7 December 1941 (2)

 
Pearl Harbor view from a Japanese fighter

Pearl Harbor view from a Japanese fighter

0749 hours – “ToToToToTo” went out to all Japanese pilots (the first 2 letters of ‘Totsugeki!’  CHARGE!), and the torpedo bombers proceeded to sweep Battleship Row.  “Tora! Tora! Tora!” was sent out next.  The code, Tiger! Tiger! Tiger! was sent 5000 miles to the “Akagi” for Admiral Yamamoto to be aware that the Strike Force had indeed caught the US Navy by surprise; the Admiral read the message and then continued his game of Shogi with his staff gunnery officer, Watanabe.
Three civilian planes safely landed back on Oahu after being caught in the maelstrom of tracer bullets.
Shanghai Harbor under attack

Shanghai Harbor under attack

1000 hours – In Shanghai, China, Lt Comdr. Columbus Smith was woken up by a call from the HMS “Wake” to make a report on the attack of Pearl Harbor.  He immediately rushed to scuttle his command, but was promptly arrested by Japanese guards.
1130 hours – over Singapore, the 5am streetlights directed the Japanese planes to the city.  The Changi Naval Base, and British ships, “Prince of Wales” and “Repulse” returned antiaircraft fire.
 
USS Cassin & Downs

USS Cassin & Downs

 

On Formosa, the Japanese planes of the 11th Air Fleet were grounded by fog and were unable make their scheduled attack on Luzon.
1257 hours –  Guam was bombed by the Japanese navy bombers from Saipan.  The Marine barracks were destroyed and the USS “Penguin” was sunk.
 
USS Penquin

USS Penquin

 

 
1300 hours –  36 Japanese bombers left Roi in the Marshall Islands and strafed Wake Island.  Lacking radar, the fighter planes recently delivered by the “Enterprise” had only 15 seconds warning; 7 of them were destroyed on the ground.  Twelve Marines and 6 civilians of the Pan Am Hotel were killed.  A Marine survivor said, “The pilots in every one of those planes was grinning wildly.  Every one wiggled his wings to signify Banzai.”
The Pan Am flying boat, “Philippine Clipper”, escaped with 23 bullet holes in her as she carried 70 airline personnel and the             wounded from the island.  Pilot Capt. Hamilton radioed back that an enemy cruiser with destroyers was headed toward Wake.
 
Ford Island Air Station & USS Shaw

Ford Island Air Station & USS Shaw

1400 hours –  Hong Kong was attacked by 35 enemy bombers.  MGen. C.M. Maltby knew Britain would not defend the possession, but he was ordered to “hold out as long as possible.”
1500 hours –  With the fog lifted on Formosa, Luzon was attacked by 32 Japanese Army bombers and 192 of their Navy’s 11th Air Fleet took off to follow through.
Clark Field, Nov. 1941

Clark Field, Nov. 1941

1730 hours – a radar operator at Iba Field, Luzon spotted the Japanese squadron approaching and transmitted the data to Clark Field, but the teletype operator was literally out to lunch.  In a series of mistakes,  MacArthur had erred in underrating his enemy.
2200 hours –  Counterattacks at Kota Bharu failed.  This prompted the Australian commander to request permission to evacuate his remaining planes 150 miles south.  Ground personnel and civilians left the town as the surviving Indian troops stayed to make a final stand.
 
Cynthia Olson SS

Cynthia Olson SS

 
Also on this date, but the hour unknown, the US cargo ship “Cynthia Olson” loaded with lumber for Hawaii was torpedoed by the enemy submarine I-26 and sunk in the Pacific, 1200 miles west of Seattle, with the loss of 35 men.  
 

On that first night, as the world turned into another day, a darkness, never before known, fell over the Pacific culminating 24 hours of unmitigated disaster.  Only the British Prime Minister went to bed content, “So, we have won after all.  Being saturated and satiated with emotion and sensation, I went to bed and slept the sleep of the sound and thankful”_____Winston Churchill

Click on any image to enlarge.

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Political Cartoons of the times_________

 

 U_S_-declares-war-3Winds-of-War-8-Oct-41 (697x800)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Personal Note……  

It has been a while since I’ve given the veterans and volunteers of Little Rock, Arkansas a renewed Shout Out!!  I sincerely hope you are all enjoying this web site – this includes you too, Tom DeGrom!  I have spies out there and I want to hear that you are all doing well!  
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Farewell Salutes – 

Harry Alsman Sr. – LeClaire, IA; US Navy, Korea

Richard Bolt – Wellington, NZ; RNZ Air Force, Air Marshal, Chief of Defense Staff (Ret.)

James Chase – Chatman, MA; US Army, HQ Company, 11th A/B (Ret. 20 years)

Robert DePledge – Invermere, BC, Can; RC Armywwii-memorial-011me

Everett (Pat) Emmick – Loxahatchee, FL; US Army, Vietnam, Bronze Star

Eugene Knobbe – Boynton Beach, FL; US Army, Korea

Andrew Manchester Sr. – No. Branford, CT; US Army Air Corps. WWII, B-17 top turret gunner, 15th & 8th Army, ETO, No. Africa

Leonard Pilarski – Nesconset, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, F Co/511th Reg.

Charles Roberts, Jr. – Kansas City, MO; USMC, BrigGeneral, Korea & Vietnam, Purple Heart

Harry Stamos – Hendersonville, NC; US Army, WWII, Signal Corps, ETO

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THANK YOU FOR THE CORRECTION, ALLEN.

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on August 11, 2014, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 64 Comments.

  1. A well planned and formidable attack
    Hard to imagine that the US militarys intelligence had no report of impending attack.
    Emu

    Like

  2. Someone who lived in Hawaii told me that many people (who lived farther away) saw the smoke rising from Pearl Harbor and thought the Navy was running some sort of military drill. Didn’t realize until later that the island had been attacked.

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    • You are quite right, Mary. At first many of the reports start out that way. Obviously, the Army and Navy bases had their training sessions and people became accustom to hearing and seeing war-like activity. Thank you for stopping by.

      Like

  3. Too meticulously orchestrated by the Japanese to have been missed completely by either Great Britian’s or our own intelligence operations. So sad.

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  4. Such an informative post. Like you, the more I read and learn, the more I think our govt knew more. And some things never change. You’re doing a wonderful job and a service!

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    • Thank you, Linda. It means a lot to me that you approve. I repeatedly have to edit myself to keep my own feelings out of the posts, but then become afraid that they sound too dry or stoic.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. My father still speaks of that fateful day. He remembers it vividly. He was only a boy of six years old. Thank you so much for this.

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  6. History through your eyes ……….. very memorable one
    with regards

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  7. Reblogged this on aksharaalu – Best Collections and commented:
    History through your eyes ……….. very memorable one

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  8. You really captured the frenetic nature of that first day.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. fab post.
    I love old fotos.

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  10. Hey there, found your blog through a friend and decided to give you a follow. Come join the fun over at http://www.thatssojacob.wordpress.com 🙂 have a great day!

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  11. What amazing pictures! I didn’t realize how many places the Japanese attacked and never even heard of the USS Penguin or the Cynthia Olson. I feel like I slept through history class the week we covered WW2. Guess I need to do some reading! “A nation that forgets its past is doomed to repeat it.” – Winston Churchill Another great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I doubt you were sleeping in class. If your school was like mine, you were handed a number of names and dates and told to memorize them. And even in that short-hand way of teaching – everything could not be covered. I shutter to think just how much I have missed as well. So read, read and then read some more, we should never stop learning.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. And to think, all of this could have been prevented. There will always be war, I fear.

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  13. What a perspective–the pictures. I’ve never seen those. They must have thought they hit the jackpot–complete surprise. Sigh.

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    • More and more becomes declassified from the Archives – when allowed or when the understaffed departments get around to them. Glad you liked it, Jacqui.

      Like

  14. Reblogged this on The ObamaCrat™.

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  15. Pierre Lagacé

    I like the term mainstream historians here on this Wikipedia article…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearl_Harbor_advance-knowledge_conspiracy_theory

    I won’t comment more about mainstream historians…

    The Pearl Harbor advance-knowledge conspiracy theory is the idea that American officials had advance knowledge of Japan’s December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Ever since the Japanese attack there has been debate as to how and why the United States had been caught off guard and how much and when American officials knew of Japanese plans for an attack.[1][2]

    Several writers, including journalist Robert Stinnett[3] and retired US Navy Rear Admiral Robert A. Theobald,[4] have argued that various parties high in the U.S. and British governments knew of the attack in advance and may even have let it happen or encouraged it in order to force America into war via the “back door.”[5][6] Evidence supporting this view is taken from quotations and source documents from the time[7] and the release of newer materials. However, the Pearl Harbor advance-knowledge conspiracy theory is rejected by most mainstream historians.[8][9][10]

    Like

    • No one in their right minds wants to believe that their government wanted to be attacked and allowed their men to die simply for the support of declaring war. But, I’m afraid the more I read, the more I tend to be persuaded that they did. Remember Stimson, under Hoover kept trying to get the president to feel anti-Japanese; when that didn’t work – he started on the League of Nations by putting McCloy (a friend of his) as the US representative. This plan worked so well that Japan withdrew from the League. We had the radar and the intercepts (which were kept from Kimmell and Short in Hawaii) and the reports from the Dutch about where the enemy fleet was – disregarded. The investigation committee was filled with men hand-picked by Stimson. Just a small sample, but as you said, this has been debated for over 70 years. I suppose looking back with 2014 eyes – we will all see things differently.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have made my own opinion about all this.
        I share yours.

        This was just a big chess game like what your other reader wrote.

        The game is still going on.
        It will forever I am afraid.

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        • Either some people refuse to see, or as in the the cases of Gen. Short and Adm. Kimmell – they were ordered not to see it. (There will be at least one post on their situations also.) But, everyone is entitled to voice their opinions – that’s what we’re supposed to be fighting for.

          Liked by 1 person

      • We should have a discussion over coffee one morning! 🙂 I won’t comment here on the “revisionist” theories as I have written about it… But I strongly believe MacArthur should have been courts-martialed after his carefree attitude which truly left his soldiers with their pants down. Instead, he was heralded.

        Have you seen the recently “rediscovered” lost footage of Pearl?

        Loved the other details you provided. I definitely was unaware of the Olson. And my eyes are so bad, I couldn’t make out the illustrator of the last cartoon. I do feel the embargoes left the military leaders of Japan (especially their powerful Army socially) left no alternative. War was inevitable.

        Regardless, many lives were lost… and many more were to come.

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        • You are not alone in your thoughts about MacArthur, it was brought up. He had been retired since 1935 and he was a lot older than most – BUT – FDR knew how well loved he was by the American public that he did not want to take a chance on losing all that Pearl Harbor support he just got. Short and Kimmell were the chosen scapegoats and I am planning 2 posts (most right out of a Toland book) in pictures about them. No, I have not seen the rediscovered footage – is it on TV? What channel? The best I can see on the cartoon, the signature reads, Cal Alley – any help?

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  16. Very interesting…Most often we only hear what occurred at Pearl Harbor and not the “rest of the story” – Thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    • I thought it only right, Chris, and you are very welcome. The people of other Pacific nations were much closer to Japan and were to have the fear of capture throughout the war, whereas the US (as far as Japan was concerned) was attacked to keep us away – they had no intentions of invading.

      Liked by 2 people

  17. “Couldn’t see it” “wouldn’t see it” we can only guess. I am amazed by how many other attacks took place that we never learned about. Continuing thanks for your effort here and the good job you have done.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Sacrifice a few pawns to position a rook, sacrifice a rook to position a queen …

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Paul H. Lemmen

    Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

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  20. Pierre Lagacé

    Reblogged this on Lest We Forget and commented:
    December 7th, 1941… Part 2

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  21. Thank you for what you do. I would love to see your posts on the first page of every daily paper.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Aren’t you sweet – I think the secret to my success is that even though there are many other, more professional looking web sites out there – this isn’t a job for me, I don’t make a cent off it and it truly means something to me.

      Liked by 2 people

  22. What a disaster! A friend and I have just been listening to King George’s speech from Sept 3rd 1939 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAhFW_auT20 . We hope that we will never have to be party to anything like this in our life time. Glad to see you have Richard Bolt in the farewell salutes.

    Like

  23. A great summary and after your previous two posts the warning signals it was all the more amazing how the Japanese made such spectacular ‘surprise’ attacks. Churchill’s quote is very telling.

    Like

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