First-hand Account

Major Doody, (Ret.)

Major Doody, (Ret.)

Major Kathryn Mary Doody

Kathryn Doody was enrolled in nursing school by her mother, but following her graduation, the United States Army would not accept her until they lowered their height requirements.  Kathryn was at the Tripler Army Hospital, Hawaii on 7 December 1941 as one of eighty-two nurses.

Kathryn Doody, RN

Kathryn Doody, RN

Her baptism of fire came that fateful morning when the sound of bombs woke her.  She ran into the yard and saw aircraft smoke.  Thinking that an accident occurred, she went to see the night nurse on duty, only to be informed otherwise – Oahu was under attack.  Finding the news a bit unbelievable, Kathryn turned on a radio and listened to the broadcast herself – now she believed.  “I hadn’t been there long [Hawaii] before the bombs descended.”

Hawaii

Hawaii

She was summoned to the operating room to begin treating those coming in injured from Hickam Field.  As she worked with her patients and preparing for new arrivals, she heard the sound of bullets hitting the pavement outside, but neither she nor the hospital were hit.  She began to wonder what life would be like in wartime as she assisted in her first major limb amputation.  She continued to work until midnight with troops standing guard outside the doors.

The horror of the attack continued the following morning when Kathryn checked on her patients.  Some of the wounded had accidentally ripped out their tourniquets during the night and some had bled to death.

Later, Kathryn was given a leave and then assigned to Germany where she was awarded a Bronze Star.  During the Korean War, she was part of the original 8063rd Mobile Army Surgical Hospital – the first MASH unit in Korea.  Kathryn Doody retired as a Major in the US Army and passed away 3 October 2010 in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

HQ tent of the 8063rd MASH, Korea

HQ tent of the 8063rd MASH, Korea

This story was composed from information found at the Veteran’s History Project – Library of Congress.

Click on images to enlarge.

##############################################################################################

Humor – 

DIARY OF A NURSE

I dreamed I’d see the country,
If I ever had the luck;
But in my wildest fancies,
It was never made by truck.
 
Nurse Nightingale before us,
Carried candles through the mist;
The modern maid of Mercy,
Totes a helmet in her fist.
 
Nostalgic waves encompass me
Though I’m still patriotic;
Tonight, my dear, I long to see
A land that ain’t exotic!
 
_____Lt. Rose C. Craig;
Puptent Poets, Stars and Stripes
 

##############################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Richard Attenborough (Lord) – London, England; RAF Film Unit, WWII, ( famed actor, producer, director)

Boyce Bates – Springfield, OR; US Air Force, Airman First Class, Korea

courtesy: Cora @ A Fresh Start

courtesy: Cora @ A Fresh Start

Reginald Broadfoot – Waihi, NZ; RNZ Army, WWII # 622619, tank battery

Henry Doering – Regina, CAN; RC Army, WWII

Lloyd Dumond – Fort Kent, ME; US Army, WWII

Kenneth Jones – Liverpool, AU; 2 AIF, Major, Korea & Vietnam

Jeremiah LeFlore – Durant, OK; US Army, Vietnam

Lyman Oliver – Burlington, KY; US Coast Guard, Chief Warrant Officer (Ret. 20 years)

Teddy Patton – Lady Lake, FL; US Army, WWII & Korea, LtColonel (Ret.)

##############################################################################################

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on August 25, 2014, in First-hand Accounts, Korean War, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 53 Comments.

  1. A very devoted nurse and patriotic lady.
    Her first baptism of fire would have been horrific
    Yet her duties continued.
    Ian

    Like

    • Didn’t you find keeping busy got you through the roughest of times? It’s the ONLY way I have gotten through A LOT!! This was one heck of a story in my opinion and I’m very happy you thought so too, Ian – Thanks!!

      Like

  2. I would appreciate if you add to your farewell salute my friend: Harvey A. Chesley, Sr. Clinton, Maine, U. S. Marines, Viet Nam

    Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:09:29 +0000 To: david_record@hotmail.com

    Like

    • I’ll be happy to. I just put in a new post, so I’ll zip back in there and and update the Farewell Salute. I am very sorry for the loss of your friend.

      Like

  3. Inspirational woman, I wonder if she had a family?

    Like

  4. Wonderful report, gpcox. You filled in some blanks for me. While the nurses were always there, they were in the shadows of the horror… Yet, they saw all of it and war’s repercussions. My face turns cold for an instant when you realize they were trying to save the lives of teenagers. I’m going to forward this to Rick Doody, my good friend. His mom was a Rosie but who knows!

    Like

  5. Hard to imagine what being a nurse under those conditions must have been like. I appreciate you sharing her story.

    Like

  6. How dedicated were the brave men and woman like Kathryn who fought against the call of giving up and won, we give thanks to God for them, and thank you for sharing gpcox their uplifting life stories during the years of war in which they served.

    Christian Love from both of us – Anne

    Like

  7. Fantastic post! What an amazing woman. I like the direction you are taking your blog, well done!

    Like

  8. What a lovely little old lady – the things those eyes must have seen!

    Like

  9. There must be so many like her in the Mash units that we never hear of, who spent chunks of their youth far from home doing a humanitarian job. Great to hear about her. The poem is wonderful, with that great army sense of humour.

    Like

    • Thanks, Hillary. I really didn’t think the cartoons I saw about nurses really applied, that’s why I went with the poem – glad you liked it.
      PS. I’m having difficulty finding any further data on Line 27, but I’m still into it.

      Like

  10. What a lady! Am wondering how tall Kathryn was. 🙂

    Like

  11. Nurses are often unsung heros! Thanks for sharing these stories!

    Like

    • I’d like to see more of these wonderful people honored on-line for future generations to learn about – kids wouldn’t need to go looking for heroes and idols.

      Like

  12. Amazing events in everyday lives. War does that.

    Like

  13. What a tough soldier she was to be dealing with the wounded in such nightmarish situations – a brave woman.

    Like

  14. An amazing woman, thank you for sharing her story.

    Like

  15. “…until they lowered their height requirements”… I couldn’t hold my tears reading this line. Brave little heart!

    Like

  16. Very interesting–I want to hear more! Is there an autobiography/bio out there of her?

    Like

  17. A great tribute to such a hero!

    Like

  18. We’re rarely presented wartime action from the nurses’ point of view. They’ve long been an integral part of war, but historians don’t quote them often enough.

    Like

  19. As a woman and a Nurse Practitioner, I so appreciate this post! To think she served in both WWII and Korea! Wow … what a woman / what a nurse / what a hero!
    Thank you!

    Like

  20. Wonderful to have a nurse’s story and point of view; that point of view also well-expressed in the poem.

    Like

  21. So many of these stories illustrate the strong desire to serve, How much easier it would have been to work as a nurse in the States.

    Like

  22. Paul H. Lemmen

    Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

    Like

  23. Pierre Lagacé

    So many terrible war memories she carried with her all her life.

    Like

  24. Often unsung heroes..

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: