Korean War (38)

3 RAR defenses on the Jamestown Line, Jan. 1953

3 RAR defenses on the Jamestown Line, Jan. 1953

14 February 1953, after four days of Operation Clam Up, during which time the enemy fired 344 rounds of artillery and 1,469 rounds of mortar, they concentrated their attention on Hill 930. (The approach south to Tonpyang and Hills 812 & 854 and lost about 129 casualties, mostly KIA.)  An enemy prisoner, captured from the 45th North Korean Division, stated the reason for their reduced activity was to wait until a South Korean unit replaced the Marines and for the weather to change.  They had been prepared to occupy Hill 854 when they arrived carrying their packs, extra clothing and rations.  Operation Clam Up was terminated the following day.

DUKW

DUKW

During the 14th, the island of Hwangto-do received 40 rounds of fire and 2 bunkers caved in; 2 US ships provided counterbattery fire.  Yo-do received 84 rounds and had 2 men killed and 9 wounded, including a USMC officer.  The Korean Marine Corps (KMC) command post had a direct hit, 3 DUKWs were damaged, 2 squad tents destroyed, the aid station damaged and the telephone wires were downed.

islands of Wonsan

islands of Wonsan

28 February, the aircraft from Task Force 77 bombed and strafed Pusan’s #2 power plant.  An examination of the enemy fire power, for the month, from shore batteries showed that 90% were directed toward UN bulwarks and 10% against shore vessels.

Mao & Stalin

Mao & Stalin

5 March, Stalin passed away and his successor, Georgi Malenkov, announced that “there is no disputed or unresolved question that can not be settled peacefully.”

Georgy Malenkov

Georgy Malenkov

For the 1st Marine Division, March as a whole was relatively quiet.  The reason for this being that the Chinese were preparing for their next offensive against the UN line.  A major victory would be to their advantage as the peace talks were to resume shortly.  By 10 March, the 3rd Battalion had replaced the 7th Marines on the MLR.

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The map shows the sectors of the battalion during this “quiet” time.  Sgt. Jess Meado was recorded, as the spring thaw arrived:  “My squad had one of those outposts which was always under mortar fire.  There was also a sniper who shot at us persistently.  We fired rifle grenades each morning and received mortar fire in return…we went on patrol one dark and rainy night, crossing waist-deep streams.  Mud was everywhere.  We heard the gooks working on their wires and cans and we were told to shoot at them and then move out fast.  We all fired at once and their mortars hit the area we had just returned from.”

In an event at George Company’s CP position, Sgt. Meado related:  “A Chinese 76mm shell hit the front of the bunker, blowing up our mail box.  A piece of that round had gone through the doorway of another bunker, hitting the last of 4 men who were sitting in a row,  I ran over to see if I could help and the corpsman asked me to get his first-aid bag which was in the CP bunker.

“I barely got back to the wounded man when another 76mm went through the CP bunker… 7 men had been inside, 5 of them ran out.”  The two men Meado pulled out were dead:  “Pfc Donel Earnest and Pfc James Kimball would have gone home on the next draft out.”

Korean prisoners of war

Korean prisoners of war

POWs in UN custody became even more anxious about their fates.  The Koreans who wanted repatriation numbered 66,754 POWs and civilians.  Virtually all the non-repatriates were former soldiers: 35,597 Korean & 14,280 Chinese.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Personal note – 

Once again, for our newest readers, I wish to iterate that the dates omitted from these posts in no way suggests that the combat action on land or sea was silent.  If I have omitted any episode that you have knowledge of – Please, by all means, include it in the comments for others to view.

My e-mail address is not actually associated with this site and any messages delivered that are not in my contacts, go to Spam and are deleted.  So, please send your stories and links to research sites in the comments for everyone.

Thank you for being here, for being so loyal and helpful – I couldn’t be continuing on this site without you!

