Korean War Statistics

Moving the wounded

Moving the wounded

Personal note – The resources I have used throughout this Korean War project all vary in the total statistics; therefore I have been forced to give the readers the range [highest and lowest] or the only amount located.

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All the news fit to print, brings smiles

All the news fit to print, brings smiles

United States – of the 1,319,000 men that served –  33,629 to 54,246 were KIA – – 92,134 to 103,284 were WIA

Republic of Korea – 58,127 to 59,000 were KIA – – 175,743 were WIA and ~ 80,000 MIA

Great Britain – 1,109 were KIA – – 2,674 to 4,817 were WIA and 1,060 MIA

Canada – Of 25,000 who served – 516 were KIA and 1,042 were WIA

Australia –  Of 17,000 served – 281 to 339 were KIA and 1, 050 were WIA

New Zealand – Of 3,794 who served – 33 were KIA – – 79 were WIA

Turkey – 717 to ~900 KIA – – 2,111 to 3,500 WIA and 168 MIA

South Africa – Of the 826 served – 28 were KIA    – – 8 were MIA

Netherlands – 110 KIA

France – 300 were KIA  or MIA

Philippines – 112 were KIA

Greece – 170 were KIA

Belgium – 100 were KIA

Thailand – 110 were KIA

Ethiopia – 120 KIA

Columbia – 140 were KIA

001 (582x800)

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The border road today

The border road today

From Western resources – North Korea had 215,000 men KIA and 303,000 listed as WIA.  Chinese troops were down as 400,000 as KIA and 486,000 as WIA.

From Chinese resources – North Korea suffered 290,000 KIA and China listed themselves as – 144,000 KIA – 340,000 WIA  – 7,600 as MIA

Civilian casualties in both North and South Korea could only be estimated and those numbers ran from 400,000 to well into the millions.

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India had chosen not to participate in the fighting, but they did send the 60th Parachute Field Ambulance unit which was included in the 1st Commonwealth Division.  The Indian Paratroop Battalion/315 Air Division were deployed later as part of the Custodial Forces sent to enforce the demilitarized zone.

374th's Douglas C-124 Globemaster in Korea

374th’s Douglas C-124 Globemaster in Korea

The US Air Force 374th Troop Carrier Wing, throughout the war, performed air lifts and air drops; after the cease-fire, using the C-124 Globemaster, they moved the repatriated prisoners.  By the end of the war, they had earned their 4th DUC.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – Soldiers_saluting_siloutte1

Samuel Applewhite III – Oakland, CA & Scottsdale, AZ; US Army, Korea

Vincente Blaz – Fairfax, VA; USMC (Ret.)

Donald Boyd – Boone, Iowa & Sun City, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Lawrence Hammar- Kerkeley, IL; US Army, WWII, PTO

Patrick A. Lindsay – born: Tipton, England, died: Village Point-Claire, Quebec; Royal Navy, WWII, HMS Brocklesby

Allan A.C. Riordan – Christchurch, NZ; RNZAF # 72855, WWII, Malaysia

Cyril Shaller – EauClaire, WI; US Navy, WWII

Albert Taylor (Burt) Taylor – Christchurch, NZ; NZEF # 290465

Joseph Vito – Chicago, IL; US Navy, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on March 10, 2014, in Korean War, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 71 Comments.

  1. Is this the main Korean War page? Well I have been looking at many to your Korean War posts and your project looks well done G!
    I also wanted to share a link for the page with the Korean War vet Robert Moss (the one I met last week and did a min interview) – I will post about later this month – but here is the page with the photo until I can get to the post;

    https://inthezone2001.wordpress.com/rva/

    And when I see Mr Moss again – I will give him your blog link- or show him right there on my pad or phone! And we will see what he thinks of the Korean War pages – 😉
    Xxoo

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Korea’s flexing its muscles firing missiles. That guy is nutz and dangerous.

    Like

  3. Greetings my friend, I had to check a few statistics, not to question your post, but just to get some idea of the overall commitment by Australia, 77,000 Aussies served and 339 Kia, that appears to be, with no disrespect, a small portion overall,I find 1216 Wia and captured 30.
    The Kia figure seems small, but then I am comparing it to Vietnam figures.
    Wonder what the outcome was of the 30 captured Aussies.
    Great post.
    Ian

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This gentleman might pop up on your next farewell salute: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/9824147/Decorated-navy-veteran-dies

    One of my goals for the rest of the month is to get caught up on your Korea series. I’ve been horribly behind on my reading!

    Liked by 1 person

    • After reading “Cyclone”s story, I’ve decided to add it to one of the posts; I hope others watch the video and read his tale. I’ll be adding a link to your site as the contributor, so you might want to expect a few visitors. I was just into the N.Z. Herald 2 days ago, so I missed this – thanks for your contribution – that’s what I’ve been talking about – team work!!

      Like

  5. Thank you so much for taking so much of your time to report on this war, though it probably wasn’t your original intention, I do appreciate it. I have learned so much because of your efforts.

    Like

  6. Thanks so much for the series, Gp. And for all of the work obviously put into it. –Curt

    Like

  7. “Turkey – 717 to ~900 KIA – – 2,111 to 3,500 WIA and 168 MIA”

    This is interesting as I assumed that Turkey lost a lot more KIA as quite often they reportedly fought to the last man. Must be my memory playing games.

    Whichever way we view it – needless loss of lives.

    Damn the commies!

    Pity the families.

    Like

    • The Turkish troops were tough and did often refuse to back down – like you said they charged and continued fighting. A brave bunch to go in like that. I agree, Eric, the poor families.

      Like

  8. Part of the mind set that we had to stop the communist at all cost. Amazing that our friend in World War Two? became the enemy. And the enemy Japan became our friend.

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  9. 33,629 to 54,246 were KIA – for US why such a disparity and lack of accuracy?

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  10. GP, I appreciate you efforts. I learned much, that I didn’t know before. Especially, about futility, political interference, incompetence, and the list goes on. FYI, here’s the name of another Korean War Vet–86 year old Carroll Jordan, from Chickasaw, AL (near Mobile) died in January ’14 after his home was broken into by thieves and he was badly beaten. There’s more about this tragedy on the WKRG TV website.

    Like

    • Thank you for your support and interaction during this series, Adam. I hope you continue to enjoy the Intermission Stories and return to WWII as well. I’ll look into That Mr. Jordon story.

      Like

  11. Very sobering information. It saddens me very much. Thank you for this series on the Korean war. I learned a lot as I am sure many others did. I appreciate your hard work.

    Like

  12. When I finally mustered the courage to actually visit the Wall, there were names. It is so sad and humbling to realize these men appear nameless… if not for good people like you, gpcox. Thank you so much…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Seeing the names like that would making quite a blow; one minute they were numbers in a book and the next – you’re faced with the fact that they were real, flesh and blood men. I thank you for understanding what drives me; your loyalty to this site has been an inspiration.

      Like

  13. I think a lot of people are visual so we get more out of a graph or a listing in one place like this post. Seeing these statistics as well as seeing the memorial in DC forms an upsetting visual picture but one that is necessary to learn from. Thanks for a great series on the Korean War.

    Like

  14. Thank you again for a great Korea series . Such tragic casualty numbers , and still we go on to the next war , and the next war ………. We humans have advanced in technology , including how to kill one another more efficiently , but not so much in getting along in this world with one another .( I almost wrote ” but not so much in humanity” , but maybe conflict is part of humanity .)
    I am looking forward to future posts .

    Like

  15. I tried not to read this post because I knew it would be depressing. And it was. Is. Good grief. I don’t know how we would have prevented this, though.

    Like

  16. Sobering to contemplate . . . and a little odd that military organizations would not know the exact numbers. Although, it might be how they classify personnel. Perhaps the numbers are all there, but in different listings.

    Like

  17. It is genuinely sad that so many lives are reduced to un-agreed upon statistics, isn’t it?

    Like

  18. Whichever way you look at it, the losses are highly disturbing.

    Like

  19. Perfect work, as always. One day perhaps, may we see your sweet face??

    Like

  20. You do us all a favor in the education of us in the educational information you have been giving to us, thank you for doing this blog, you do great work.

    Like

  21. Statistics in respect of those who died before their time. Necessary high impact stats from whichever angle you look. I guess that’s all there is without people like you keeping their memory alive.

    Like

  22. Interesting statistics GP. It’s a shame that that’s what the fallen become though 😦

    Like

  23. The numbers hit hard when they are put together like that. And the figures don’t include those who suffered trauma and life long problems because of their war experiences.

    Like

  24. Absolutely mind boggling. I’ve made a real effort to give “statistics” perspective – each time my mind settles upon the numbers, my heart breaks as lives melt into numbers on a page. Thank you for all that you do in shaking my foundation to the core – the humanity you honour those figures with, gives their lives meaning 🙂

    Like

  25. Pierre Lagacé

    I appreciate the fact you put those numbers from the highest to the lowest and not calculate an average.

    Like

  26. Pierre Lagacé

    The most cruel death in the Forgotten War was dying for your country in a foreign country, and being remembered as a statistic people can’t agree upon.

    Like

  1. Pingback: Remembering Korea | Pacific Paratrooper

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