Tribute and Doolittle Speech

Jack Manch - Doolittle Raider

Jack Manch – Doolittle Raider

Staunton, Virginia has been running a campaign to honor Jack Manch for being the hero that he was.  A low, black granite monolith in his honor to stand on a plot of ground donated by the city in Gypsy Hill Park.

001 (800x656)

 

 

In the Staunton “News Leader,” Baldwin Jennings,[ raising the memorial fund at 332 Sharon Lane] remarked:  “Standing 6’7”. Manch was far too tall to fly, so General “Hap” Arnold got him to bend his knee… A true American hero who deserves recognition for what he did.” [during the war and later in life].  Manch volunteered and joined the Doolittle Raiders and was one of the men who bailed out over China and worked his way back to friendly lines.

Jack Manch

Jack Manch

He returned to Staunton, and “Shorty” remained an aviator.  In 1958 he became the base inspector at Nellis Air Force base.  On the day of his death, Manch rode his troubled aircraft, making certain that a residential neighborhood was not below him.  He later bailed out, but he was no longer high enough.  His body was located in the desert near his plane.

R.I.P. Airman

R.I.P. Airman

article from the News Leader by Charles Culbertson; pictures courtesy of George Vass.  Jack Manch’s story was brought to my attention by Anne T. Bell, her blog can be located HERE!

Click on images to enlarge

************************

Doolittle wiring a Japanese medal to a 550-lb bomb to be used in the raid, this ceremony        was aboard the USS Hornet.

Doolittle wiring a Japanese medal to a 550-lb bomb to be used in the raid, this ceremony was aboard the USS Hornet.

During his speech 19 May at his Medal of Honor ceremony, General James H. Doolittle related:

“Along the coastline we observed several squadrons of destroyers and some cruisers and battleships.  About 25 miles to sea, the rear gunners reported seeing columns of smoke rising thousands of feet in the air.  One of our bombardiers strewed incendiary bombs along a quarter of a mile of aircraft factory near Nagoya.  Another illuminated a tank farm…

securedownload (6)

” However flying at such low altitudes made it difficult to observe the result following the impact of the bombs.  Even so, one of our party observed a ball game in progress.  The players and spectators did not start to run for cover until just as the field passed out of sight.  Pilots, bombardiers and all members of the crew performed their duties with great calmness and remarkable precision…

“We would like to have tarried and watched the later developments, but we were fortunate to receive a fairly detailed report from the excited Japanese radio broadcasts.  It took them [government officials] hours to calm them down to deception and accusation.”  Doolittle added that he gave detailed instructions that the Imperial Palace in Tokyo was not to be bombed.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This snippet is courtesy of “The Veterans of Foreign Wars Pictorial History of the Second World War.”

################################################################################

Military Humor – military-humor-funny-murphys-law-of-combat

It takes a looong time to make a G.I.

It takes a looong time to make a G.I.

###############################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

border

 

William Ball – Burke, VA; US Army, Lt.Col. (Ret.), West Point ’53, Vietnam, Bronze Star

Dennis Brenan – Anchorage, AK; US Army, Vietnamgodblessourtroops

Robert East – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Navy # 2261, WWII

Earl Knight – Yuma, AZ; US Army, WWII

Michael Heath – Jackson, MI; US Army, Vietnam

John HUmes – Toronto, CAN; British Army, King’s Own Scottish Borderers Inf Reg.

Carl Olson – Boise, ID; US Army, WWII, ETO

Willis Phillips Jr – Belleville, IL; US Air Force, Tech Sgt., Korea & Vietnam

John Runnion – Brandon, FL; US Army, Lt. Col. (Ret. 27 yrs), Vietnam, Bronze Star

Lewis Warren – Conway, AR; USMC, WWII, Korea

border

 WISHING EVERYONE A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!!

2kjslxfk78h

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 1, 2015, in First-hand Accounts, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 59 Comments.

  1. happy new year G! 🙂 ❤

    Like

  2. Thanks for these peeps into the past, each post is a story in its own right, combined they are like a film view of real people, real incidents, people whose contributions are remembered and acknowledged.
    Ian

    Like

  3. Thanks for one of the more interesting blogs around. Special thanks for Beetle Bailey. I loved BB as a kid and looked forward to the Sunday Milwaukee Journal where the strip was featured.

    Like

  4. Sharing these snippets help us capture, even if for a moment, the sacrifice made by ‘individuals’ and the impact those sacrifices had on the lives of themselves and their families.

    ‘He later bailed out, but he was no longer high enough. His body was located in the desert near his plane.’

    😦 Hard to read, but necessary to know, I feel.

    Like

    • Thank you for getting through to the end for outstanding gentleman, Miss Lou. I agree, these things need to mentioned and remembered; it is our history and heritage.

