A World War II Blimp Hangar, a Guppy, and a Cow Escape Route… The Oregon Coast

HERE IS A VIEW, FROM CURT, OF HOME FRONT SUPPORT AS THIS CONSTRUCTION WENT INTO EFFECT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942. ‘WANDERING THROUGH TIME’ WILL HELP US TO REMEMBER.

Wandering through Time and Place

Eight blimps called this hangar in Tillamook, Oregon home during World War II. (Photo at Tillamook Air Museum.) Eight blimps called this Tillamook, Oregon hangar home during World War II. (Photo at Tillamook Air Museum.)

I’d been through Tillamook, Oregon several times and never spotted the huge blimp hangar that was built there during World War II. It is plainly visible from the Highway 101. Who knows what I was thinking about when I made my way up and down the road? It must have been a heck of a daydream. I saw the hangar this time, however, and it was like, “Wow!” I immediately changed plans and decided to stay in the area for another day. The hangar was something I had to visit.

How I missed seeing this building is a mystery to me. How I missed seeing this building is a mystery to me.

Today it serves as a partially abandoned air museum. (Most of its airplanes have been shipped off to Madras in eastern Oregon, where it’s hoped the vintage aircraft will survive better in…

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on December 6, 2014, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 32 Comments.

  1. Great post gp, well put together, great pics that tell the story behind this fascinating piece of military history.
    Enjoyed the Guppy and had a bit of a laugh at the Cow route, reminds me a little of the English comedy series called Dads Army.
    Regards
    Ian

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  2. Fascinating! I cannot believe the size of those blimps!

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  3. I taught middle school in an old converted army camp in White City, OR. The hanger was our gym. Great pictures!

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    • If I’m not mistaken, that city itself didn’t even exist before Camp White was built – am I correct? I’m glad to see I have another teacher watching me – let me know if you ever find a mistake – I try to allow no room for error.

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  4. There’s a blimp hanger on the east side of the freeway here in California–near Torrance I think. They still give blimp rides. Although, it’s been a few years since I checked.

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  5. It was fun sharing the story with GP, and through him, all of you who follow his blog. My thanks. –Curt

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  6. I used to live in Mountain View, CA and drove by Moffett Field twice each day. I always thought Hangar 1 was huge, but it looks like the Oregon structure has it beat.

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  7. Another great story! Amazing accounts of history!

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  8. gp, What an education this was re WWII blimps!!!!!!!!!! Had some idea but not to this magnitude! I commented on Curt’s website as follows……. Curt, gp cox sent me over from his website!!!! Many thanks for the education!!! So many of us have a dead spot in our WWII knowledge regarding blimps!!! I knew something of their contribution but nothing like the magnitude you teach us about here! My compliments! I appreciated you including specific size dimensions & comparisons, charts, comments on the men towing the anchor lines, etc. Just did a post on one of my Vietnam experiences on my website. Phil from excuseusforliving.com

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  9. Very interesting post! Didn’t realize how big they were and then saw the size of those massive doors. They are huge!!

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  10. When growing up near Galveston Texas there was a blimp hanger visible from the Interstate 45 It has been torn down but several of the building are still there (2000) Near Hitchcock Texas. On Galveston Island still several of the huge gun placements behind the sea wall. There was German submarine sunk just off the coast but now covered with the sand. I am sure most people along the gulf coast have no idea! jackie

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Very impressive images, and a great story.

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  12. What an interesting and great post. Thank you, GP Cox, for leading us to this Wandering through time!
    Best regards, Dina

    Liked by 1 person

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