Korean War (31)

7th Fleet action

7th Fleet action

 

Aerial reconnaissance became indispensable in the strategy of increased aerial bombardment when the target planners sought more lucrative targets.  Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea, was fairly unscathed until 11 July 1952 when the 7th Fleet, the 1st Marine Air Wing, the 5th Air Force, the British Navy and the ROK Air Force struck the targets named on the recon reports.  Along with the results mentioned in previous posts, supply dumps, factories, barracks, AA gun sites and railroad facilities were hit.

HMS Belfast during bombardment

HMS Belfast during bombardment

15 July, 156 North Korean soldiers in 2 small junks and 4 wooden folding boats attempted to invade Changnin-do island.  The HMS BelfastAmethyst and aircraft from the USS Bataan assisted the South Korean guerrillas while under fire themselves.  There were secondary explosions and the guns were silenced.  Two days later, the island was back in friendly hands; 60 enemy KIA, 30 drowned while trying to escape, 41 captured and 5 MIA.  The guerrillas had 8 KIA and 12 wounded.

Korean map, 7th Air Force

Korean map, 7th Air Force

The USS Orleck (DD 886) caught 5 flat cars and 10 box cars while they were between tunnels.  Ten heavy field guns on the flat cars and the explosives in the box cars were destroyed.

23 July, during the last week of July, the units of the Underwater Demolition Team 5, supported by the USS Diachenko and 2 ROKN motor torpedo boats, conducted 6 successful raids against enemy fishing facilities.  Besides destroying the nets, boats and waterfront buildings, they returned with 5 prisoners.

26 July, a ROK intelligence report stated that a large scale exodus was leaving Kaesong.  The agent that brought the news said that families of high-ranking officers, the supply corps for the Panmunjom troops and most other troops had left during the past 2 weeks.

27 July, the Sindok lead and zinc mill that shipped about 3,000 tons of processed metals to Russia via China each month was 75% destroyed by Task Force – 77 aircraft.  The rainy season in Korea had started and ground troops across the entire Korean front decreased their activity.

Douglas Skyraider

Douglas Skyraider

28 July, 38 US naval aircraft, 13 AD (Douglas “Skyraider” single-engine plane) and 25 F4U (Vought “Corsair” single-engine fighter), in two strike groups off the USS Princeton attacked a magnesium plant and their facilities at Kilchu.  The damage was estimated at 60%.

29-31 July, Colonel William Westmoreland USMC, also a paratrooper, took command of the 187th Regimental Combat Team, ‘Rakkasans’ in Taegu.  The rainfall average was 3″.  The US FEAF B-29s hit the aluminum works near the Manchurian border, 4 miles south of the Yalu River.  The largest night raid to date.

PBM-5 Mariner aircraft

PBM-5 Mariner aircraft

Over the Yellow Sea, 2 MiG-15s attacked a navy PBM (Martin “Mariner” twin-engine flying boat) on a recon mission.  The tail gunner and one other man was killed and tail turret was knocked out.  The PBM lowered to 250 feet as the enemy continued its attacks and then returned north.  The PBM was forced to land at Paengyong-do for repairs and care for 2 men injured.

During July, the bad weather hampered carrier operations and also restricted those of the Marine Air Wing.

Click images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Purple Heart

Purple Heart

Gordon Frank Anderson – Christchurch, NZ; 5th Field Regiment, gunner, WWII

Charles Edward Baxter – Waiuku, NZ, RAF/RNZAF

Perry Ensall – Dale City, VA; US Army, WWII ETO, Battle of the Bulge, Purple Heart

Albert Guay – Winchester, VA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Lt. Colonel

Frank DiPietro – Fitchburg, MA & Tucson, AZ; US Navy, WWII PTO, USS Hughes

Phillip Seader – Washington DC & Tucson, AZ; US Navy, WWII

Edward Skube – Front Royal, VA; US Navy, Captain (Retired 1977)

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Personal note –

I would like to mention that our long-time fellow blogger, Gallivanta, for assisting in the Farewell Salutes for New Zealand; her additions are in the comment section.  Her site can be found at:

http://silkannthreades.wordpress.com

 

I also wish to express a Congrats to the Navy Midshipmen for their win at the Army-Navy game this past Saturday.