      Like

  5. Happy New Year! I do wish the monument effort becomes a success.

    Wonderful slide show! Of course, there is no way to substantiate what she said, but my grandmother told me once that “later in the war (remembering Japan was at war since 1937), she saw the biggest plane ever until then, then bam, bam!” a number of seconds later. She was in Tokyo and added she never heard such thunderous explosions before. I’d like to think she saw one of the Raiders… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is quite possible. Another eye witness story [in 2 parts] will be coming up Monday & then Thursday. It might spark a memory of something else she said about it. It’s good to hear these episodes from both sides. [you know that Smitty always told me to hear both sides to any story and sometimes there are even more sides!]

      Liked by 2 people

  6. G.P. – Wanted to stop in and wish you and yours a Happy and Healthy New Year. You are definitely one of the ‘good ones.’ Tom loves to share something special with each of his grandchildren at Christmas along with the usual items. This year he has been so very ill, he asked me if he thought it would be okay if the 13 and 14 yr old boys followed your blog and then they could discuss, etc. I thought it was a terrific idea. The grandsons are in N.C. but I have a 12 YRG I mentor and she wanted to be a part of the whole deal (and very bright) – and she loves Tom dearly.
    We just happened to give iPads to all 3 of them for Christmas so this should be a lot of fun with Skype now in the picture. I hope it will give Tom something to look forward to and therefore not be in so much pain. Thanks G.P. for all that you do and thank you for being my 2nd highest commenter for 2014. Gallivanta came in at 3rd place.

    Like

    • I am so thrilled that Tom is including everyone in a project that just might ease his pain. Hopefully the boys will find the blog a fun but learning experience while they connect to him on Skype. My heart breaks knowing that Tom is in such pain, but I don’t wish you to color the truth about his conditions either. It was very thoughtful of you to buy those IPads!
      I’m the second highest commenter? Well, no one can beat Ann [Gallivanta] – she is very loyal to my site too.
      Here’s hoping 2015 will be much, much better for you and Tom!!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. From reading that 6’7″ is too tall to fly back then. Is that for a fighter plane? That is an interesting to know that back then the plane design did not accommodate a tall person. I hope that is not true these days anymore.

    Happy New Year!

    Like

    • As far as I know – it is. For the U.S. Air Force, the requirements [as far as I know] 5’3″ to 6’4″ tall when standing; 34″ to 40″ tall when sitting and weigh between 160 and 230 [depending on the height]. Glad to see came by today. Happy New Year back atcha!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I hope the monument in Staunton is a success !

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Hoping 2015 will bring us closer to peace and further from war. Thanks for honoring those who served.

    Like

  10. Wonderful history, GP.

    Like

  11. Those men were true heroes, the word is loosely thrown at just about anybody these days, but the present crop cannot hold a candle to those very brave men, they virtually took on the unknown and triumphed. Real Heroes!

    Like

    • Taking on the unknown is is all too-true! The type of war, the equipment, terrain of the islands, and fighting an enemy who had their own sense of rules – just to name a few…I only hope our military of today is not caught off guard again. Thanks for stopping in and voicing your thoughts!

      Like

  12. I added some words to the Murphy’s Laws of combat G, but I couldn’t print them. 🙂 –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  13. What a great story, and sadly a life far too short. Thank you again for keeping us ever vigilant in knowing our service personnel, remembering their feats and sacrifices, and understanding the high price of freedom.

    Like

    • Well put, Sammy. I’m thrilled with the response this post has received – especially being a holiday of fun. I was worried people might not want to read war data. Thank you for taking the time.

      Like

  14. Another wonderful tribute, GP. Here’s to remembering the past, living the present, and looking forward to the future!

    Liked by 2 people

  15. gp, Now & then the iron of fate in the life of Jack Manch & the way he died after his great service & lining through the Tokyo Raid. My family takes great interest in all things Jimmy Doolittle……. My sister married a Doolittle cousin & the large Doolittle clan periodically has large family reunions. Nice job as always! Happy 2015 to you, gp!!!!

    Like

  16. Such courage to fly that low and then get out! Happy New Year, Everett!

    Like

  17. Paul H. Lemmen

    Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

    Like

  18. Happy New Year – I’m looking forward to learning even more here in 2015.

    Like

  19. Another excellent post. I really hope that “Shorty” gets the memorial he so richly deserves. What else could he have done for his country?

    Like

  20. Wünsche ein gutes 2015 alles liebe für dich Gruß Gislinde

    Liked by 1 person

  21. A very happy New Year to you and yours!

    Like

  22. I don’t know if I missed it, but how many men flew on the raid and how many made it home?

    Like

  23. I enjoyed listening to some of my father’s war stories this past Christmas. He mentioned that the ship he was on collected Marines from Noumea. He said they were very young very polite and well mannered and a pleasure to meet and talk to. He always feels sad when he mentions them. He thinks that many of the young ones he met were killed in a Pacific battle in 1944.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: