Posted in 2009 – D-Day revisited… June 6, 2014

Another interesting post for the men who fought for us!!

Lest We Forget

Still something to ponder about when you see some people laying wreath on this day of rememberance…

Original post

I stumbled on this last month

It was an article on a blog.

June 6, 2009

June 6: A walk across a beach in Normandy

normandy.jpg

Today your job is straightforward. First you must load 40 to 50 pounds on your back. Then you need to climb down a net of rope that is banging on the steel side of a ship and jump into a steel rectangle bobbing on the surface of the ocean below you. Others are already inside the steel boat shouting and urging you to hurry up.

Once in the boat you stand with dozens of others as the boat is driven towards distant beaches and cliffs through a hot hailstorm of bullets and explosions. Boats moving nearby are, from time to time, hit with a high…

View original post 636 more words

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on June 7, 2014, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 37 Comments.

  1. That is one very powerful and poignant writing.
    No amount of words by all governments will ever portray
    the sentiments of those who lie in hallowed grounds.
    Only those who paid the price are qualified to speak the truth.
    Emu aka Ian

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  2. I think it is awesome that people share their stories and history with others.

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    • Some are finally opening up as they see the flights going to Washington and Normandy and yet so many stories have been lost. Thank you for reading this one, Toni.

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  3. What an excellent post…thank you for sharing it.

    There are a few politicians, bureaucrats, etc., who know the perils of war, and who have contributed greatly. But, there are also those who use events and memorials for their own gain.

    “Princes and bureaucrats, be silent. Be gone. We are now and forever one with the sea and the sky and the wind and the steel rain. We march on.”

    Those four sentences are extremely telling…

    _Lorri

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  4. I don’t know about all the politicians etc who talk or attend D-Day commemorations, but there are a few dignitaries who have a special place at the ceremonies eg Queen Elizabeth and her husband were both in service during the Second World War; the British and Commonwealth Veterans would have felt enormously honoured by their presence.

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    • I’m sure they would be. (When I group the politicians together, I’m not even thinking about royalty, they did their part)

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      • I didn’t see all the ceremonies but there did seem to be some unfortunate grandstanding by politicians. Nine veterans were in the official NZ delegation. This is what is was all about for them
        “We’re here to remember the boys, the young boys who died here. We have a responsibility to represent these people,” Harton said. “After all these years, it is so vivid.”
        http://www.nzherald.co.nz/war/news/article.cfm?c_id=359&objectid=11269574

        A day before the New Zealand delegation was due to attend the official commemorations at Sword Beach, the group paid tribute at the graves of eight Kiwis buried at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery in Bayeux, where more than 4100 Allied soldiers are buried.

        Some in the group said they would be haunted by thoughts of a New Zealand seaman, Dennis Nunn, who died aged just 19 after Allied forces broke out from the beachheads and the campaign became the Battle of Normandy.

        “It was the grave of this boy that brought it all into focus for me, buried on his own, a long way from home,” said Harton.

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  5. A brilliant encapsulation of the bravery and the futility of war, and a finger placed firmly on this strange proclivity of the human tribe, which is at once its inspiration and its fatal flaw. Whatever can we do to temper the lust for power so we might avoid destroying ourselves?

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    • If anyone really had the answer to that Fredrick, the world wouldn’t be in all these little wars everywhere. The peace people pray for each night is not always an example of their behavior during the day – it has been said it is human nature and will never stop.

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  6. What a great way to tell that story. ‘Today your job is straightforward’.

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  7. Great post, great posts. We owe those men so much.

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    • Yes, and we will have many more posts. The post I had planned as the final Intermission Story is still being researched, therefore I will be having more of the first-hand stories until that research is finished. People seem to be enjoying the Intermission, so it shouldn’t be too bad. Thank you for coming by today, Don.

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  8. gp, A remarkable 70th D-Day Anniversary with worthy tributes in the media….yours at the top of meaningful stories with Lest We Forget from June 6, 2009. Good post! Phil

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  9. The message on Pierre’s site is very moving and appropriate – our governments seem to like military pomp and circumstance but ignore the needs of veterans.

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  10. Hell, we’ll never see words and emotions like this out of Obama… Rice… Clinton(s)… They are a disgrace to these honorable words. Wonderful reblog, gpcox. Thanks, Pierre!

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  11. A letter my father wrote to his parents from New Guinea after hearing of the opening of the ‘second front’. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10153103459884237&substory_index=0&id=565399236

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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    • Do you have a web site with these letters?

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      • Not yet. I don’t know how to set up a website. I have letters from the time he took his physical in 1942 through the final letter and telegram that he was coming home 3 years and 8 months later. Joan

        Sent from my iPhone

        >

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        • It would be s shame if you didn’t. If you click on WordPress.com they walk you thru it all, very easy, free and a very secure site. (in fact they have never had a security leak, whereas facebook has had 3 major ones.)
          Give it a shot, you have total control over your site and can even take it down completely if you’re not happy – but remember it takes about one week for Google or Yahoo to pick you up.

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          • gpcox,
            I have now gotten a new blog address writeallthenews.com.
            My user name is still Joanmcnurse. I will begin to gradually publish my father’s letter from beginning to end. I have a new header picture which shows pictures my grandparents had made with my father and my uncle prior to their enlistment in the US Army and US Navy. Thankfully both returned home uninjured. I appreciate your encouragement.

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            • No problem, Joan. My main goal is to have all the stories, as many as possible anyway, put someplace where future generations can learn from them and the men remembered.

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  12. This is a link to a post on Facebook that is the letter my father wrote to his parents on 6/7/1944 after hearing of the opening of the ‘second front’. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10153103459884237&substory_index=0&id=565399236

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  1. Pingback: Posted in 2009 – D-Day revisited… June 6, 2014 | Old Bones Genealogy of New England

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