Restoring the last surviving RAAF Consolidated B-24 Liberator

HERE’S SOME OUTSTANDING AVIATION INFORMATION FROM DEANO_____

Aces Flying High

B-24 Liberator Restoration Fund welcome sign Werribee Vic Australia B-24 Liberator Restoration Fund welcome sign

In Werribee a town in Victoria is a very unique piece of Australian military history.  The restoration of the lastremainingRoyal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Consolidated B-24 Liberator (and the only one in the southern hemisphere) is taking place there in an old air force hangar. The B-24 was a large (wingspan 33.5 metres/110 feet and length 20.7 metres/68 feet) 4 engined long-range heavy bomber with a 4 ton bomb load designed by the Consolidated  Aircraft Corporation of San Diego, California. It was used by the Allies in both the European and Pacific theatres of World War Two for bombing, maritime patrol and transport duties.

Werribee B-24 Liberator Restoration The Werribee B-24 Liberator

RAAF B-24 Liberator RAAF B-24 Liberator in WW2

The XB-24 prototype of the Liberator was ready for flight by the end of 1939 and proved a successful design. Redesignated the B-24, the aircraft was then put into mass-production

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on October 25, 2014, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 17 Comments.

  1. Thanks, I reblogged the original. Terrific story.

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  2. A bit before my time but I remember the pride I felt as a 12yo who built the Airfix model. I live within a hour of Werribee and will now keep informed on the reconstruction. A great read thanks.

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  3. Excellent post my friend, great coverage of this herculean restoration project.
    Very interesting reading all the way through, its hard to imagine the manpower and hours between 1940 and 1945, to turn out over 18,000 of these planes.
    I can only imagine a round the clock shiftwork being the only answer.
    Thanks for a great share.
    Ian

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  4. Great sense of history. Another reason to visit Australia.

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  5. A dear friend of mine Dick Rhodes who died quite some time ago was in the Ploesti Raid. Gunner in B-24. He lied about age to get into service and was 16 at the time.

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  1. Pingback: Restoring the last surviving RAAF Consolidated B-24 Liberator | dailyoddsandends

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