14 – 20 December 1941

Clarkfield, P.I., aftermath depicted in a Japanese print

Clarkfield, P.I., aftermath depicted in a Japanese print

Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox reported to the white House after his visit to Hawaii.  He did not accuse Admiral Kimmell or General Short of dereliction of duty and did point out that neither of the commanders were privy to the Magic intelligence intercepts.   Secretary of War, Henry Stimson was unaware of this interaction.  He had already sent a replacement to Pearl for General Short.  Pres. Roosevelt, displeased with Knox’s exoneration, called a meeting of high officials (including Knox).  A paper was given to each with the information they were permitted to mention at their press conferences.  It was to be admitted that the Army and Navy were unprepared and Kimmell and Short were to blame.  Knox’s own press release was verbatim of that paper. (Future posts will deal with the Kimmell and Short hearings as they fit into this history.).

Sec. of the Navy, Frank Knox

Sec. of the Navy, Frank Knox

Henry Stimson

Henry Stimson

 

15 December, to replace Admiral Kimmell, the White House discussions quickly agreed on RAdmiral Chester W. Nimitz, who was actually startled by the promotion.  He remarked to his wife, “… the fleet’s at the bottom of the sea.  Nobody must know that here, but I’ve got to tell you.”

16 December, the Japanese 19th Division landed on the northern coast of Borneo and pushed the British and Dutch troops into retreat.  A conquest of the Dutch East Indies would enable the enemy to dominate the southwestern sector of the Pacific and make an invasion of Australia possible.  Also on this date, the Allied airbase at Victoria Point in Burma fell into enemy hands.  This cut off aerial supplies to the local British forces.

Clarkfield days before attack

Clarkfield days before attack

19 December, a Japanese regiment from Palau took over Davao, a major port on Mindanao in the Philippine Islands.  It would serve as a staging point for the continued Dutch East Indies invasions and for further Philippine islands.  The British forces on Penang (off the coast of Malaya) were forced off that island.

The Japanese 38th Infantry Division of 40,000 men landed at Hong Kong.  They outnumbered the British garrison of 12,000 men.  The British were forced to withdraw behind the Perak River in central Malaya while the 11th Indian Division fought to delay the Japanese push.

Flying Tigers

Flying Tigers

20 December, over China, 10 Japanese bombers were shot down by US pilots of the Flying Tiger “volunteer” force.  This was the first engagement for the First American Volunteer Group based in Kunming.  The three fighter squadrons had been composed from the US Army Air Corps, Navy and Marines and commanded by Claire Lee Chennault.  Acting as a private military contractor group, they received 3-times the pay of the American military – plus bonus.  They would be replaced in July 1942 by the US Army 23rd Fighter Group.

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Humor – 

Despite today’s cutbacks – the military will continue to grow….

military pictures,military humor

181007-military_humor_10-4414

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What would your captions be?

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Farewell Salutes – 

Farewell...

Farewell…

Rocco Barone – Point Pleasant, NJ; US Army, WWII

Micharl “MJ” Duersten – Racine, WI & Tequesta, FL; US Army, Korea

Graham Greenwood – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 452668, WWII, Squadron Leader, SSgt. 2NZEF & AK179 Z Special Force

Earl Johnson – Ottawa, CAN; RC Navy, WWII

Howard Lord – Monticello, IN; US Army

Fred MacGregor JR. – Chatsworth Greene, VT; USMC, WWII, PTO / US Army, Korea, Captain

Obert Ouimette – WPalm Beach, FL; USMC, WWII

Donald Raybuck – Cabot, PA; US Army, MP, Vietnam

Roger Stanley – Saraland, AL; USMC, Vietnam

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on September 22, 2014, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 76 Comments.

  1. That first paragraph begs answers or leaves questions up in the air.
    Derelection of duty is a pretty big unsubstantiated accusation for a commander to carry.
    Great post gpcox.
    Emu

    Like

    • AND, they relieve him, but never get around to a trial – all left up in the air. Finally Kimmell can’t take it any longer and demands a trial. I am planning a 2 post pictorial and factual account of what happened when we get to that point.

