Korean War (29)

Junks

Junks

9 May 1952, a daring and highly successful raid was carried out by the Haeju Patrol and Defense Unit, along with air strikes from the HMS Ocean and gunfire support of the HMAS Bataan.  A large amount of enemy supplies were captured, 150 enemy KIA, they destroyed 27 houses and damaged 50 others.

23 May, the HMCS Athabaskan received enemy gun shots, but silenced them in short order in the Taedong Man area.  On the east coast, Kosong area, the USS Douglas H. Fox received enemy shore gun fire, but also located and eliminated the problem.  The next day in the Kojo area, the Fox did the same.  The ROK government declared martial law in Pusan and the arrests of the Korean National Assembly began.

MiG Alley circled

MiG Alley circled

25 May, MiG-15s were again increasing their aggressive actions in northwest Korea.  The progressive increase, all during the month, indicated the enemy’s intention to defend the area between the Yalu and Chonzchoin Rivers.  On the west coast, guerrillas carried out a raid in the Pongyang-ni area with the support of the HMS Belfast & Whitesand Bay, LST 1089 and the USS Bataan aircraft.  Reports showed 300 enemy KIA and 4 captured.

HMCS Nootka

HMCS Nootka

31 May, the HMCS Nootka on northern patrol with the USS John W. Thompson & Endicott received 160 rounds from 7 enemy coastal radar-controlled guns east of Chuuronjang and not one hit.  The naval counter-fire damaged 4 guns.  At Hongwan Roads, the armed whaleboat from the USS Murrelet encountered 2 enemy sampans who faked their surrender.  The enemy tossed a grenade and followed with small arms fire – none of the enemy survived as the Americans returned fire. (A site to see the Nootka and crewmen is at: http://www.picsearch.com/HMCS-Nootka-pictures.html)

**With all this action I am relating, many others have been omitted.  What so many resources refer to as a “lull in fighting” by land and sea forces is inaccurate.  The UN forces had been and continued to go above and beyond what the historians and I relate.

Marine Fighter Squadron 312

Marine Fighter Squadron 312

1 June, the HMS Constance captured her fourth enemy junk.  This one contained 3 Chinese soldiers and 15 un-friendlies.   The island of Yongi-do is once again in friendly guerrilla hands; after persistent fighting, the enemy returned to the mainland.  The Marine Fighter Squadron 312 aboard the USS Bataan received a congratulatory message from RAdmiral John Gingrich for their outstanding performances under difficult conditions during the last operating period.

Aerial view of Wonsan bombing damage

Aerial view of Wonsan bombing damage

4-5 June, the Fast Carrier Task Force accumulated and submitted a list of major power plants in North Korea suitable for air and gun strikes.  Plan ‘Insomnia’, an operation involving groups working midnight to daylight in heckling the enemy, destroyed 4 locomotives.  At Wonsan, 3 US ships fired on and silenced the 75mm enemy guns firing on the minesweepers.

6-7 June, the USS Symbol accepted the voluntary surrender of 8 North Koreans.  The HMCS Nootka destroyed one sampan and captured one with 3 prisoners.

Amphibious Construction Battalion

Amphibious Construction Battalion

9 June, the guerrilla garrison on Mu-do successfully repelled an enemy attack and destroyed 4 of the 7 junks used for the attempted invasion.  A detachment of 3 officers and 75 men of the Amphibious Construction Battalion One began the construction of an emergency landing strip on Yo-do Island (Wonsan).

11 June, intelligence reported that an order had been issued to North Korean and Chinese troops to prepare for offensive action.  Also, the largest enemy troop and supply concentrations of the war had already been accumulated at Sibyou-ni, Yangdok, Koksan, Hoeyang and Pyongyang.  A recon party in a motor whaleboat from the USS Buck saw no activity, but a sampan with 6 North Korean soldiers voluntarily surrendered to the ship off Kosong.  The POWs were delivered  to the 1st ROK Corps Intelligence Unit.

14 June, the USS Skagit, LSM 226 and LSTs of Task Force 90 began to lift engineers and equipment to selected sites for the new POW compounds in preparation for further dispersal of prisoners that still remained at the riotous Koje-do site.

Click on images to enlarge.

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WWII Update…

the "Flying Pencil" (Archaeology magazine)

the “Flying Pencil”
(Archaeology magazine)

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Farewell Salutes – 

John Lovering, Sr. – Sommerville, MA & Rockville, MD; US Navy, WWII, Naval Air crewman and radio gunner

Gleason Moore – Providence, RI & Riviera Beach, FL; US Army, Vietnam

Arthur Francis O’Day – Stoughton, MA & NYC, NY; US Army, 51st Signal Battalion, Korea

Dante J. Orsini, Sr. – South Glen Falls, NY; USMC, WWII, FDR Presidental Guard & PTO

Louis Ristaino, Sr. – East Boston, MA; US Army, WWII

James “Alex” Trieste – Delray Beach, FL; US Navy, Vietnam

Zenon Wisnicki – Toronto, Canada; Royal Canadian Air Force

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 24, 2013, in Korean War, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 29 Comments.

  1. What occurs to me each time I come for a visit is that I consider I had a fairly good public school education in the 1950’s/60’s. BUT….I am so ignorant about so much of the United State’s history. Thank you for taking the time to tell these very interesting and important chapters, and know many well educated people are reading of these events for the first time.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for the enlightning read into the Korean conflict, my only real knowledge of the conflict is from some Korean vets who I served with in Vietnam, a pitiful excuse coming from someone who has served twenty years in the army, your posts give a true account which can be easily followed.
    Thanks
    Ian

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Junks?? Egads. 🙂

    On your Wonsan report, it mentions 75mm guns were silenced from offshore. I believe 75’s had quite a reach so the naval fire must have come from a cruiser-size up?

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  4. “The enemy tossed a grenade and followed with small arms fire – none of the enemy survived as the Americans returned fire.”
    Maybe I don’t always understand everything about war that I’m reading but I can’t help but get a mental picture of the defiant mouse giving a “hand signal” to the eagle just before the eagle takes him out.

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    • They thought they were luring in our men by pretending to surrender and then throwing the grenade – they got a big surprise, didn’t they?! Thanks for stopping in, Linda, always a pleasure.

      Like

  5. The ‘lull’ saw a lot of business as usual, it would seem.

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    • It sure seemed that way to me. I got to that section and thought – what now? Do I just tell my readers that nothing happened? Then I looked at office records – and low and behold – not much had changed, fighting was, as you said, business as usual.

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  6. I think it’s true that the Navy is forgotten too often ( in the Forgotten War ) , so I appreciate this and other of your posts about the Navy war . Lots of ships were lost , I understand , mostly to mines . As I’ve said , my dad’s ship was out there after WWII tours .

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  7. I don’t know if my comment got through…

    My wife’s uncle (who was aboard the Athabaskan during WWII) told us he was also served aboard the Nootka. He did not say much about it.

    Veterans don’t tell…

    Like

  8. I never realized that the junks were used in that manner. Kind of a navy? Just never dawned on me. By the way one of the trivia questions today is on MASH. Threw it in for you.

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  9. Thanks for the DO 17 Flying Pencil mention. For those interested it is being restored at the RAF museum Cosford UK (my old RAF training school).
    Conservation project : http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/cosford/things-to-see-and-do/dornier-17-conservation.aspx

    Like

    • Thanks for the info and link, Mike. I really appreciate it when readers join in; you are all considered friends helping to spice up my site from my drab writing.

      Like

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