Missed photos – YTD

As the 11th Airborne Division plans to move on to Okinawa, I am posting additional photos that I previously omitted to avoid clutter and distract from the stories. I hope you enjoy them.

Luzon cemetery

Luzon cemetery

Smitty wrote on the reverse side of this picture that it was the first cemetery on the island that they built. The shadowy figure on the bottom has always been a mystery. My father said no one was there when it was taken, but to me it does appear to be a man.

Graves of the fallen, Manila U.S. cemetery today

Graves of the fallen, Manila U.S. cemetery today

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Major William C. Lee, Father of the Airborne

Major William C. Lee, Father of the Airborne

plaque in front of Luzon Memorial

plaque in front of Luzon Memorial

Luzon Memorial

Luzon Memorial

Memorial in Manila

Memorial in Manila

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Smitty must not have always been on patrol or training recruits, the photograph on the left was addressed to Mr. Everett Smith, from Dheadora D. Bella, Imus, Cavite, P.I. and on the front it is signed – With Love, Doriny. On the right is signed – Adorable ___ Med, Paulit & Lila. (Should any descendents recognize these photos, please give me more information on who they were. Thank you)

Women of Cavite

Women of Cavite

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Yank magazine, bartender from Brooklyn, New York

Yank magazine, bartender from Brooklyn, New York

Below, General Pierson (right) examines the bullet holes in a Japanese glider downed near Manila with Frank Smith (left), the war correspondent from the Chicago Sun Times that traveled with the 11th Airborne.

Japanese glider

Japanese glider

Japanese A6M Zero fighters near Lae, New Guinea 1943

Japanese A6M Zero fighters near Lae, New Guinea 1943

A cartoon from Camp Polk

A cartoon from Camp Polk

1 April 1945, Okinawa

1 April 1945, Okinawa

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Remember to click on any photo you need to see more clearly. I hope you have enjoyed this blog thus far and will continue to view as the 11th Airborne Division moves on to Okinawa.
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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on March 16, 2013, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 39 Comments.

  1. I was reading older posts and just came upon the image of the Luzon Memorial. I will have to get out the few pictures I have of my father but I’m pretty sure I have him standing in front of this memorial after it was completed. He was back there in the mid to late ’70’s for a reunion with his unit. Amazing job you have done for our hero’s. Hat’s off to you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I just found your site, by searching your father’s work in the P. I.s. For my family, I am trying to write about my great uncle’s (S. Davis Winship) life and internment in Manila. He was one of the 2100+ internees rescued 23 Feb. 1945 from Los Banos. Your dad jumped that day with the j112 airborne under Lt. Ringler. It was a fantastically successful military operation behind enemy lines. Do you have access to photos taken that day? I wish so much to find one with my uncle showing in it. He claimed to ride out on the last Amtrac. Your dad, along with Ringler, Santos, and others also were on it. Is there any chance that anyone might be able to help me in this search? I am perfectly willing to cover fees. David H. Record

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    • I have to admit David that I was tearing up as I read your comment. I’m afraid the photos I posted on line were not mine, but I will check into my books and resources to search for the close-up pictures of the am-traks – I know there are some. That was one day my father was not all that willing to talk about despite the success of the operation. Please keep in touch, I would be thrilled to hear about your great uncle life. Perhaps the 11th Airborne Association would be of assistance, but make sure to inquire as to whether the archives have his records.

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  3. enjoy your posts – keep ’em coming – i may write something eventually on my old 11th AB buddy Bill

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  4. Thank you Sir for visiting my blog and God has blessed you with the work you are doing.

    Keep it up!

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  5. Great blog, its just sad that we seem to have lost the pride we once had. Here in Canada in government offices we are not allowed to say Bless you when someone sneezes, it might offend?????What a world??

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  6. A great blog and wonderful photos, thanks for visiting my blog too.