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on December 16, 2013, in Korean War and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 30 Comments.

  1. Another interesting reading, was intrigued with your mention of folding wooden boats.
    Emu

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    • Thank you, Gallavanta – very good link. The video is short, but the photography is good and the information is straight forward and to the point. I hope many watch this because the Kiwi data often becomes confused with the overall British statistics.

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      • Yes, I thought it very well done. I am in the middle of watching a longer film from that site which is also good because it moves from footage of post WW2 Japan to the war in Korea.

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  2. Thanks for your kind mention 🙂 I have recently rediscovered some New Zealand history magazines that have been ‘hiding’ in the attic. There are some articles on WW2 in them which may be of interest.. have to look at them properly. Nothing on Korea as far as I could tell with a quick glance. In today’s notices there was a farewell to Campbell James Black (formerly of Nelson, NZ) L/Bombardier, WWll. At the weekend I also watched this documentary on TV http://www.nzonscreen.com/title/lost-in-libya-2009. The NZ on screen website has other wonderful films and footage of NZers at war, although as yet I haven’t identified anything specific to Korea.

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    • Take your time going thru them and you’ll have the info all set for when we get back to WWII. I do know how much New Zealand assisted Britain during 1939–41, but the more data on the Pacfic War the better.

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  3. Fascinating. I hope this isn’t a case of history repeating itself.

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  4. When I read this, it seems suicidal for them to have even gone to battle against us.

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  5. I went to the model aircraft web site and enjoyed it, the planes and his cats, thanks, jim

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  6. Amazing the Mariner escaped the MiGs! But all these “lesser” actions (I know – poor use of words since people were killed or wounded) help bring to light the fighting that had to take place to win wars. And I am amazed, still, at the coordination and accuracy of off-shore batteries; the destruction of the train is one example…and this was before guided munitions and GPS!

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  7. Thanks for sharing these amazing pictures and the informative write-ups.
    Regards.

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  8. great pic of CV-33…nevertheless the “Kearsarge” was not involved in the July 1952 raids…

    ” Kearsarge recommissioned on 15 February 1952 with Captain Louis B. French in command. Following shakedown, the carrier cleared San Diego on 11 August for intensive flight training in the Hawaiian Islands. Her readiness complete, she sailed for the Far East to engage in combat missions in the Korean War. Arriving Yokosuka on 8 September, Kearsarge joined the fast carrier Task Force 77 (TF 77) off the east coast of Korea six days later. For the next five months, the carrier’s planes flew nearly 6,000 sorties against Communist forces in North Korea, unleashing considerable damage on enemy positions. She completed her tour in late February 1953, returning to her home port of San Diego on 17 March. ”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Kearsarge_(CV-33)

    Greetings 🙂

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  9. As Artie suggests above, that distant war was far enough out of sight and out of mind that those at home could enjoy the “gentler period”—the period I especially think of as ‘the Rockwell years’.
    In the US Rockwell caught the spirit, in the UK the Brit cartoonist Giles captured it wonderfully with a gentle penetrating wit. I don’t think we could match either today.

    I don’t follow sport, but can’t help feeling all warm and fuzzy: Navy beat Army, yay~!

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  10. The mention of future general William Westmoreland caught my attention. Nice report.

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  11. One would have thought they would have realised that the Changnin-do invasion was doomed to failure.
    That PBM was lucky not to have been shot down.

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  12. All I remember about the Korean War in the 1950s were the model airplanes I made and painted as a kid. Except for the war, it was a kinder gentler period of American history. Jim

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