      Like

  2. “woof woof” got it 2 clicks right… 🙂
    first pic, Cats worst nightmare..

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  3. my dad always had german shepherds and so that was my favorite of this post – thanks for the humor – and I do not have a caption for the cute squirrel shot – but the man and his dog… well the only thought that came to my mind was

    we hear a whispered “wait for it…” followed by a long pause and quiet sound of dog panting (note the tongue is out so you can feel the heat) – then again we here “wait for it…” and then they knocked over cans because this was just some training with man’s best friend. okay – cheesy – but you asked… ha! 🙂

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  4. Obedience. It is amazing how decent men can be made to ‘not tell the whole truth’ for the sake of the nation and thus land others in the sh1t. It is so frightening that it all happened so fast in so man areas at once.

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  5. AZVHV.wordpress.com

    Love the squirrel. “I will tolerate no competition for the bird feeder!” As for that awesome dog, a great Clint Eastwood quote fits well… “A good man always knows his limitations”.

    Like

  6. That German Shepherd took to using that sight to spot the Alpo truck at 300 yards.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. An interesting note on the ‘Flying Tigers’. In the UK there was a ‘volunteer’ sqn known as Eagle sqn comprising American airmen who gave their service to serve with the RAF before the states joined in. I wonder how many of these units existed across the different theatres of operation.

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  8. We have ground squirrels around our house that would give the Bazooka toting rodent a run for his money. 🙂 –Curt

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  9. So sad that they were used for scapegoats and feel for them and there family. Love the pictures but can’t think of any captions this morning. Great post!

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  10. I did not join the Air Force until 1957. I was stationed up in Presque Isle, Me with the 75th Fighter Interceptor Squadron. They were flying F89 Scorpions, still painted with the tiger mouth.

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  11. Love the humor section today!
    I read the book, “At Dawn We Slept” after that I think Kimmell and Short we assigned too much of the blame. They had their faults but other things went wrong at higher levels too.

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    • Oh, did they ever, Andrew!! When we get to their hearings, etc. I am planning a pictorial post or two to show that they were truly the scapegoats – only they do not get fully cleared until around 1999.

      Like

  12. I had a thought on the post and then got distracted by the dog photo. What a great find.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I feel a little disloyal by saying so, but the Japanese artwork is stunning!

    Like

  14. gp, Exceptional day by day accounts,,,,again history unfolding in ways we would otherwise never know! Good job as with all you posts! Phil

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Phil. You know this all started with me wanting to put my father’s scrapbook on-line, and then, I decided to follow him and his unit thru the war, and THEN, I was convinced to do the Korean War – well throughout all this research, reading a pile of books, etc. I became very frustrated that either the dates bounced around or were not mentioned for chapters on end. I wanted it all laid out for me as well as you!

      Like

  15. If you photoshop the guy out of 2nd pic, then humor caption –

    “there will be no boots on the ground”.

    Like

  16. Caption for the photo with the soldier and the dog… Comic bubble over the dog’s head saying, “Two clicks to the right, Kirby!”

    Like

  17. As always, there was something new to learn about a familiar moment in history. That’s what keeps me coming back to your posts, GP!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Great and interesting reading as always, GP Cox. We can’t stop marveling at all the facts you get together, let alone the precious photos. As Dan Antion says, it’s sad and interesting to see who gets the blame when things don’t work well. Thanks for this fine work!
    Best regards from the four of us, Dina

    Liked by 1 person

  19. It’s always interesting and sometimes sad to see who ends up with the blame when things go wrong. Mismatched results aren’t limited to the military or confined to history.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Thank you for relaying the non political events with the brass. Sadly, we have a need to place blame for every act that occurs. I hope that this helps the families of those men.

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  21. What would your caption be? I’ll borrow from Henry David Thoreau. “The squirrel that you kill in jest dies in earnest.”

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  22. Interesting to learn about the American Volunteer Force.

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  23. I can’t imagine how these commanders felt after being accused of dereliction of duty…
    Collateral damages I guess.

    Like

  24. “What would your captions be?” – “Maggie’s drawers mate, have another go”

    Liked by 1 person

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