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Farewell Salutes – 

Joseph Albano – NYC; US Army, WWII, PTO

RCAF badge

RCAF badge

Stanley Cogdell – Pointe-Claire, Quebec; RACF, WWII, Flight Engineer

Albert Fara – Chicago, IL; US Army, Korea

Gregory Hutchinson – Washington DC; US Army (Ret.) Lt. Colonel

Mary (nee Tierney) Kennedy – Elmhurst, IL; WAVES, WWII

Jeremy Maristany – Scotsdale, AZ; USMC, Sgt., 11th Marines; Iraqi Operations

Martin O’Neill – E.Islip, NY; US Army, Korea & VietnamWAVES

Troy Ogden – Long Beach, CA; US Army, 511th Reg., WWII, PTO

Rudolph Pick – Vienna, Austria & Falls Church, VA; Czech Div. of British Army in Belgium & Dunkirk, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 19, 2014, in Korean War, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 53 Comments.

  1. Thank you for this informative blog! 🙂

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  2. Great post, I must confess I had never heard of Georgy Malenkov, quite a profound statement he has made there, I will google to find out more on his leadership overall.
    Regards
    Ian

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  3. As ever, we much appreciate it.

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  4. I wanted to give you a personal acknowledgement for all you do to create this blog. Having done a bit of research myself, I know the time and energy it takes to create a post, especially one about history in which accuracies need to be checked and double checked. You enrich it even more by including appropriate photos and images, which also have to be searched for and then your acknowledgement to those who have passed make this an especially honorable blog.

    Now, don’t blush at the compliment, just accept it as is…you are doing a fantastic service towards filling in the gaps our educational system failed to deliver on. Though I understand why you won’t write a book on the subjects, I do hope that scholars around the world see the value of your collection of events and photos and do something worthwhile with it.

    Again, thank you for your amazing contribution to history.

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  5. To be so close to being sent back home after serving their country – only to be KIA by a chance shell. Their families must have cried for days.

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  6. *like* … your like button is not loading for me so sending it another way 😉

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  7. It’s like there was never a break or relief – “My squad had one of those outposts which was always under mortar fire. There was also a sniper who shot at us persistently.” Enough to make any sane person go crazy. And I don’t ever remember hearing of that George Malenkov…. If our history lessons were so selective (I do realize that everything couldn’t be included), I can’t imagine how little today’s youth are being taught….

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    • They squeeze a lot more info into their days I imagine and their laptops, notebooks and I-Pads I’m sure help them. A lot of data we lived thru – they have to learn (or not) according to their schools, I guess.

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  8. I am curious to know; who ,or which section, records the enemy fire? And who records the fire that is returned?

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  9. An amazing photo of Stalin and Mao – where do you find them! Interesting post as always with the carnage continuing.

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  10. Always enjoy your posts and want to thank you for including some pictures I would never have seen along with the maps. They make it more interesting for me.

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  11. Until I read this post, I hadn’t realized that there was a Soviet leader between Stalin and Khrushchev.

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  12. Reading your Korean War posts is like experiencing the history of that war for the first time.

    Oddly enough, in all to many instances, that’s exactly what’s happened. So much to learn about that didn’t make it into my history books in my time…!

    Thank you for your on-going efforts to make sure that history comes together in a way that focuses on the human element of wear, not just the big battles and the major players.

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    • To me, war is at the lower level. The generals may have the titles and publicity, but the foot soldiers, cooks, navigators – everyone had to actually be in the heat of it. Thank you for saying I have been accomplishing that!

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  13. Korea is so often perceived as simply an episode within the Cold War, it’s still a very important war.

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  14. Thank you for “Liking” “About Harold”. on my photography blog http://www.throughharoldslens.com. On behalf of the Through Harold’s Lens Creative Team, my trusty sidekick Mr. SLR Nikon, his brother Mr. Pen Pal and myself, we truly appreciate your enjoyment. We hope you continue to join us on our journeys.  

    Best Regards,
    Harold

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  15. As always, it is with the greatest interest that I catch up with knowledge of this sadly underplayed conflict.

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  16. Thanks for sharing this with us. Love your writings and the photos, the men would be so honored.

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  17. Another wonderful post – thank you for all that you do.

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