National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day

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“…the wrong war in the wrong place at the wrong time.” _______ General Omar Bradley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

Armistice signing

Armistice signing

No single incident caused the catastrophic events that became WWII and the wars that sprang out of those six years also had their seeds dropped many decades before. Those of you that read my post “Setting the stage for war” at https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2012/09/14/setting-the-stage-for-war/ or have read the book, The Imperial Cruise by James Bradley, have an idea of which I speak. I could go back into history as far as Marco Polo, but I’ll spare you my rambling.

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Teddy Roosevelt declared, “Our future history will be more determined by our position on the Pacific facing China than our position on the Atlantic facing Europe.” He was eager to see American strength spread across Asia just as it had gone across the North American continent. He also stated, “I wish to see the United States as the dominant power on the shores of the Pacific Ocean.” Though he knew very little of the Orient or its culture, he favorite motto – “Speak softly and carry a big stick.” – would cause a ripple that would grow into the tidal wave of conflicts still felt today.

korean war memorial

I realize it is unusual to begin a section on Korea with the date that the war came to a close, but the calender of events is unavoidable.

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A look at the “high-life” in the 1950’s ____

 

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It may not look like much – but WE had fun!!

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes –

Stephen Voss – Boca Raton, FL; U.S. Navy Medic, WWII, 6th Naval Beach Battalion, wounded on Omaha Easy Red II section of Normandy invasion. One year later, invasion of Okinawa.

Sylvia Yelverton – Fitchburg, MA & W.Palm Beach, FL; U.S. Air Force during Korean and Vietnam WarsSparkling-Flag-398x224

John Bretherton – Charleston, SC; U.S. Navy, WWII, on USS Jensen (Atlantic) and Hospital ship, USS Haven (Pacific)

Ernest Bates – Canton, OH; PA & Greenacres, FL; Sgt. U.S. Army Air Corps, WWII

Michael Diesel – Brooklyn, NY & Lake Worth, FL; U.S. Navy, WWII

Samuel Grundfast – Boynton Beach, FL; U.S. Navy, WWII

Robert LaCasse – Millinocket & Skowhegan, ME; US Army, WWII

Ethel Moore – Kamloops, Can. & Los Angeles, CA; RC Army, nurse, WWII, chosen to represent Canada at the coronation of King George VI

Bernard Wallach – Bronx, NY & Lake Worth, FL; U.S. Navy, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on July 27, 2013, in Korean War and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 83 Comments.

  1. I want to thank you once again for helping to catch me up on so many areas of US History I need to know and understand. So many `thoughtful and spot on comments accompany this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, I love the comments! Many times we will get more information, first-hand stories and links to accompany the post. I urge all the readers to look over the comments when they are finished with the post. No one continues to learn more than I, that’s for sure!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Many years later and Australian Vietnam vets are still behind the eight ball.
    As the years pass by I feel the governments and departments are biding their time for our passing, the same will happen with vets from the current conflicts.
    Ian

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Quite synchronistic, this. I was reflecting in the context of a WW1 book I am editing how, in history, things that spark off major events may have something lighting the fuse, but the laying of the fuse and explosive usually goes way back to any number of other things.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It certainly does…usually major events are spotlighted as the cause and or influence, but once the data is collected and put in order – WOW. That is an excellent metaphor you made!!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Reblogged this on The ObamaCrat™.

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  5. i never tire of reading your fascinating military history blogs, Keep ’em coming!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. It’s sad to say I’d almost forgotten about Vietnam and Korean Vets being denied VFW membership. I’m a Vietnam-era Vet myself. I will never forget or forgive the ill treatment of returning Vietnam Veterans. Forgive me if you’ve already mentioned the passing and subsequent recent burial of Jeremiah Denton at Arlington.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I remember that!! I went to my father, Smitty (who was an officer in the VFW at the time in Hallandale, FL) and told him I knew a Nam vet being denied membership at the Delray post, He went ballistic!!! Dad said, if he couldn’t do anything about Delray – send the man down to him. The vet was installed at the Delray VFW about a week or two later. A little common sense was all it took! (and whatever else Smitty said to them!) 😉

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  7. Pierre Lagacé

    Reposting is a great idea. It’s like watching an old movie classic.

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    • Yes, I couldn’t come up with any better ideas yesterday than I already had, Pierre, but I did have things I wanted to add – such as the honoring of the 108 year old veteran!!

