battle here and there. Action was everywhere and the support troops were busy behind the scenes. Thanks for reading, Ian, this post is right up your alley.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve read similar somewhere, to the effect that ‘plans never survive the first shots’ … another sobering post.

    I’m told that in an earlier age subs used to pop up, get everybody off, and then torpedo the abandoned ship.
    Then someone had the bright idea of sending well-armed ships to sea disguised as sitting ducks, and when the sub surfaced they’d sink the sub.
    So the subs learned to stay under, stay safe, and strike from ambush; no more ‘gentlemanly’ war at sea …

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  3. I have such great respect for those who risked their lives to protect their countries.

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  4. Guter Beitrag wünsche dir eine gute neue Woche lieber Gruß Gislinde

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  5. Great story. Amazing how plans never survive the roll out (who said that?)

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  6. I love these stories. Thanks for posting them.
    Will

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