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  7. Thanks for visiting my site. 🙂

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  8. I’m working backwards and catching up on my blog reading 🙂

    Obviously, I am very interested in this post. That spooky shot at the top just raised the hairs on my body. Strange but don’t want to go there…it’s a cemetery after all. I would like to try to find it at present-day Nasugbu, even if only by satellite imaging…

    The war cemetery…I was actually planning a trip to the Libingan ng Mga Bayani (Grave of Heroes, not sure if it’s the same as the one up there) this week or next, to visit the marker for my grand-uncle. We’ll be celebrating Araw ng Kagitingan in honor of the fallen who gave their lives for freedom on April 9. I wanted to do the trip as part of our social studies/history/character lesson for my kids. If I get to find my uncle’s marker and get some shots, and if you’re interested, I’ll send one to you 🙂

    The family pictures, echoing Mustang Koji, yes, those women are from affluent or at least very comfortable families. I remember seeing the one and only photo of my granduncle (alive) with women in similar attire and my grandma/grandaunts also in similar attire. I’m not affluent by the way, but my father’s clan was. If you’re searching for these ladies, it’s better to go by their names. You already have the one of Ms Bella. If she was from an affluent family then that surname would still be found among her descendants in Imus, Cavite. Or they might be in Subic/Zambales also, as many families from Cavite moved to Subic when the US Subic Naval Base and Ship Repair Facility was built and part of the naval base somewhere in Cavite was moved to Subic. I can’t remember the exact story now…The other photo with the missing surname might be harder to trace.

    Is that Luzon memorial the one in Lingayen Gulf where McArthur landed? I’ve never been there, it’s a 7 to 8 hour road trip which we hope to do someday as a family. The Manila memorial looks familiar but it’s so sad I can’t remember it anymore. I’ve heard of stories from older folks who survived the war, not many want to share about that time.

    I’ll be back to read some more. Good post this one.

    Warmly,
    Mary

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  9. Amazing photographs. I’m delighted you shared them with us and they each ‘speak’ volumes. The cemetery reminds me of something that was an unknown to me until I saw an investigative journalism piece by Dan Rather this past year. The numerous US cemeteries of WWII Veterans beautifully maintained and the US doesn’t pay a dime. Yet, the 10+ years we lived in Europe, no one mentioned the cemeteries to us and we traveled broadly.

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  10. Hi~

    Thanks for visiting and liking my blog. I’m just getting to check out the very interesting photos and written pieces on yours. As a former Marine, I’ve been fascinated by WWII and Vietnam since I was a child.

    Jenny

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  11. Hey thanks for the visit and like on my blog, you have a great blog here.

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  12. Thank you for posting these family treasures. As you know, there was a bowling alley on the Yokohama Naval Base named after Nasugbu…and your blogs have reported on the related battle. But as the young soldiers’ remains turn to dust beneath those crosses, let us all pay tribute for eternity.

    The photos of the lovely lady and her family – if taken soon after battle or war’s end – may be more solvable than normal. If the town in which they lived was like Tokyo, only the well-to-do would have beautiful clothing. Perhaps it wasn’t Manila proper as it was nearly destroyed but still, they appear affluent.

    And the cartoon at the end… It sure brings home some of the “things” that may have been going through these young boys’ hearts and mind at that time. The Garand held above the water was especially poignant as one of the fear paratroopers had was drowning. The US chute release was a deathtrap (couldn’t get out quickly enough underwater) while the Brits had a much superior release mechanism.

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    • Thank you for a wonderful comment and information. Although they were the enemy at the time, your heart has to go out to the young Japanese paratroopers. Their quick release chutes were defective and often let the boys loose hundreds of feet off the ground – might as well be a streamer. It would be great if I could locate the woman from Imus, maybe someone will recognize the photo.

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  13. The memorial to the innocent victims of war is very poignant.

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    • Back in WWII, civilians acted as soldiers, they deserve a memorial. Nowadays, even if a civilian acts as a soldier, the public expects our soldiers to sit back and say – Oh that’s a civilian, I can’t shoot him. (Maybe that’s why WWII was the last war we won – nowadays we just pour money and our son’s lives into war and don’t win a thing.)

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  14. Great to see the pictures. Some interesting memorials.

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  15. I always enjoy the pictures. . . thanks!

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  16. Great pics, thanks for including them.

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  17. Pierre Lagacé

    About Luzon cemetery picture…
    It could be just a spot after processing the negative.

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  18. Pierre Lagacé

    As always… Most interesting.
    Love the family pictures… you know how crazy I am about family pictures.
    Have you ever tried looking for these people?

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    • Yes, I have, but back when I wasn’t quite certain how to go about it. I included the Manila library in my search, but never heard back from anyone. Do you have any ideas?

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