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  8. I didn’t even realize there was a Korean War Armistice Day. Obviously there was, the thing had a beginning and an ending, unlike the messes with which we’ve managed to get involved today.
    Bless the poor soldiers who have endured any war.
    “Imagine there’s no countries
    It isn’t hard to do
    Nothing to kill or die for.”
    John Lennon

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Reblogged this on pacificparatrooper and commented:

    A COMMEMORATIVE HOLIDAY OFTEN FORGOTTEN. PLEASE VIEW THIS REVISED ARMISTICE DAY POST OF MINE TO HONOR THE TROOPS.

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  10. Pierre Lagacé

    A reblogué ceci sur Lest We Forget and commented:
    About the Forgotten War… Korea 1950-1953

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  11. Well done.

    Smedly Butler had many of the same observations.

    War, certainly is a racket…personal agenda’s, greed, competition, do very little for a national state – if the effort is not done in thte true defense of its interests – that would be Cultural – not economic (since we are dependent on ourselves, firstly).

    Looking forward to more yoeman work.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Your postings reveal the dubious characters that lie behind the exteriors of most politicians. It makes their decisions to send troops to war even more nefarious and the aims malignant. What hurts most is their disregard and lack of respect for the mental and physical scars left upon those who have survived the ravages of combat. Your postings are all the more valuable because they reveal what so many would prefer remained hidden. Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. I am so glad that you are covering this…all of it is new information to me and I look forward to learning from your posts. By the way, the Memorial in your picture is fantastic, very moving to walk through.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I love these comments, and don’t think I could add to them. But I am so looking forward to your posts on the Korean War — it’s the war we were fighting when I was born. I had no idea about the “police action” discrimination. I have a lot to learn, and your blog is a great place to start.

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  15. I am looking forward to your posts on the Korean War.

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  16. I’m still reeling over the thought that 1 in 10 American soldiers in the Korean War died. As a kid growing up, I really didn’t appreciate that my father was in the Korean War. It was close enough to WWII that the implication from society was that those were the real heroes and the Korean War wasn’t a “real war.”

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  17. I’ve always been so conflicted about TR. I love his energy and big family. I love his house Sagamore and the story of his childhood, but his expansionist views really disappoint me. People are so flawed, but I love them still.

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  18. I visited the Korean War Memorial several years ago, and enjoyed the pictures in this post.

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  19. Great post. My father was an EDT for the Navy during the Korean Conflict. He had to take his dog tags off, he was dropped a mile from the Chinese shore, told to make maps and be at the same spot in the water 24 hours later. You’d think talking to him he went around the corner to pick up a newspaper….

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  20. The Korean War is somewhat similar in treatment as Japan’s is to WWII. In fact, you can bet if you stopped a commuter in Japan and asked, “What do you know of Iwo Jima?”, they likely don’t know diddly-squat.

    I’ve always wanted to ask of how you manage to notify us of the passing of our heroes… It must take a lot of diligence to find these. Very noble of you!

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  21. The Korean war sometimes seems like the forgotten war, except to those who lived through or fought in it, so I’m really looking forward to reading more of your posts.

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  22. THE IMPERIAL CRUISE, incidentally, turned out to be one of the better books I’ve read on the topic of American expansionism/colonialism/imperialism/whatever-you-feel-comfortable-calling-it! Thanks for the recommendation! It does have some irritating qualities (the references to Alice Roosevelt as The Princess, and Willian H. Taft as “Big Bill”, over and over: yes, I got your point, Mr. Bradley! She was spoiled and he was fat!), but the content and scholarship stand up, making this an informative book that helps demythologize American continental expansion in the first century of our national life and the continuing involvement in international affairs.

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    • I was very glad that you had acquired the book, now you can see how difficult it is for me to condense the info and try to make it interesting at the same time. The newspapers are the ones the made Alice the “Princess” sometimes we really grab at straws to find a ‘role model.’

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      • That is the understatement of the century! It also shows how well you do get across the ideas and information you present. This is one of my favorite history-based blogs. You do honor, I think, to those who served and those you mention.

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  23. It’s interesting that I didn’t care for history classes when I was in school and now I find it fascinating. I suppose growing up and older brings the reality of how important it really is. I’m looking forward to learning about the Korean War. I know next to nothing.

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  24. 1905 Teddy Roosevelt got the Nobel Prize for peace. He sent his VP Cleveland, I think to negotiate with Japan and Russia to hold peace. He was worried about the military ambitions of Japan which was eyeing Korea and the Philippines. The prize to keep Japanese off the latter was give it control over Korea under a special treaty. Japan went to korea and China as well. It would lead eventually to Korean War. After Japan’s surrender rising tide of Communism in China would ensure it. Vietnam War was not yet in the cards but would take shape.

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  25. Pierre Lagacé

    I know I will love this…

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  26. I confess to knowing very little about the Korean War. Thanks for the reminder to learn more 🙂

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