Korean War (28)

harbor picture at Wonsan

harbor picture at Wonsan

 

21 April 1952, during combat operations off Kojo, a serious powder fire developed in the No. 1, 8″ turret on the USS St. Paul; 30 men were killed as a result.  ROK troops left the USS Horace A. Bass to commence 8 different amphibious landings.  Their missions being to acquire intelligence and destroy what they could all along the northeast coast of Korea.  This operation would last 2 weeks.

25 April, intelligence reported a stockpiling of sand and gravel along the rail spur at Pyongyang East airfield which indicated that the North Korean Air Force was planning to repair the jet base.  An aerial photo of the bays, just west of No-do Pan-do (Wonsan) showed 83 small boats and 17  60-foot vessels.

USS St. Paul

USS St. Paul

30 April, the USS Horace A. Bass had a successful landing party go ashore on the north coast of Korea.  They exploded a 120-pound charge on a railroad bridge and an 80-pound charge on the adjacent tracks.  A north bound train was halted by 57mm rifle fire.  When another engine began pulling the train south, it was hit by the firing from the USS Doyle.  The landing party returned to the ship with 3 prisoners.

1 May, aerial photos showed the presence of 8 new heavy AA guns and 8 automatic weapons protecting rail and highway bridges southwest of Hamhung.  This was the first confirmation of heavy gun movement on the east coast.  In the Haeju area, an enemy commander was killed, documents were confiscated and 12 prisoners captured.

General Mark Clark

General Mark Clark

5 May, General Mark Clark assumed the command of the UN Far East Command.  6 May, the USS Douglas H. Fox captured 3 sampans and 15 North Koreans in the Singhang-ni region and later that same day, captured a 32′ sampan and 23 North Koreans around Paegan-dan.  Aerial recon reported a lot of enemy road traffic in Wonsan and on the roads south.  Guerrillas reported that the Chinese troops were reinforcing the peninsula opposite the island of Yongmae-do.

USS Douglad H. Fox

USS Douglad H. Fox

Douglas H. Fox, DD779 patch

Douglas H. Fox, DD779 patch

7 May, the USS James C. Owens battled with 6 gun batteries near the Songjin Lighthouse.  She was hit 6 times with 2 men killed and 7 wounded.  She also received some material damage, but operation readiness was still satisfactory.  Aerial recon spotted 4,000 enemy vehicles in North Korea, the most activity to date.

8 May, the 5th Air Force changed its priorities from transportation networks to North Korean depots and industry.; now under the command of MGen. Glen Barcus, while Gen. Mark Clark took the UN command.

12 May, in the Wonsan are, the US ships Maddox, Laffey, Herbert J. Thomas and Evansville, along with minesweepers were engaged in an hour-long battle; 3 enemy gun positions were destroyed.  In the Hungnam area, the USS Douglas H. Fox sent out an armed raiding party in a motorized whale boat.  She was fired on by rifle fire and gun batteries which were silenced in short order.  The landing party returned with 30 prisoners.  Six aircraft left the Valley Forge and Princeton at night and destroyed 9 locomotives.

14 May, the First Marine Division began Operation Timber.  This was a tedious collection and movement of logs for bunker construction.  These may seem to be a minor mention, but operations such as these were vital to the UN defense.

 

On the east coast, Marine Patrol Group TG 95.2, while interrogating 7 POWs, learned that the enemy was planning an attack on Yodo soon, with about 80 fishing sampans for transport.  The enemy troops for that operation were already massing at 2 locations near He-do Pan-do.

Click onto images to enlarge.

###############################################################

Vietnam Hero…

Heroic Vietnam veteran's story

Heroic Vietnam veteran’s story

#############################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Roger O’Neil Boyer – Fleetwood, PA & N.Palm Bch., FL; US Navy, USS Intrepid

Bronze Star

Bronze Star

Robert Campo – Sommerville, MA; USMC, Korea

Andrew “Van” Cason, Jr.; Delray Beach, FL; US Army, on island of New Caledonia, WWII

Donald Hansen – Maynard, MA; US Navy, Ensign, USS New York, WWII

Sylvia Gelders McLaren – Tampa, FL; USO, WWII, the “Melodears”

Richard Fremont-Smith – Boston, MA & Ft. Lauderdale, FL; US Coast Guard 22 years, Vietnam, Bronze Star, CG Liasion Officer to Asst. Sec. of Defense at the Pentagon and then Red Cross.

George Weston – Montreal, Canada; Grenadier, WWII, CANLOAN officer, Lt. in Glasgow Highlanders

Milton “Mac” Uloth – Burlington, Canada; RCNVR, Lieutenant, WWII

 

##################################################################

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 21, 2013, in Korean War and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 33 Comments.

  1. Vietnam hero indeed . . . I’ve visited the Air Force Academy a few times, but don’t remember the statue. I will have to look for it when I’m there next.

    Provided it’s in the area open to visitors.

    Like

  2. Another great look back into the history of the Korean war.
    Emu

    Like

  3. You wrote “minor mention” but this is indeed war at its worst, possibly. I feel it was during these “minor” scuffles when courage went undocumented and at worst, KIA’s were unrecoverable. What do you think?

    The report on the fire on board the USS St. Paul was bewildering. 30 dead… I cannot imagine what went on. The USS Iowa explosion, I think, killed more that that was apparently an explosion…

    Like

    • I had difficulty finding data on this stage, as the historians continue to claim it was a “lull” period. Cold weather, etc. DID reduced action but it did not halt it. That info on the ships was all I could locate in the time I had to look into it; let me know if you happen to find more.

      Like

  4. That first picture seems so desolate. But then that’s war for ya. All the logistics involved boggles the mind. Great story about Risner.

    Like

  5. Thinking about the current US warship presence in the Philippines; the USS George Washington with its 5000 personnel and 18,000 meals a day. Huge! Also the fact that the US troops are once again on Leyte. Nothing to do with Korea…just thinking about logistics and supplies and everything one needs to run a navy in peacetime and wartime.

    Like

  6. I reckon you should write a book about this

    Like

  7. Good to see that mundane ops get a mention. There are more than bombs and bullets to a war. Risner quote made me laugh out loud. Good stuff.

    Like

  8. Five stars, gpcox!

    Like others, the Risner story was inspirational.

    Few of us experience challenges nearly as grim as POWs, and I am glad you help us to remember people like J. Robinson Risner and their stories.

    Like

  9. Liked the Risner comment to the former Russian MiG 15 pilot. Another great post.

    Like

  10. I would like to add my comment about Risner…
    Lost for words…

    Like

  11. Even without major confrontations the smaller-scale operations were unrelenting.
    Risner was amazing.

    Like

  12. Great clip on Risner!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: